Author Archive | Ludovic Leforestier

Scheduling made easy?

tetris-blocks[1]Thanks to James, I’ve just discovered Tungle.me, a service to publish your availability.

Scheduling is one of the most time consuming (and least rewarding) tasks AR Managers have to perform in their duty, think of trying to play a 4D Tetris game or being a dating agency for high-speed particules in in LHC. Simply put, executives and IT analysts have a better chance to meet in an airport lounge than in a briefing I’ll arrange.

If all the analysts were on tungle.me, it would be easier to schedule calls as I could triangulate this with my execs calendars.

I hope IDC, Forrester or Gartner will adopt this.

For in person meetings, there are two other web 2.0 tools called dopplr and tripit, which allow you to share where you’ll be with a a selected group of people. Quite practical to see when analysts are attending conferences.

This aspect of declarative authorisation is important for privacy (and safety/security reasons), tungle.me should add this. You can of course mash those ones up with your LinkedIn profile and voila!

If only things were that simple 🙂 But I’m an optimist!

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Around Stephen Roberts from Kable in 10 questions

Today it is my pleasure to introduce Stephen Roberts from Kable, a specialist IT analysis firm covering public sector in the UK for his own interview in our IIAR Around in 10 questions. Actually, it’s 12 this Friday as Stephen took the joker questions as well. So read on, and don’t forget to book really early to get a table a this favourite restaurant!

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[JOB OPENING] SENIOR PR/MARKETING MANAGER, UKBROADBAND LTD

2) THE ROLE

GENERAL

The Senior PR/Marketing Manager will be a technosavvy evangelist who drives the company’s service vision and ensures that the messages to the marketplace and press are compelling and consistent. They will be a key member of inter-disciplinary leadership teams to develop strategic, succinct and effective service and marketing initiatives. This is a classic marketing management role in a small high growth technology firm. Responsibilities include marketing communications, public relations, external/industry communications, product marketing, competitive analysis, tactical marketing programmes, events, lead generation and market research.

REPORTS TO: Director of Sales & Marketing

LOCATION: UK

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[JOB OPENING] EMEA PR and AR Manager – NetApp

Job posted on netapp.com: Netapp: PR and AR Manager – EMEA

Job Summary Job Summary:
The AR/PR manager is a key function under Corporate Marketing and the role will ensure that processes and initiatives from Corporate are understood, adopted and tracked across EMEA with the field marketing teams. The role will work closely with country and GEO teams to determine the field needs and work with Corporate Marketing to deliver upon those needs.
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Should the analysts be blogging?

Phil Fersht (ex. AMR) started an interesting conversation on his Outsourcing Blog: Horses for Sources with a post titled  The great analyst firewall: will banning analysts from blogging damage the traditional research business, or help create an entirely new one?

I really like those quotes in particular, the first one depicts the onset of the analyst scene in the noughties (IMHO Phil, it happened a bit before though):The Skills of Star Performers Aren’t Portable

The “rock star” analyst had arrived. People paid good money to spend time with these people, to hear their views, use them as a sounding-board, or just to be associated with them. And their growing corporate stables certainly didn’t refuse the increasing moneys that came rolling in off the back of their growing relationships and influence. The rock stars created buzz and drove the industry, challenging both vendors and customers to innovate and transform business models.

However, like anything else, corporates like to monetize their brands to the max, scale their businesses and drive down their costs. It’s business economics one-on-one, and the big analyst firms are no different.

And its consequence:

We want Bill, not Ben

Having their clients say “I want Bill, not Ben” was (and still is) infuriating to the analyst firms. They want their clients to pay the same for the 28-year old fresh from her MBA, than they did for the rock stars of yesteryear. And they’re currently succeeding, as there aren’t too many alternatives right now.

Now, as a self-confessed “ex-Rockstar” puts it, it doesn’t go without implications for the business model, and maybe this is why Forrester, but also Gartner restricts analysts to blogging on their coverage areas to their corporate site, while Ovum doesn’t even feature their analyst bios on their extranets:

A (now departed for vendor land) fellow ex-analyst at IDC used to say that most of the firms could never figure out how to deal with an analyst transitioning from labor to talent since you pay each of those people in very different ways. Talent drives revenues, but paying people as talent is bad for profit plans.

To me this is quite obvious: the result of analysts work (read when paid by their employers) is intellectual property. And since that IP is not only created during business hours (whatever that means nowadays), it rightly belong to the analyst firms -just like inventions and patents they might come up with. This is purely hypothetical because never has one ever heard of a patent filed by an IT analyst. (DISCLAIMER: yes, provocative statement, but who knows we might learn something cool from the comments of this posts?)

So, just get over it, who gives a damn anyway? BTW, check Josh’s comment in the thread and you’ll see the Forrester blogs debate has no raison d’être. Merv also blogger here about the different policies here, good wrap up with lots of quotes.

More intriguing are firms without a presence at all in the online conversation -I’d say they’re missing out, both on branding, influence, research validation, etc… There’s little evidence to back this up (cf. Gerry‘s comment).

So, where does it lead us? One sub-header gives up a clue to the real issue, and that’s way beyond blogging:

Aren’t analysts supposed to create buzz?

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Gartner is growing, its end-user influence as well

Interesting comment from Carter in his post about Gartner’s earnings Gartner Q4 and full year 2009 earnings – implications for analyst relations and research clients » SageCircle Blog:

AR teams should use Gartner’s growth in enterprise clients as an education tool with stakeholders and executive sponsors. Rather than experiencing shrinking influence in this recession, Gartner has increased its influence because of the business value it offers to enterprise clients and its ability to leverage the largest sales force in the analyst industry.

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[JOB POSTING] Industry Analyst Relations Manager, £50-65k base + bens London or Hampshire

Connections - Recruiting Success!
Industry Analyst Relations Manager, £50-65k base + bens London or Hampshire

Do you drive market trends? Can you utilise Research & Industry data firms to segment business opportunities? Using your pro-active, creative, entrepreneurial spirit you will be developing compelling customised marketing plans to increase our International footprint. We are a recognised Software brand name, Microsoft & Cisco partner experiencing rapid growth.

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Around Allan Behrens in 10 questions

Allan Behrens, TaxalToday, from postcardesque Peaks District, comes the interview from Allan Behrens, ex. Cambashi and now having started his own company called Taxal (blog, twitter). I bet you’ll never figure out where the name comes from but no, he doesn’t advises bankers and MP’s on avoiding the taxman.

1. What are your coverage areas?
We’re focused on the use and enablement of IT in industry and helping IT providers make it a reality. Our focus is on technologies, a sub-set of key business sectors, sales channels, business development and management and execution consulting

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
Many competent people, some with too little motivation to listen! With the recent spate of acquisitions it appears that the industry is moving closer to a two tiered environment – the very large and very small.

3. What’s your typical day like?
Emails, calls, research, publishing, projects and visits, often interspersed with operational issues and demands for attention from my better half.

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
Not one regarding actual analysis per se. The most memorable nightmare I had on an analyst visit was when I missed a return flight from Dublin to Manchester; in this case an absolutely critical one scheduled to have me home in time to catch a holiday connection with my long-suffering wife. IBM’s AR team were stars in sorting out the chaos – wife was delighted (nay relieved)! Whew.

5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
Our revenues are principally vendor led with significant end-user touch and elements coming from governmental and investor communities. We publish insight and non-confidential research in the press and on our web site.

6. What is your research methodology?
This really depends on the project We are purely project led at this time. We tailor our methods and resource utilisation based on what’s needed to deliver the optimum output.

7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
Making sure the analysts actually get the collaterals they’re promised after an event – drives me nuts and costs time. Also being responsive is good practice……

8. What are your offerings and key deliverables?
Predominantly presentations, workshops, reports and publications

9. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
Hmm tricky. Best food by far is my local pub but I wouldn’t want to name it in case it gets inundated and prices go up! Not too much of an issue as it’s in the Cheshire countryside and far from the madding crowd – friends can always contact me directly for the name.

10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
Next six month, continuing to grow the business (from a standing start late last year) and exceeding my customers expectations! Corny but true. Next 30 minutes, heads down to meet my deadlines (see second response of the first part of this question).

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JOB OPENING European PR & Analyst Relations Manager

This is a fantastic opportunity for a confident, motivated and enthusiastic team player with strong verbal and written communications skills.

Candidates should have a passion for technology and a passion for marketing and brand; delivering results, and conquering big challenges. The ability to think creatively and strategically with the ability to thrive in a dynamic environment is a must.

In this role, you will identify and engage directly with industry analysts and other specialists to educate and influence them, as well as to shape messaging for current products and the value proposition of the next generation of products and services.

In addition you will manage on a day to day basis the European PR agency to ensure that each region benefits from the corporate brand messaging as well as from local PR opportunities appropriate to each region. To be successful, you will have extensive knowledge of analyst & PR disciplines and processes and experience working with all levels of executives, customers and analysts. You will have significant experience in analyst relations, PR, or Brand in an IT environment with a successful track record. Strong technical knowledge and/or background in a technology environment is important as is experience of working in a pan-European role. Languages are essential and ideally you will speak a combination of Spanish, French, and English.

Please send your details to resourcing@reesmarx.com

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[GUEST POST] Vendors: suggestions to maximize briefing value, by Carol Rozwell / Gartner

Carol Rozwell from Gartner (blog, @CRozwell, bio) kindly allowed us to reproduce here her post on Vendors: suggestions to maximize briefing value. It neatly complement her peer Linda Rowan from IDC’s Briefing tips and best practices.

 

Last week, I was treated to a number of interesting vendor briefings, the most engaging of which was conducted in Second Life. But despite having the opportunity to view some innovative product offerings, I also had to contend with some frustrating vendor practices. In the spirit of helping vendors maximize the short time they have for a briefing with an analyst, I offer my list of five worst practices I wish vendors would curtail:
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Around Claus Egge in 10 questions

Today I have the privilege to introduce Claus Egge whom I’ve known for quite some time now as he was the lead storage analyst in EMEA for IDC. They’ve let some talents go recently and he’s now working as an independent analyst: check his site here.

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    Storage, content, hardware, software, cloud, backup, protection, DR, BC. The industry has been to make these disciplines as invisible as possible. IT professionals want to take all this for granted, but with an increased focus on how to make use of the information. It is not so much that there is an awful lot of information, it is about finding out the way to deliver the information and add value. There is plenty of scope to help customers and industry being successful.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    Insight: there is more free information available, so it presents a dilemma: it actually makes it harder to search and digest for industry and customers. But good intelligence is always worth having. Spotting customer behaviour before it changes is cool. Opinion: quantity does not equal quality. Marketing support: The industry needs to be smarter about it’s spending as it attempts to grab the attention of customers and prospects.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    Depends: meeting contacts is different from managing data models, so every task has got its place. It is about discipline, looking after customers of course, but also freeing up time to experiment with ideas.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    The best relationships are based on mutual respect and understanding each other’s goals and reality. So back to the question about things to avoid: pretending solutions are already perfect, pretending customers are blissfully happy, pretending competition is beneath contempt. Lots of time has been wasted that way. The best repeatable encounters are the ones you always look forward to and all parties get value from them.
  5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model? (where are your revenues coming from, mix between users and vendors?)
    Currently enjoying the freedom of running my own business. Mostly vendor business but exploring IT professionals too.
  6. What is your research methodology, in 255 characters or less?  (primary research, F2F or phone, secondary only, etc…)
    Finding the information a customer is looking for in order to help make smarter decisions.
  7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
    Good AR practice balances the need to get in touch and the flow of information by importance. Once events are planned the good ones are a mixture of plenaries about new strategy, one-on-ones with the right execs and not least a chance to socialise. Some companies consistently put on solid gatherings and everybody benefits. Others dither and change their approach frequently. It is not so much that the paranoid may survive as much as not letting paranoia rule.
  8. What are your offerings and key deliverables?
    Varied: from strategic advice over bespoke data cuts, customer surveys, white papers, speaking at events and workshops.
  9. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I’ll volunteer a pub in West London. Great choice of beers as you would expect from me, but also a good restaurant. Its name is The White Horse, it is on Parson’s Green in SW6. Worth travelling across London for and also worth finding if you live abroad on a trip to London.
  10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    My challenge is clearly increasing my business. But also about articulating successfully how industry and customers need to work smarter and better together. I am still excited that there are a lot great solutions available to IT customers; let us help more customers exploiting them.
  11. Is there another analyst (a peer in your firm or with another firm) whose work  you rate highly?
    I would like to make a plug for Martin Hingley at ITCandor. Great insight, great integrity and his energy is a source of inspiration. We worked together for many years
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What are the right staffing levels for AR?

There’s been an interesting conversation recently on one of the LinkedIn groups I belong to, and as the participants kindly gave me their permission to do so I thought I’d post it here for everyone’s benefit.

Gregg LampfIt started with a question from Gregg Lampf (AR + Marketing Director at SafeNet):

Are there any rules of thumb or recommended staffing levels for dedicated AR people in companies?

Marc Duke (independent, blog)  answered “1 in EMEA but it depends on size/scope or role and or if it involves mkt intelligence“.

Robert Eastman, MBA, CIARP Robert Eastman chipped in:

One of the better resources that I have seen on this is the book by William Hopkins (of the Knowledge Capital Group), Influencing the Influencers. You should really read this book to get the full color and context of their model. In short, however, the rule of thumb that this book proposes is one AR person for every 2-3 major business initiatives. It would not surprise me if the Institute of Industry Analyst Relations, Sagecircle, Lighthouse Analyst Relations also had some advice or insight here. I would enjoy hearing what you find out. Could you share?

Efrem MallachAR guru Efrem Mallach added some good insight:

Firms tend to get a full-time AR professional when they reach annual revenue of about US$100 million. This is an average. Individual situations vary widely on both sides of this figure depending on the specific company situation. From there up the number grows, again very approximately, as the square root of revenue. A company would have about two FT people in AR at an annual revenue of $400 million or thereabouts, three at $1 billion and so on. This is a straight line on a semi-log graph.
These figures come from looking at a lot of companies in many areas of high-tech, plotting the two figures (annual revenue and analyst relations FT equivalent headcount) on a graph, and fitting a curve to where they cluster. T
hese are broad averages. You have to look at the breadth of a firm’s product line, how it breaks down vis-à-vis typical analyst practices, its geographic scope, who it sells to, its typical price points (they affect how much analysts influence its sales), etc., etc…, to come up with an appropriate number for a given firm. There is usually good business justification for spending more on AR than most firms do.

Ludovic Leforestier I agreed with Efrem:

It’s a decreasing curve that tends to flatten out at 1/$b revenue.
This said, the product mix is important: you need more AR managers for companies having a diverse s/w portfolio with a wide footprint, less for h/w typically.

So the best way to go is actually starting from the goals and the audience:

  • if the goal is to support sales directly, then 1 AR manager cannot follow more than 15 Tier I analysts (and that’s a big task).
  • if the job is more marketing oriented (producing white papers, doing more 1:many events) then this ratio can increase.

Tim O'SullivanTim O’Sullivan (EMEA AR for Deloitte) added:

I agree with Robert – all depends on what is important to the company. I would be loathe to make a recommendation based on revenue in anything except an affordability discussion (can we afford 1 more AR). The thing with revenue if you hire a new AR pro (even if you are a $1BN Revenue company) and they close 10 analyst related deals in a year worth $50M then you can afford it. Ludovic is correct about the product mix but services appears missing from the list – a diverse services based organisation would need a substantial team imo. Map the AR team objectives back to the strategic goals of the company – that shoudl give you a fair idea of what is important and allow you to structure a set of programs to support the corporate goals. Once you have these programs (either topic, geographic or some other structure) then you will have a fair idea through an AR Audit how many analysts you have to cater for and what your tactics are and therefore what the team size should be. Given the imoportance of AR and the different approaches in different companies I would be careful following rules of thumb and reccommend due dilignece and planning as the most prudent way to proceed.

Bob SakakeenyBob Sakakeeny (product manager at CA) gave another point of view:

If the average analyst impacts $2.3 million in revenue per year, with customer facing analysts more and vendor facing analysts less, then analyst relations’ staffing decisions can be disconnected from the company’s current revenues. An opportunity cost analysis helps management understand what they miss out on by not staffing AR rather than trying to figure out how to afford AR. Although AR has a statistically greater influence on customer decision making than PR does, companies still pour money into PR visability rather than AR effectiveness.

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Register for the Gartner Analyst Relations Webinar on January 7th

Gartner will be hosting their quarterly AR call on the 7/1. They usually make a good update –this time it will be focussed on AMR –a good time to get answers to all the questions asked on the blogs recently: on the IIAR blog (you read it there first!), but also on Analyst Insight, Analyst Equity, Sage Circle, Technobabble, Spend Matters, ARcade, Supply Chain Matters, ITasITis, MGI Research.

In passing, on the “why” question, someone told me it might well be to send a signal to investor that Gartner was doing “something” –a quite interesting theory and I would say probably the smartest reason I’ve heard so far.

Anyway, here are the call details –courtesy of Gartner.

Gartner Quarterly Analyst Relations Webinar
Dear Colleague:

As promised during our December 3 webinar about the Gartner announcement of its acquisition of AMR Research, Inc., we are planning an update for the AR Community on the Gartner and AMR integration.

We’ll be holding a special webinar on Thursday, January 7, 2010, for the Gartner AR Community where we will update you on our overall perspectives and begin to discuss key integration details. We’ve invited back both Michael Yoo, senior vice president, Gartner High-Tech & Telecom Programs, and Peter Sondergaard, senior vice president, Gartner Research, to share their perspectives on progress to date on both the Gartner and AMR Research team and the Gartner and AMR High-Tech & Telecom offerings integration.

Michael and Peter also look forward to fielding your questions on the integration. We encourage you to send them in advance to arcommunity a t gartner d o t com and we’ll add them to the webinar discussion points.

We hope you will join us!

Thursday, January 7, 2010
REGISTER HERE
7:30 a.m. San Francisco
10:30 a.m. New York
15.30 London
16.30 Paris, Berlin, Frankfurt

Please note: A replay of the webinar will be available on the Gartner AR Community page on gartner.com within 72 hours.

Sincerely,

Jeff Golterman
Group Vice President
Gartner High-Tech & Telecom Programs
AR Community Lead.

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[GUEST POST] Briefing tips and best practices from Lisa Rowan / IDC

Analyst PhotoOur guest post today is from Lisa Rowan (@lisarowan), IDC’s Program Director for HR, Learning and Talent Strategies.  Read on for Lisa’s tips for briefing analysts from the analyst perspective.

There are excellent resources available to assist the AR profession including IIAR but on this side of the briefing table, it seems like that advice is not universally followed. As analysts we get a steady stream of requests for our time and often for a first introduction. I’d say that for the most part this goes well but there are some tips I thought might be worth underscoring to make the briefings effective for you and the analyst. For a lot of you, these might seem obvious but trust me that I wouldn’t write these tips if there weren’t situations where these things occur.
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WORLD EXCLUSIVE: Gideon Gartner on the IIAR Blog!

Ovum Fireside Chat with Gideon Gartner, Jonathan Yarmis and David RossiterWell, almost…. Ovum kindly gave us an exclusive for the video below.

Following Datamonitor’s re-launch of their consolidated IT research brands under the Ovum name, they have held two back to back events in London and New York: Collaborative Intelligence launch event.

The London event featured “the Patriarch” Gideon Gartner (the founder of Gartner and Giga), superstar Jonathan Yarmis (LinkedIn, ex. AMR and now with Ovum, @jyarmis) and IIAR co-founder and AR extraordinaire David Rossiter (blog, @davidrossiter, LinkedIn, firm).  The New Amsterdam event was with Carter Lusher instead of David.

The “fireside chat” is on the IT analyst business, its beginnings and weaknesses in the original model bringing technology and business together over the course of the last 20 years. It contains quite a few really good thoughts provoking issues, including:

  • What’s the future of IT analyst firms?
  • Is the average age and experience of analysts decreasing?
  • Should IT analysts be paid like financial analysts, on results?
  • What should be the alternatives to Gartner?

Here are some links to the other videos:

And finally, do check Ovum’s landing page on AMR: Does the Gartnerization of AMR raise concerns about the future quality of their research?

Other posts on the Gartner Magic Quadrant

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IIAR Christmas Café on Dec 3rd, 6pm onwards

So far the IIAR has had a great response from members, non-members and analysts who plan on attending the its IIAR Christmas Café tomorrow evening. The event is being held at a pub across near Farringdon tube stationin London.

If you haven’t RSVP’d to get the address to to attend please email edgyurko at gmail d o t com or DM @iiar.

With the Gartner’s Quarterly AR call, theSage Circle and InformationSpan+LighouseAR and the calls also taking place tomorrow, we’re expecting some great discussion.

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While Gartner goes after AMR, Forrester goes after…

Strategic Oxygen: Breathing New Life Into Your BusinessStrategic Oxygen!

While Gartner (NYSE:IT)  decided to buy out AMR and fill a coverage gap in SCM, with hindsight a strategy hinted in Cannes (well maybe?). The Gartner-AMR deal certainly has caused a bit of a stir, with over 6000 hits in the blogosphere! While I’m on that news item, I must add thatGartner will hosting tomorrow a special AR Webinar on AMR Research acquisition and that in addition of the blogs I list below (read those first: Carter’s, Bob’s and Tony’s entries before) there was a very relevant comment thread started by Merv Adrian and answered by Kate on inquiries.

Most of the respondents of our poll cited Forrester as the best “Second opinion” following this acquisition, so it’s interesting to note that while Gartner kept on its strategy to leverage its research through a deep sales coverage by investing in a key coverage area, Forrester on the other hand decided to expand its role-based research capabilities with capabilities to help IT vendors marketing more efficiently their products via buyers research, analytics, media planning, etc…

Impact for AR:

  • While Forrester do have credibility and interesting offerings for marketing professionals and other roles, their product and especially industry coverage remains inconsistent.
  • In particular, there have been some questions about replacing the recently departed (not litterally thank god) high-profile analysts such as  Ray Wang (blog, Twitter) and Jeremiah Owyang (blog, Twitter).
  • However, there are some signs that Forrester analysts may have more flexibility to resume limited coverage of industries.
  • AR professionals need to clearly identify the roles analysts write for before engaging with them, as briefing a Forrester analyst does not necessarily align with their goals if they are coverage and end user impact.

Wrap-up of the posts on the Gartner-AMR deal:

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Gartner buys AMR -what’s the impact for AR Managers and competitors?

AMR Research. Bold Ideas. Compelling Research. Pragmatic Advice.The Twitter underworld is in ebullition this afternoon and the West Coast isn’t yet awake: the consolidation mouvement in the IT Analysis Industrys keeps steamrolling, the latest one to be picked up being AMR Research -by Gartner (NYSE:IT):

@iiar: RT @Gartner_inc: Gartner enters into Agreement to Acquire AMR Research, Inc. http://bit.ly/71BFeq

Nothing on the AMR site yet, just this press release on the Gartner web site, with the following facts:

  • Price: $64m
  • AMR 2009 revenues: $40 million
  • Rationale: it’s complementary  as one would expect -“AMR Research is expected to expand Gartner’s suite of research offerings and also complement its consulting and events businesses.  Moreover, the addition of AMR Research’s experienced sales team should enhance Gartner’s ability to further penetrate the vast market opportunity for syndicated research.  The combination is also expected to drive operational efficiencies and cost savings.”
  • Product fit: “[AMR] is the market leader for research related to supply chain management, which is inextricably linked to IT and has become a central and growing issue for many organizations.  We expect the acquisition to give us immediate presence in this market and the ability to generate substantial synergies by selling AMR Research products to Gartner clients and Gartner products to AMR Research clients.  The addition of AMR Research’s team of approximately 40 research analysts and 45 sales executives should enable us to offer expanded resources to our clients and increase our opportunities for growth.”
  • Financials: the transaction is expected to be dilutive to EPS by -$0.11 to -$0.09 FY10 ; accretive to EPS by $0.01 to $0.04 in FY11.


Impact for AR Managers:

  • Positive: this will broaden the Gartner portfolio and help AMR reaching further geographically and deeper into accounts, leveraging Gartner’s infrastructure and sales
  • Negative: this will reduce negotiation levers for IT vendors as well as competition in Applications Software IT research
  • Collateral impact: a larger Gartner offering may be a threat for Forrester (NASDAQ:FORR), Ovum-Datamonitor and other IT Analysis Firms as well as an opportunity to fulfill the “alternative opinion” and possibly hire seasonned and connected AMR analysts

Tell us what you think!

AR Managers, how do you see this impacting your role?

Gartner competitors, how do you position yourselves on this?

Take our poll:


UPDATES 1/12/09:

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Agenda for today’s IIAR London Forum with Forrester

Here’s the agenda for today’s Forum –action packed as usual… and with the proverbial curry at the end!

Agenda
1500-1530   Social media tutorial
1545-1600   Registration
1600-1605   Introductions and welcome
1605-1620   Report back from Gartner Symposium
1620-1655   Discussion groups:
– AR and social media
– Planning for 2010
– Gaining and maintaining executive support for AR
1655-1715 Discussion groups report back
1715-1730 Break
1730-1830 Guest speaker: Brad Holmes, VP Technology Research at Forrester Research
1830 p.m. Close of meeting and informal dinner

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