Tag Archives | IDC

Around Mike Fauscette from IDC in 10 questions

Michael Fauscette from IDCToday’s star analyst in our Around in 10 Questions series is Michael Fauscette who heads up IDC‘s enterprise software team. You can find Mike on Twitter under @mfauscette and on his blog www.mfauscette.com.

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    I run the Software Business Solutions Group at IDC which includes coverage on enterprise software: ERP, CRM, PLM, PPM, SCM, Collaboration and Social Software plus SaaS, Cloud, Open Source Software, Software pricing and licensing and software partners, channels and alliances. My personal research is mostly focused on emerging trends and hot topics in enterprise software which includes things like social business, the mobile enterprise, usability and cloud. Continue Reading →
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IDC Reveals its Global Strategy and Research Agendas at July IIAR London Forum

Martin Canning and Philippe de Marcillac, IDC 

The July IIAR London Forum, hosted by Waggoner-Edstrom in Covent Garden,  was well attended by IIAR members.  IDC analyst Martin Canning was joined by Philippe de Marcillac, Executive Vice President, International Business Units and provided valuable insight into IDCs global operations and coverage.

A full recap of the Forum is available to members here.  A special thanks goes Annemiek Hammelink, Waggener-Edstrom, for hosting the Forum, and to Charmain Chan (@CharmainChan) of Edelman for providing the minutes.

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July IIAR London Forum Features IDC Speaker

Our next IIAR London Forum is set for Tuesday, July 27th.  We are delighted to welcome guest analyst Martin Canning, Vice President  of IDC EMEA who will provide an update on strategy, research agendas, and how to best work with IDC. The Forum kicks off at 3:45 p.m. with a limited number of guest places  available for those who have not previously been to an IIAR event.

Members can register with the IIAR secretary jcourtenay (at) analystrelations . (org) and email questions to lleforestier at the same email domain.

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Around Martin Hingley from ITCandor in 10 questions

Martin Hingley is one of the best known analysts in Europe. He really came to prominence during his long stint at IDC where he was Chief Research Officer for EMEA.

Martin recently set up his own analyst firm, ITCandor.  On his blog, there’s lots more information and the useful, interesting insights you’d expect.

1. What are your coverage areas?
The ITC Downturn and Recovery– at the last IIAR meeting I attended, I predicted that the ITC recovery would be over on July 5th 2010 – I’m hoping you’re going to invite me back to remonstrate or congratulate.

Cloud Computing – I started looking at this way back in March 2008. I’ve spent much of the last year interviewing customers, small and large vendors and have published a number of popular posts and presentations.

Corporate And Social Responsibility – documenting the ‘unique practices’ large suppliers are pursuing in order to do some good to their stakeholders. I’ve been writing about social development activities in Africa, as well as the development of the ‘disposal channel’. Despite the failure of the Copenhagen summit this area is going to become increasingly vital.

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[GUEST POST] Briefing tips and best practices from Lisa Rowan / IDC

Analyst PhotoOur guest post today is from Lisa Rowan (@lisarowan), IDC’s Program Director for HR, Learning and Talent Strategies.  Read on for Lisa’s tips for briefing analysts from the analyst perspective.

There are excellent resources available to assist the AR profession including IIAR but on this side of the briefing table, it seems like that advice is not universally followed. As analysts we get a steady stream of requests for our time and often for a first introduction. I’d say that for the most part this goes well but there are some tips I thought might be worth underscoring to make the briefings effective for you and the analyst. For a lot of you, these might seem obvious but trust me that I wouldn’t write these tips if there weren’t situations where these things occur.
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Using a briefing request form to capture information for the sales force

I recently came across another blatant example of an analyst firm misusing the process by which analysts are invited to attend a vendor briefing.

I was looking to set up a briefing with IDC’s Energy Insights. Although the analyst had accepted the briefing, the company still wants me to complete this form. According to the group operations manager: “This is a standard company policy when requesting a briefing with our analysts.”

Now although it’s a pain, I don’t usually have a problem filling in vendor briefing request forms.

For those who aren’t familiar with them, these are normally used to capture information that will help:

  1. the firm ensure that all relevant analysts are aware of the request, and
  2. the analysts decide whether or not to accept a meeting.

But it’s a bit annoying when the analyst firm is using the process to capture information that is obviously more relevant for its sales force than the analysts.

For example, alongside the regular stuff (eg what’s the briefing about, who would it be with, tell us about your company), Energy Insights wants to know:

  • Who is the head of marketing for your company? (Name, title, email, and phone)
  • Who is the head of product marketing for your company? (Name, title, email, and phone)
  • Who is responsible for your company’s strategic planning? (Name, title, email, and phone)
  • Does your company use market research to assist in strategic planning?
  • Does your company currently have any relationships with other market research firms?
  • Would you be interested in learning more about our services in your market area and the benefits of having a relationship with Energy Insights?

Easy enough information to provide – but does an analyst at Energy Insights really need to know this information in order to qualify a meeting? I’d love to know.

Now if it’s for use by the sales force… well, that makes more sense. I can see why an analyst firm thinks it’s a smart idea to capture all this information. Lovely juicy contact data for the new business machine.

But IDC, why not be honest (and obviously honest) about why you want it. Otherwise, this feels a bit slimy and underhand.

Note
I checked the other IDC companies as well:

IDC itself requires a considerable amount of information but you can see that it would all be useful to the analyst team. It’s roughly in line with the information requested by Gartner. Forrester Research (registration required, but it’s free) and Yankee Group.

However, Manufacturing Insights, Financial Insights, Government Insights, Health Industry Insights and Global Retail Insights – well, they all demand the same information as Energy Insights.

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