Tag Archives | IIAR

[Guest Post] Identifying influencers by apparent importance vs real trust

By Barbara French / Tekrati (LinkedIn, @bfr3nch)

Analyst relations professionals are dealing with more types of analysts and analyst-like influencers every day. How do you know who’s important among these new faces? Some insights from a pharma influencer relations study can give you fresh perspectives on identifying, differentiating and prioritizing your AR targets.

This post is reprinted from my personal blog Sway, where I discuss analyst relations and broad-based influencer relations. You may know me best as founder and managing editor of Tekrati, Inc.

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Solid research is the only way to cut through the chatter about identifying and prioritizing influencers for word-of-mouth marketing and other forms of influencer marketing. Mike Gotta (Burton Group / Gartner ) yesterday pointed out a just such a study, from the pharma industry. I like this study because it focuses on finding the hidden opinion leaders who drive the first wave of word-of-mouth product referrals.

The study identifies two distinct types of opinion leaders among the target physicians:

  • those who are trusted and respected by peers (called sociometric leaders)
  • those physicians who think of themselves as well connected and influential (called self-reported opinion leaders)

The opinion leaders identified by their peers are not the traditional targets pursued by marketers. If anything, they contradict current marketing wisdom about influencers and influentials. They are not overtly well connected, outgoing or high profile in terms of being published or public speakers.

Three nuggets to think about:

The study finds little overlap between the two types of influencers. Physicians fell into one group or the other.

The under-the-radar opinion leaders are quicker to use new product and more likely to influencer others to try it. This finding is based on matching network data with perscription records.

The under-the-radar sociometric opinion leaders are more interested in what their peers are doing, and are more open to word-of-mouth or social influence, than the self-reported opinion leaders.

Both types of opinion leaders play important roles in robust influencer marketing programs. One group is not better than the other; they’re just different kinds of people. The best course of action is to identify and address both types of opinion leaders. That means doing more research and more segmentation.

Useful links:
Hat tip: Mike Gotta
Study: Opinion Leadership and Social Contagion in New Product Diffusion – by Raghuram Iyengar, Christophe Van den Bulte, and Thomas Valente, 2008
Summary of Study: Knowledge@Wharton

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Sourcing and advisory panel at IIAR London Forum in January

The next IIAR London Forum will be on January 28th starting at 3:45 p.m. GMT.

For this event, we’re delighted to welcome a panel of sourcing and advisory firms, including Alsbridge, Equaterra, and TPI. Forums are open to all IIAR members. A limited number of guest places are available for those who have not previously been to an IIAR event.

For more information, please contact IIAR Secretary Hannah Kirkman at hkirkman (at) analystrelations (dot) org.

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Best practice AR at the Mobile World Congress: panel discussion highlights

Yesterday the IIAR had a great turn-out for its teleconference on best practice analyst relations at the Mobile World Congress this February in Barcelona.

The discussion was exceptional and the featured panelists included:

• AMDOCS, Brian McManus
• CCS Insight, Ben Wood
• Ericsson, Peter Olofsson
• Vodafone, Janine Aitken-Young.

Here are some of the highlights from the discussion:

• Every analyst attending gets hundreds of requests for meet ups. Resources don’t exist for every analyst to meet with every vendor
• MWC is for analyst meetings not analyst briefings. Pre-brief analysts about news and then arrange 15 minute catch up meetings at the MWC
• Logistics are extremely challenging at the MWC. Pre-planning and spokesperson preparation is essential; allow time in between meetings
• Check the time you are allowed into the conference before scheduling breakfast meetings
• Use multiple ways to evaluate AR success at the event
• Be ready to fact check as analysts are writing blogs and reports on tight deadlines
• Don’t plan meet ups with analysts at social events and don’t plan on analysts attending social events unless there’s a big ‘hook’
• 80% of what’s discussed with an analyst at the MWC is forgotten

All in all a very useful discussion and thanks again to the panelists for their participation.

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Next IIAR Discussion Group call on Escalating Research Disagreements

Our next monthly discussion group teleconference is next Tuesday, December 15th, on the topic of best practices in escalating research disagreements.

The call will be lead by Peggy O’Neill, who recently authored a Best Practice white paper on this topic for the IIAR.

IIAR members who would like to join the call, please contact Hannah Kirkman for dial in details.

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Gartner buys AMR -what’s the impact for AR Managers and competitors?

AMR Research. Bold Ideas. Compelling Research. Pragmatic Advice.The Twitter underworld is in ebullition this afternoon and the West Coast isn’t yet awake: the consolidation mouvement in the IT Analysis Industrys keeps steamrolling, the latest one to be picked up being AMR Research -by Gartner (NYSE:IT):

@iiar: RT @Gartner_inc: Gartner enters into Agreement to Acquire AMR Research, Inc. http://bit.ly/71BFeq

Nothing on the AMR site yet, just this press release on the Gartner web site, with the following facts:

  • Price: $64m
  • AMR 2009 revenues: $40 million
  • Rationale: it’s complementary  as one would expect -“AMR Research is expected to expand Gartner’s suite of research offerings and also complement its consulting and events businesses.  Moreover, the addition of AMR Research’s experienced sales team should enhance Gartner’s ability to further penetrate the vast market opportunity for syndicated research.  The combination is also expected to drive operational efficiencies and cost savings.”
  • Product fit: “[AMR] is the market leader for research related to supply chain management, which is inextricably linked to IT and has become a central and growing issue for many organizations.  We expect the acquisition to give us immediate presence in this market and the ability to generate substantial synergies by selling AMR Research products to Gartner clients and Gartner products to AMR Research clients.  The addition of AMR Research’s team of approximately 40 research analysts and 45 sales executives should enable us to offer expanded resources to our clients and increase our opportunities for growth.”
  • Financials: the transaction is expected to be dilutive to EPS by -$0.11 to -$0.09 FY10 ; accretive to EPS by $0.01 to $0.04 in FY11.


Impact for AR Managers:

  • Positive: this will broaden the Gartner portfolio and help AMR reaching further geographically and deeper into accounts, leveraging Gartner’s infrastructure and sales
  • Negative: this will reduce negotiation levers for IT vendors as well as competition in Applications Software IT research
  • Collateral impact: a larger Gartner offering may be a threat for Forrester (NASDAQ:FORR), Ovum-Datamonitor and other IT Analysis Firms as well as an opportunity to fulfill the “alternative opinion” and possibly hire seasonned and connected AMR analysts

Tell us what you think!

AR Managers, how do you see this impacting your role?

Gartner competitors, how do you position yourselves on this?

Take our poll:


UPDATES 1/12/09:

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New IIAR Best Practices Paper on AR Measurement

With AR budgets ever under pressure and AR as a discipline moving increasingly towards a shared-risk/rewards engagement model with the analysts, what should AR measurement look like? Is there still a place for measuring pure operational activity or should the AR community be looking more towards demonstrating its strategic contribution to the business, and measuring real impact on the sales cycle?

This new IIAR Best Practices paper by Ellie Warner (LinkedIn@elliewarner) provides plenty of vendor and service provider examples, tips and food for thought for AR professionals wanting to build or improve their AR measurement programs. Available to IIAR members to download free-of-charge from the IIAR website at www.analystrelations.org it can be viewed and downloaded by going to Library -> Best Practice White Papers and Teleconferences -> White Papers.

The link for IIAR members is here.

Should we be asking the analyst community, or is it up to us to define our picture of success? Operational or outcome-based: what does your AR measurement program look like? What best practices would you like to share with your peers?

Must reads for IIAR Members

Other posts from CC Group

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New IIAR Best Practices paper about escalating research disagreements available

The latest IIAR Best Practices paper is out – “Best Practices for Escalating Research Disagreements” reviews techniques and tips for avoiding and escalating disagreements over research. It includes interviews with AR practitioners and briefly outlines the escalation processes for Gartner, Forrester, IDC and Ovum.

The paper is available to IIAR members to download free-of-charge from the IIAR website at www.analystrelations.org. To view and download, go to Library -> IIAR Best Practice Library -> Dealing with Analyst Issues (here).

What are your views on escalating research? Do most AR managers have experience in this area? Or is it something you learn on the job, trial by fire?

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Next IIAR Discussion Group call on AR in Asia-Pac

Our next monthly IIAR Discussion Group teleconference is this Wednesday, November 25th, on the topic of analyst relations in Asia-Pacific.

This call will be lead by Pia Langstrom and will discuss issues such as cultural differences across Asia Pacific, APAC analysts and analyst firms, and what’s required to set up an AR programme in this region.  Pia is currently authoring a Best Practices Paper on this subject for the IIAR.

IIAR members who would like to join the call, please contact Hannah Kirkman for dial in details.

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Around Carsten Schmidt from HENRY Corporation in 10 questions

Carsten SchmidtCarsten Schmidt and other IDC Alumni recently formed Henry Corporation as a network of analysts offering strategic advice and marketing services to IT vendors, including Martin Hingley. Read Carter’s post for more background.

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    At HENRY I manage the commercial communication with our clients and project manage larger and cross-country projects.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    A marketplace assumes sellers and buyers. Frankly, I see the buyers pulling out because of the vast availability of free information and alternate sources. Secondly analysis and marketplace are contradicting forces if we hold on to the belief that analysis is an objective or even scientific process as opposed to the notion of a marketplace. There’re numerous examples how research firms productize their analysis. By doing that information transforms from research to marketing. There’s nothing wrong (or “magic”) about that as long as we stop calling it research.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    I communicate a lot, either by email, phone or blogs. My role is to be proactive towards HENRY’s clients, the IT vendors. I spend most mornings planning my day and prioritizing my approach. I care a lot about not wasting other people’s time. I firmly believe in business relationships that are mutually sensible meaning having the respect and interest in your client’s goals and objectives. Talking to people I never think what I can get out of it, but how it can benefit the other part. Experience has taught me that this approach is the most rewarding in the long run.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    AR’s are marketers and part of the marketing ecosystem together with research analysts and sales and marketing people. Most ARs know that which helps communication and facilitate exchange of information. It is only when AR’s commence pre-assessing the purpose of your approach that the AR misunderstands their role.
  5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model? (where are your revenues coming from, mix between users and vendors?)
    Our revenue comes solely from vendors. And we are in the business of helping building pipe lines by providing lead generation on behalf of the IT vendors. This is no different from our research colleagues in the industry apart from the fact that we communicate it in the open. World business as such is becoming more and more verticalized wherefore in-depth understanding of the IT business is a prerequisite for providing tactical marketing services. Research is used as a tool in one-on-one projects and as a foundation for offering the right tactical approach. Consequently we do not believe in published qualitative research reports as they are by nature  strongly biased toward the intended buying audience.
  6. What is your research methodology, in 255 characters or less?  (primary research, F2F or phone, secondary only, etc…)
    Qualitative research must by default be primary. If not I’d call it journalism. Quantitative data can easily come from public available sources as long as you are a skilled analyst able to verify and see behind the data. HENRY only partner with highly experienced analysts as you will know from our website.
  7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
    IBM’s Carsten Grønning is a great representative for the AR community. Forward coming, helpful, proactive and knowledgeable.
  8. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
    As long as the relationship is mutually sensible any AR practice and activity is good, simply because proactivity is beneficial and time saving for both the research company and the IT vendor.
  9. What are your offerings and key deliverables?
    HENRY has three offerings, Research-, Activate- and Event-related. We consider research as an integral part of the marketing value chain which real  purpose obviously is to improve market shares. We embrace that value chain by focusing at the ultimate goal for our clients, the IT vendors.
  10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    Strategy work at IT vendors are being centralized at headquarters. That has been a trend for years now. Secondly still more marketing money are spend closer to the clients at the expense of market intelligence. Our challenge is to communicate this trend to our prospect clients and to offer marketing services that are closer to our clients customers.
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IIAR Launches Certification for Analyst Relations Managers

Have you ever been embarrassed by a fellow AR manager? Some clueless person who purports to represent our profession and has not the slightest idea about the difference between an inquiry and a briefing? Or thinks the more you pay an analyst, the better the coverage will be?

Not much you can do about it, as anyone can hang out a shingle and call themselves an analyst relations manager. But at least those of us who take our profession seriously can push for high standards and look for ways to separate the amateurs from the pros.

The basic certification test that IIAR is launching today (read the official press release) will hopefully enjoy widespread adoption and become a way for hiring managers to differentiate between the poseurs and the pros. The IIAR is also looking at advanced certification requirements and will roll that out at a later date.

It’s the first time we are trying to answer the question, “What are the basics that an AR manager should know?”  The exam covers topics such as citation policies, market share methodology, analyst etiquette, and event best practices. Regional knowledge, business model basics, and pricing and licensing fundamentals are also in there.

Not sure if you’re ready? Sample questions and a quiz are available here.

Candidates interested in taking the exam should make arrangements by contacting me directly at peggy.oneill@analystrelations.org as passwords are distributed individually.

What do you think? Is certification helpful in promoting higher standards in our profession? Should it be mandatory instead of voluntary?

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Next IIAR discussion group on Managing the Forrester Wave

Tomorrow, we’ll be holding our regular discussion group call, and this month the topic is ‘Managing the Forrester Wave’. The session will be led by Peggy O’Neill, who recently authored a white paper for the IIAR on this subject. IIAR members who would like to join the discussion, please contact IIAR Secretary, Hannah Kirkman. Details of upcoming events can be found on the events calendar.

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The IIAR annnounces its new Board

London, 24/09/09 – The IIAR is delighted to announce that its new Board for 2009/10 has been elected as follows:

Thank you to David Rossiter and Sally Elliott for their contribution to the last board, as well as to Hannah Kirkman, our secretary.

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An update from Ovum

Since the last post I wrote on Datamonitor/Ovum/Butler after Mark Meek and David Mitchell came to present at the IIAR London Forum, they have been busy streamlining the organisation and bring together their research products.

I’ve had many conversations with them, and as far as I can tell, they seem to be executing well:

– As promised, the IT brands have all been consolidated under Ovum. Datamonitor provides the line-of business/non-IT research and Orbys provides sourcing research. Butler events are to be co-branded, as Ovum Butler.

– Clients should now have a single sales rep, apart from large international clients where it makes sense to have sales representatives in each market e.g. US and EMEA

– The research portfolio is being consolidated, and new research will all be in a consistent format. This process will take place over the next 3 months or so

– There will be a single team of analysts, with topic coverage areas grouped by horizontal technologies and services under Tim Jennings and the verticals under Ian Charlesworth

– The telco is pretty much unchanged, apart from the addition of a new set of contact centre research

Ovum’s running a webinar tomorrow; I’ve pasted the invite below with their permission.

What do you think?

Ovum Ovum
Imagine a technology analyst firm that understands the specific business issues of your industryWelcome to the new world of Collaborative Intelligence

As of today Ovum has integrated it’s IT offering with Datamonitor Technology and Butler Group creating a single, more powerful research partner under the Ovum brand. In addition Ovum’s 150+ ICT analysts will be working side-by-side with the Datamonitor Group’s 350+ business analysts – an approach which we call Collaborative Intelligence.

This Collaborative Intelligence approach will produce research and analysis that tackles the problem of the business value of IT.

Collaborative Intelligence

Attend our online launch webinar
Dial in and find out why SageCircle – Analysts of Analysts – say “The reorganization shows real promise to shake up the analyst market”.

Join David Mitchell, Ian Charlesworth and Tim Jennings, Directors of technology research who will introduce the new research agenda, Collaborative Intelligence philosophy and how it will benefit your company.

Wednesday 23rd September – 2.30pm GMT, Daylight Time (GMT +1, London)/8.30am EST – Book now >>

http://www.uptilt.com/images/mlopen_post.html?rtr=on&siteid=13120&mid=2098119&mlid=61772&uid=6123813127

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Ray Wang named IIAR Analyst of the Year 2009

London, 25 August 2009: The Institute of Industry Analyst Relations (IIAR) today named Ray Wang, most recently Vice President, Principal Analyst with Forrester Research Inc., as its Analyst of the Year for the second year running. Ray was nominated by a global survey of 137 analyst relations professionals. Runners up for the title were Jon Collins of Freeform Dynamics and David Mitchell of Ovum. Jon Collins of Freeform Dynamics was voted the EMEA Analyst of the Year. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given an industry-wide retrenchment in IT research spending, the traditional global analyst firms performed very strongly this year. Gartner, Forrester Research and IDC were ranked first, second and third respectively in the Analyst Firm of the Year category. The three firms were also highly rated in terms of their importance, achieving top three places in five of the nine industry segments. Nevertheless, boutique firms and specialists, particularly those based in Europe, also managed to hold their own in a tough economic environment. Freeform Dynamics, RedMonk and Quocirca all appeared in the top five Analyst Firm of the Year in EMEA, and their analysts scored highly in terms of importance in SMB, developer/IT Pro and Software, and green IT/sustainability, respectively. What do AR professionals most value when working with analysts? In addition to knowledge and market insight, flexibility in approach, responsiveness and willingness to listen all scored highly. “At a time when vendors are having to evaluate carefully where they should invest their limited funds, it is refreshing to see best-of-class analysts receiving recognition for the value they deliver.” said Jonny Bentwood, Board Member for the IIAR. “Now, more than ever before, analysts have to prove their tangible worth and those that provide independence, integrity, flexibility and deep industry knowledge of their specific areas are being recognised as true partners for vendors and IT buyers.”

Commenting on his award, Ray Wang said: “It’s a great honour to be recognised by the IIAR, especially in a year where clients challenge analysts to provide more actionable and personalised advice. As we rely more on social media tools to improve client delivery and outreach, I’m often reminded not to forget the other part of the equation – building strong relationships. In fact, the best AR pro’s I work with master the art of fostering strong relationships and understand that art often trumps science when dealing with people.”

A full list of the winners can be found at http://blog.analystrelations.org.

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AR professionals should canvass inside firms

It’s all too easy to assume that by briefing the lead analyst on a vendor or on a coverage area, your job as AR professional is done.

Don’t…

While some firms have robust sharing practices, such as repositories for presentations and vendor briefing teams that check which other analysts may be interested in a briefing, you can’t rely on those for the following reasons.

  • You know best what you’re trying to say.
    Vendor briefings follow the firms’ coverage model, and it usually works. However, you might want to brief some analysts in a “new” area, as you’re about to launch a new product or respond to new trends. Think for instance of Cisco entering the servers market, Oracle launching apps for the iPhone, etc…
  • Politics hinder the information flow Some topics breach the usual silos within analyst firms and as a result you need to brief several analysts. In an ideal world, we would all be working in happy-family-like-companies and all work together towards achieving the highest customer satisfaction. However, some analysts may not view positively others stepping on their coverage area while others may not spontaneously and proactively share the information. It’s not only job protection, it’s also the fact that they tend to have incredibly busy schedules, with some targeted to produce over 15 notes per year, in addition to the briefings, the sales calls, the events and the customer engagements.
  • Metrics can prevent analysts from collaborating
    The way people are incented can also play a role. In some firms analysts get more brownie points for notes they write solo (which is IMHO as perverse as incentives for long notes). So, do make sure you tell everyone what you’re up to to facilitate collaboration (but don’t force it).
  • The coverage model may not work for what you’re trying to say
    For instance, if your are doing AR for some products that are not part of a firm’s coverage map but may impact the edges of some analysts’ interest areas. There are also firms that have decided to cover “roles”, which can mean that they won’t effectively cover industries. In those cases, try to find a theme that’s of interest to some analysts or propose vertical case studies to horizontal analysts.

Key learning point: look further than the “obvious” analysts, remember your job is to sell ideas and not everyone’s buying off plans!

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The IIAR Analyst of the Year 2009

To take part in the ‘analyst of the year’ survey – click here

IIAR Analyst of the Year Last year, the IIAR ran a survey to identify who AR practitioners believe should win the award of ‘analyst of the year’ and ‘analyst firm of the year’. I am pleased to say that today, we are now launching the survey once again and hope that you can all take part.

This is your chance to vote for the analyst or firm who you believe deserves more recognition. All too often we only speak about analysts when we want something, but this survey gives you the opportunity to explain what criteria makes an analyst important and who you consider to be world-leaders for their segment.

The previous analyst of the year was Ray Wang, Principal Analyst with Forrester Research, Inc. Respondents praised his insight, depth of industry knowledge, and independent voice. Runners up for the title were David Mitchell of Ovum and James Governor of RedMonk. Ray was also named Analyst of the Year for the Americas, while David Mitchell of Ovum was voted the EMEA Analyst of the Year.

With respect to individual firms, Forrester was highly regarded by respondents in all regions, and was voted the Analyst Firm of the Year. It was commended for the strength of its analyst team, the quality of its client services and its ability to spot new trends. Gartner and IDC came second and third, respectively. Not only did the traditional global analyst firms perform well in the survey, but the smaller, boutique consultancies also scored highly. Freeform Dynamics and MWD came in the top five in EMEA with RedMonk in the top three in the Americas, and a number of other firms also received honourable mentions. Respondents liked their honesty, ability to innovate, the quality of their research and use of new media channels.

To see a copy of last year’s survey results click here for summary post or here for download.

For your benefit I have listed below a brief summary of the methodology used.

Methodology

1) Entrants:

This survey is open to anyone who works in analyst relations in any country, either in-house or at an agency/consultancy. In order for someone’s entry to be valid, you will need to submit your email address and company name to verify you are not an impostor trying to distort the results. (This happened last year from a global firm!!). The personal information will not be distributed or used beyond sending copies of the results to all participant. The survey will be open until the end of May. IP addresses will be taken to ensure that someone does not vote twice.

2) Questions:

The survey specifically focuses on an individual’s perception of the analyst world in 2008. Respondents are able to select from a pre-populated list of 501 firms which company they believe are the most important and relevant for a list of multiple segment areas.

3) Segmentation:

Respondents are able to specify their submissions based upon geography (US, EMEA, AsiaPac, Global), segment (Hardware, Software, Services, Communications and Networking, Green IT/Sustainability, Developer/IT Department) and customer-base (Enterprise, SMB and Consumer). Based upon these criteria further analysis could be made of the results to identify specific regional or segment champions.

If you have any questions or comments about this survey please contact either myself or Hannah Kirkman.

To take part in the ‘analyst of the year’ survey – click here

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MQs, accreditation and a debate on IT services – all in the same evening

Those of us fortunate enough to be able to attend* yesterday’s IIAR Forum enjoyed a treat.

Ed Gyurko presented the latest IIAR whitepaper on Magic Quadrant submissions (available from Monday, free of charge to members).  It will prove immensely useful to those who have to work on the seminal Gartner reports.

Following Ed was David Taylor who spoke about the IIAR’s plans for AR accreditation. These are really starting to take shape. David and the group he’s been working with deserve a lot of thanks for their hard work to date.   There’s more that still needs to be done – but it’s definitely getting there and that’s very exciting.

And then we had the third highlight of the meeting – a spirited and informative debate with analysts from three firms that are focused on the IT services market:  Kate Hanaghan of Bathwick, John Willmott from NelsonHall and Puni Rajah of TechMarketView (who was joined by her colleague Anthony Miller).

There are some clear differences between the three firms but all three are in agreement: relationships with clients are the key for success in the next 12 months.  There was also consensus that good analyst firms would survive but there would be casualties among those unable to demonstrate the value they deliver.

While all three acknowledged the difficulties of doing business in the current market, TechMarketView was very upbeat about the future.  Puni and Anthony are predicting that the overall analyst market will grow in size over the next year (and as a result, there will be more demand for AR people).  It will be nice if those predictions come true.

There was plenty more discussion and our hour was quickly over. If you couldn’t make it, then I’m sorry. You did miss a really good meeting.

Finally, thanks to our analyst speakers for coming along and taking part in an absolutely fascinating debate.

Also a big thank you to Robert De Souza who chaired the analyst discussion, Laura Woodward who hosted the meeting and Hannah Kirkman, the IIAR secretary for bring it all together.

* Attendees came from a wide range of companies including Accenture, BT, Capgemini, Cisco, CSC, CustomerClix, Edelman, HCL, Hill & Knowlton, Logicalis, Nortel, Oracle, Prasada, Richmond Green, Sunesis, Weber Shandwick and Zeus.

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International AR Best Practices: how to leverage all the good stuff out there

As a result of doing some research on International AR practices and gaining input during the January IIAR forum in London, the following paper on International Analyst Relations: Methodology and Best Practicesby Ellie Warner (LinkedIn@elliewarner)is now available to all IIAR members.

I was fortunate enough to be invited to attend and present at the IIAR Forum in London recently. One of the breakouts was on International AR. Even in the short time we had together, the kind of questions that were asked made me realize the advantages to be gained by documenting some of the more common best practices and methodologies for scaling AR efforts around the globe.

“So, how do you go about setting up country AR?”, “Which analyst-supported sales campaigns have had the most impact?” and “How can we ensure there is no overlap between the UK AR efforts and the corporate AR team?”

The discussion was inspiring.

Where do I start?

Working with AR services firms such as Intelligen, KCG, Lighthouse, Sage Circle and Sunesis is an obvious place to start. In addition, working to some kind of framework with defined stages and suggested best practices can be very effective, and take some of the pressure off overloaded AR practitioners

“International Analyst Relations: Methodology and Best Practices” (subscribers only) provides tons of usable material and ideas. There is no right or wrong way to scale AR efforts globally, but some are more effective, less costly and more replicable than others. Leveraging best practices and replicating successful initiatives also makes good business sense, especially in these times where budgets and resources are under more pressure than ever before.

What do you think?

Tell us what your experience of international AR is if you’re analyst or an AR professional. Would this fit into your company model and culture? Have you similar ideas you would like to share?

Why do International Analyst Relations matter? (subscribers only) looks at the business benefits and drivers for International AR in a separate white paper, also available to IIAR members.

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IIAR research highlights importance of International AR

As a result of doing some research on International AR practices and gaining input during the January IIAR forum in London, the following paper onWhy do International Analyst Relations matter? (subscribers only) is now available to all IIAR members.

As AR professionals, we all are familiar with the value and sales influence of industry analysts. It can sometimes be a hard sell internally, because for ethical reasons analysts do not speak about their end-user client engagements. But anecdotal evidence shows that IT analysts influence most, if not all, large deals

But can you articulate the value and business drivers of International AR?

How many of us can rattle off the main business benefits for complementing corporate AR with an International AR program? Do we know the most important business drivers for regional and country level AR? Do we all have visibility on the multiple ways in which analysts in Germany, India, Singapore, Brazil, and China are impacting vendor sales, marketing and strategy daily, not to mention the ways in which they influencing end user procurement decisions?

And most importantly, are our stakeholders aware of the potential negative impact on the sales pipeline by not having any global AR outreach?

Why do International Analyst Relations matter? aims to provide a balanced set of answers for all these questions, and more.

What do you think?

Tell us what your experience of international AR is if you’re analyst or an AR professional. Would this fit into your company model and culture? Have you similar ideas you would like to share?

For comments and input, please contact ewarner -at- analystrelations -dot- org.

Methodology and industry best practices for International AR is covered in a separate white paper, I’ll blog about this soon.

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