Archive | Gartner

[GUEST POST] The Final Countdown… or how to survive attending MWC 2013

Susannah Archibald / IIAR

It’s that time of year again. When all thoughts turn to the biggest global mobile technology and applications showcase in the world, Barcelona’s Mobile World Congress (MWC). Held each year by the GSMA, the show unveils some key yearly indicators that any attending exhibitor, press member, or aspiring Steve Jobs-acolyte should know about mobile.

According to a recent IIAR webcast I listened into with industry analysts Keith Humphreys of euroLAN and Catherine Haslam of Ovum, as well as members of the IIAR membership committee, estimates say that you’ll be one of nearly 1,500 exhibitors, and more than 67,000 attending members of the public. And if MWC 2012 estimates from the GSMA hold up this year, there could be many more who are interested in demonstrating or learning about your mobile wares.

How can you possibly hope to get maximum value out of Analysts who are attending MWC 2013? Continue Reading →

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IIAR London Forum on 7th March 2013 in London

The next IIAR London Forum will be held on March 7th at 1600 GMT in London (near Victoria)!

For this event we have two great topics on the agenda:

  1. Best Practice session on ‘Sponsoring and Exhibiting at Analyst Events’. Which events and sponsorship types work, what are some of the best practices to get the best value from your investment and which specific analyst events work (and which don’t). Led by a panel of expert AR professionals including Caroline Dennington (Symantec) and Julian Dobbins (Micro Focus).
  2. Analyst Roundtable on ‘Hot Buttons for Financial Services’. Where will the analysts be focusing their research in this sector in 2013 and how can you best position your company’s products and services as a result. Confirmed for this panel are Peter Redshaw (Gartner), Daniel Mayo (Ovum), Catherine Stagg-Macey (Celent), Alex Kwiatkowski (IDC Financial Insights) and Ralph Silva (SRN, HfS and often times the BBC) with Sally Yates (Metia) as chair.

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IIAR Christmas Networking Event concluded successfully!

Analysts and IIAR members alike had a lot of fun at this year’s Christmas party in London on 6th December 2012. More than 60 people came along.  With over 30 analysts attending from companies including Gartner, Forrester, IDC, Ovum, Frost & SullivanInforma, Celent,  CCS Insight, Creative Intellect Consulting, AMI PartnersEuroLAN ResearchFreeform DynamicsPAC UKPlum ConsultingRedMonkVerdantixAnalysys MasonBloor Research, it sure was a great opportunity for IIAR members (including people from MicrosoftAccentureBearingPoint, CSC, TCSSymantecAtosDeloitteDassault SystemesTietoAvaya) to network with their target analysts as well as peers. A big thanks to all those who were able to make it, we sure had a great time! Continue Reading →

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IIAR AR Cafe – Gartner Symposium, Barcelona on 7 November

On Wednesday 7th November, 3:30pm CET, IIAR member Ludovic Leforestier (AR Director at Bearing Point, @bearingpointar, LinkedIn) will be hosting an IIAR AR Cafe.

This will be an informal get-together to discuss AR-related matters and network with peers. It will no doubt be a welcome break in-between the ever hectic schedule of Symposium. It is also a chance to find out more about the IIAR in terms of what membership offers and events being planned or are currently slated in the diary.

If you would like to attend please email me to receive confirmation and contact details.

This event is free to attend and will be at the Hotel Silken Diagonal Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

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IIAR AR US Cafe – Gartner Symposium, Orlando on 21 Oct

On Sunday 21st October at 6:30pm ET, Stephen England – IIAR Board member and Director, KCG – will be hosting a reception event for IIAR members and prospects at Gartner Symposium, Orlando USA. This is a great chance to hear more about the IIAR and to compare notes ahead of the busy Symposium timetable.

The event will be held at the Dolphin Hotel, Fountain Bar and is free to attend.

Please email me to register your interest and receive contact details.

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Gartner completes acquisition of IDEAS International

By Dave Noble, IIAR board member & APJ chapter lead

Gartner has completed the acquisition of Australian competitive analysis firm, IDEAS International, and integrated the research team into the Gartner for Technical Professionals business (formerly Burton Group).

Gartner made a takeover offer for IDEAS in April this year (see Gartner gets the IDEAS from Forrester), with completion of the deal taking place in July. The deal was valued at about A20 million, and was strongly supported by the major shareholders who included company founder, John Tulloch; CEO Steven Bowhill; and board members, including former CEO, Ian Birks.

Established in 1986, IDEAS expanded into the UK and the US, increasing its presence with the acquisition of DH Brown in 2004. Primarily focused on providing comparative performance data to server and storage vendors, it broadened its focus to include end-users in more recent years, offering tools for server consolidation, data centre analysis, and server and storage comparison. Continue Reading →

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IIAR Discussion Group: Running Great Analyst Events on 16 August, 4pm BST / 11am ET

If you’re in the thick of preparations for an upcoming analyst event, or thinking of holding an event next year, this discussion is for you!

We have an extremely distinguished line-up of four great panellists for our next panel discussion on Thursday 16th August, 4-5pm BST / 11-12pm ET / 8-9am PT all about running successful analyst events. Whether you’ve run events in the past or are embarking on one for the first time, this call will be invaluable, discussing top tips from AR pros in the field as well as market leading analysts from Gartner and Forrester. This is a really great opportunity to glean some insights that will make you an AR champion and have your executives raving. Continue Reading →

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[GUEST POST] Big Dogs don’t yap: the secret ingredient for MQ success

Blog courtesy of: Simon Levin (IIAR Board Member)

What is it that makes the difference when it comes to making the step up into the Leaders section of Gartner’s Magic Quadrant? Ever wondered what companies who gain recognition as Leaders have in common? Having seen four of our MQ Tune-Up clients gain Leaders status for the first time last quarter, I thought it might be interesting to go looking for some common themes or attributes.

And as it turned out, the exercise was well worth the effort, because it highlighted one key factor I’d never consciously identified before.

We’re calling it the Big Dog syndrome, and it’s all about looking the part, acting like a Leader right from the start, and, above all, believing that that top right quadrant is your rightful home.

There’s more about this idea on The Skills Connection’s blog but the essence of it is blindingly simple. For a company to be perceived as a Leader, it has to have a leaderly air about it. It has to radiate conviction, as well as competence. It needs to put its case across well, but without the yapping, snapping desperation that marks out those that try too hard. Continue Reading →

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IIAR Gartner exclusive: Your questions answered on great presentations

Ever spent a frustrated hour arguing with an executive on why you shouldn’t have 30 slides for a 30-minute presentation? Or time and again had to insist that a Gartner VP doesn’t need to be told about basic market trends proven with stats from a competing analyst firm?

The IIAR, working with the Gartner AR Community team, has lined up an exclusive one and half hour slot with Gartner to answer your questions about how to deliver great presentations when briefing analysts. This will be an invaluable call to anyone in the AR business and give you real ammunition for insisting your executives spend more time preparing analyst presentations. This is a unique opportunity to glean top tips from some of the biggest names in the business and we hope as many of you as possible will join us.

The event will take place on Thursday 7th June from 3:30-5pm BST / 10:30-12midday EDT. You can either attend in-person at the Gartner offices in Egham or dial in via conference call.

 Host:

Jeff Golterman, GVP Gartner and AR Community Lead (in person – Egham, UK)

Speakers:

Ed Thompson, VP Distinguished Analyst (in-person – Egham, UK)

Bryan Britz, Research Director (conf call – USA)

The IIAR will be holding an informal drinks reception afterwards. This session is for IIAR members only – please email me to take part if you’ve not already done so.

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[Guest Post] Does the consulting approach beat published research?

Simon Levin / Skills Connections (IIAR, 2013)By: Simon Levin, The Skills Connection / IIAR UK Co-Chapter Lead

We saw an interesting blogging spat last week between Stanton Jones of ISG and Lydia Leong at Gartner, with the flames fanned by tweeted comments from Phil Fersht of HfS. The row was centred on some research published recently by Lydia on managed hosting providers, but its ramifications are much wider.

For those who haven’t yet followed the Twitter feeds and blog links, let me try to summarise what’s going on.

Stanton’s charge is that Magic Quadrants serve a purpose by offering insight into vendors and products, but that the high-level nature of the analysis means they are poor primary tools for making choices. He emphasises the lack of nuance possible in a written article, compared with the detailed, customised insight that can be provided via a consulting engagement. And, of course, he is right. Continue Reading →

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The hype cycle of Vendor Briefing Requests

Have you ever submitted a vendor briefing request? For those of you who have, and for those who have yet to experience this joy, here’s a humorous and (perhaps only slightly) exaggerated description of the process and some insights into why AR people always seem to struggle with it.

What’s clear is that analysts and executives alike don’t know or care how complicated the process is and don’t appreciate AR folks sometimes …. especially when it goes wrong. I’m sure we all have stories of briefings going wrong before they have even started – because the dial-ins don’t work, or there’s a troublesome time-zone challenge, or because the IP-based telephone network decides to crash.
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[GUEST POST] An Insider’s Guide to Technology Analysts by Cormac Foster

Thanks a lot to ReadWriteWeb to allow reposting of this excellent entry by By Cormac Foster (LinkedIn, @cormacfoster).

The original post can be found here.

Gartner IDC Forrester logos - IIAR blog post

Gartner. Forrester. IDC. And lots of smaller fish, too. You can’t read a tech-industy news story, attend a conference or listen to a sales pitch without someone quoting an industry analyst. For tech companies, analysts are big news and big business, promising to help with transformation, monetization and a slew of other things ending in “-ation.”

But what do technology industry analysts really do? And how do you find the one that’s right for your company’s needs. Let me try to explain, from the inside. You see, from 1999 through 2001, I was an analyst at Jupiter Research, now part of Forrester Research.

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Gartner gets the IDEAs from Forrester

It seems Gene took Gartner‘s shopping trolley on a jumbo to Oz this week and a page from George‘s book: the research firm just announced it was buying Ideas International [ASX:IDE] was established in 1981 as a consultancy service and since 1986 has provided its special brand of research to IT users and vendors. This acquisition is still subject to regulatory and other approvals.

This move has a strong reminiscence from Forrester’s purchase of Springboard last year (read our post:Forrester joins the feeding frenzy, buys Springboard)

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Has time come for a disruptive analyst firm?

Wine connoisseurs take as much pleasure talking about drink than savouring it…. so let me indulge you into an analogy between research firms and some of my favourites.

As with fine wines and corporate buying trends, so goes analyst firms.  The shift of power from IT to Business signifies a move from Wine to Champagne….

Ray (@rwang0, LinkedIn, blog) writes here about the latest IIAR Forum London and he’s got a few interesting points.

  1. Client base and research approach
    • There’s a wine analogy there: Gartner is like a Bordeaux (predictable blends) and Forrester is more like a Burgundy (more variable but sometimes great).
    • Gartner tends to sell to a mature IT audience, which is where most of the IT budget is. Its research output thus tends to be more conservative, after all most people don’t really want to experiment the at bleeding edge. As a result, it’s unlikely you’ll be surprised by a genial piece of research.
    • Forrester does this as well, but because (or thanks to) its marketing research, also cater for that role and its research style tends to be more adventurous (the Giga legacy probably) even if its coverage quality and quality is less constant.
    • And IDC sells to IT vendors mostly, a little to industry leaders (has to be a Côtes du Rhône, with elements of both depending on the individual analyst for opinion whilst the trackers are more constant –Shiraz is a bit like Marmite, it’s “love it or hate it”).
    • The point there is that your client base is your legacy, and unless you’re Steve Jobs or Henry Ford, most fail to break away from ‘building a faster horse’. In IT research aspects, it translates into “IT must align with business” (yawn). Analysts have been preaching this for the last 15 years, and it seems the issue hasn’t gone away.  Some part of the IT will be run as a utility (a better word than cloud, and in the same bucket than facilities and real estate) whilst the innovative stuff will be done by the business. IT is the business, the rest is a commodity (this doesn’t mean that everyone knows how to provision a commodity efficiently).
    • Another interesting aspect is that because they sell to a mature audience, they will confronted to a bit of an issue when baby-boomers will (finally) retire in the coming 5 years and be replaced by Gen-X and Gen-Y who have no appetite for academic style research. [Note: there’s a discussion here with some fellow IIAR members on whether the Gartner client base is that, er, experienced. What do you think?]
      Indeed Gartner is trying (again) to grow its SMB user base, but unless they radically change the way research is written, they will probably fail again. Constellation has probably a good card to play there by targeting smaller, innovative companies –even though up to 2/3 won’t make it into adult age.
  2. On “design point”, Constellation is pitching itself right in the “future of work” trend.
    • For analysts, time will tell if it’s ensuring, but trying to retain them by force (check this letter from Forrester’s CEO George Colony on non-compete) isn’t going to build a star-stable. Indeed, whilst Gartner seems to be doing a good job at keeping its best analyst, but it’d be curious to see how the average experience of Forrester analysts has evolved over time. There seem to be more researchers who graduated as analysts than analysts who came from a previous career. That in itself isn’t a sole predictor for insight, though it helps, but one would think that there’s a cost aspect (it’s the Forrester vs. the Giga models).
    • For users, I’d venture out to say it’s again like Marmite.  For establish companies, dealing with established brands having real offices offices is probably deemed ‘safer’. For Constellation’s target customers, meeting in a Stabucks probably isn’t a problem. James Governor (@monkchips, blog) seems to have found out that being unconventional actually helps with his specific audience: developpers.
  3. On analyst access
    • In terms of business model, Ray is indeed accessible which is quite refreshing compared to other analysts who for instance reduce briefing slots to 30mn. Whether that can be scaled without administering Modafinil to the rest remains to be seen.
    • For end users, it would be a net-gain if the processes to ensure a constant user experience as Constellation grows in size work effectively.
  4. On research approach
    • Legacy firms underplay the community aspect indeed but let’s not forget that Gartner is quite a large community in itself.
    • From an end-user aspect, one could expect more innovative research.
  5. On sales
    • IMHO it’s where I’ll be watching Constellation as converting from a consulting model to a RAS one isn’t that straightforward. So far they seem to be on the right track though.

Bottom line:

  • Gaining enough scale to gain a sufficient end-user base is challenging for mid-sized firms but Constellation seem to be making all the right noises.
  • Establish firms need to break away from their traditional user base to reinvent themselves before baby-boomers retire.

Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn, @lludovic)

See also Duncan’s post on the IIAR Forum with Constellation:

And Ray Wang’s own post:

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[GUEST POST] Timing is everything

There’s no penalty for jumping the gun

On your marks. Get Set. Go. When the starting gun goes off, there is always going to be a rush of adrenalin, a surge of excitement, and a striving to get up to speed and do your best.

But when the starting gun goes off in relation to a Gartner Magic Quadrant (MQ) assessment of your company, in many ways it is already too late.

Magic Quadrants generally appear once a year. For the companies who are on the receiving end, they can be make or break factors, with a huge influence on business prospects for the year ahead.

For the analysts involved, they are important pieces of work, but they have to be fitted in alongside research reports, client inquiries and meetings, events and presentations, custom engagements, webinars, blogs, and a host of other commitments. Leaving all the rest of an analyst’s annual workload aside, producing a Magic Quadrant means identifying and investigating multiple companies that will appear in the final diagram. On top of this, the analyst has to give due consideration to all the peripheral candidates that need to be evaluated before decisions can be taken about whether or not they should be included.

The wonder is not that so many MQ assessments leave so many vendors feeling disappointed, but that so many MQs win general acceptance as being pretty fair, diligent, and useful assessments of the state of play in particular markets.

To read the full article click here.

Extract courtesy of Simon Levin, MD (Europe) – The Skills Connection

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Gartner publishes MQ FAQ

The Gartner Ombudswoman has just blogged >link< about a new frequently asked questions document on the Gartner Magic Quadrant. Overall it’s really useful and contains many points that AR pros should know.

For instance, did you know the analysts had to raise a business case for every new MQ? This is meant to limit their numbers (there’s been in the past some MQ’s ranking very few vendors for instance) and ensure consistency, but as a potentially it can contribute curb the number of local magic quadrant (i.e. EMEA MQ’s for instance) -so watch this space.

I’ve also added a comment on Marketscopes, what do you think?

Other posts on the subject:

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What’s going on next week at Gartner Symposium?

After over 12 years in Cannes, the Gartner Symposium is moving to Barcelona. The events team told me that they were going to move it in 2012 anyway, but had to do it one year earlier because of the G20 (you know, that meeting that’s turned into a Greek tragedy). Anyhow, is there anyone here who remembers when it all started? I’ve been to about 12 and lost the count…

Here is a summary of activities for AR pros in general.

Monday 7th November 2011

  • 0930-1030 – Barcelona “Optimizing Relationships With Analyst Firms” Tutorial
    Timor Meeting Room, Hilton Diagonal Mar Hotel This is a seminar organized by Gartner, see below for the description.

Tuesday 8th November 2011

  • 1530-1830 – Barcelona AR Forum and Cocktail Reception
    Ballroom C, Hilton Diagonal Mar Hotel
    Gene Hall, Peter Sondergaard, Jeff Golterman will as usual present a business and research update. Caroline Dennington (@CIARgirl) from Symantec and myself will be on a panel. Do sent any questions you’d like to be asked to Gartner my way (DM @iiar or email lleforestier a.t analstrelationsdotorg)
  • 2030- IIAR Café
    This is the usual social for IIAR Members, the details are on Huddle. Except since many need their beauty sleep, we’re doing dinner rather than breakfast. Continue Reading →
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And the IIAR Analyst of the Year 2011 is…

For the fourth year running, AR professionals have been polled to select the analyst and firms they consider the best best for thought leadership, ease to do business with, influence and value for money.

The IIAR is delighted to announce that this year’s IIAR Analyst of the Year 2011 goes to…

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Analyst firms: rock star bands or record label dinosaurs?

A recent contract renewal conversation with an IT analyst firm rep got me wondering how record companies ended up suing their best adopters and whether the end is nigh for them. Both music and research live on IP, and there are many similarities, though we’ll only explore the consumption and value aspects in this post.

Many have a better informed opinion than myself on the music industry but I tend to agree with Jon: there’s been a lack of innovation. The CD was a more practical format but quality wasn’t one hundred times better. I have yet to be immersed in a true quadriphonic experience, and so on. Sure thing, the mp3 format is much more practical but it would be far fetched to claim to say that the industry embraced it willingly. Actually, I would go as far as to say iTunes is Steve Job’s best ‘invention’, that was to get record labels to licence their music on it. In addition to the lack of technical innovation, there isn’t a great deal clarity in the offerings. Good new sounds maybe surfacing all the time however most are ephemeral. I can’t think of many that indeed built a following matching that of the 60ies  and 70ies (and even 80ies) household names. That last point is important, as building up a loyal consumer base is much more profitable than rotating new products. Continue Reading →

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