Forrester – Institute of Industry Analyst Relations (IIAR) https://analystrelations.org The IIAR is a not-for-profit organisation established to raise awareness of analyst relations and the value of industry analysts, promote best practice amongst analyst relations professionals, enhance communication between analyst firms and vendors, and offer opportunities for AR practitioners to network with their industry peers. Thu, 16 Apr 2020 12:39:27 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 76177372 IIAR> Webinar: Forrester’s Evaluative Research Portfolio https://analystrelations.org/2020/03/10/iiar-webinar-forresters-evaluative-research-portfolio/ https://analystrelations.org/2020/03/10/iiar-webinar-forresters-evaluative-research-portfolio/#respond Tue, 10 Mar 2020 16:16:00 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=313856
Image source: https://go.forrester.com/blogs/

Join us for a presentation from Chris Andrews / VP Research Product Management, Forrester (bio, @chrisandrews50) for an overview of Forrester’s research portfolio.

Chris Andrews, VP Research Product Management

Hosted by Andrew Hsu (@andrew0hsuLinkedIn) and Anja Steinmann (@AnjaSteinmann, LinkedIn), Chris will share an overview of Forrester’s evaluative research portfolio. He’ll share tips for how analyst relations professionals can participate in these processes effectively and efficiently.

Following-up on the IIAR> Webinar: Forrester in 2020 this second webinar with Forrester, the IIAR> Analyst Firm of the Year 2019, this webinar will provide AR pros with the information they need to plan strategic and impactful engagements with Forrester this year. We hope you’ll join us!

This webinar will provide AR pros with the information they need to better understand Forrester’s research portfolio. We hope you’ll join us!

Date: 15th April 2020

Time: 1600pm GMT / 1700pm CET / 0700 PDT / 1100 EDT

Location: Webinar > REGISTER

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IIAR> Webinar: Forrester in 2020 https://analystrelations.org/2020/02/18/iiar-webinar-forrester-in-2020/ https://analystrelations.org/2020/02/18/iiar-webinar-forrester-in-2020/#comments Tue, 18 Feb 2020 21:06:41 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=313822
Forrester social image

Join us for a presentation from Sharyn Leaver / SVP, Research for Forrester’s 2020 plans.

Hosted by Andrew Hsu (@andrew0hsu, LinkedIn) and Aniruddho Mukherjee (@aniruddho, LinkedIn), Sharyn (bio, @sharynleaver) will share Forrester’s big research themes for 2020, as well as how they are refreshing events. Plus, she’ll touch on analyst momentum and what it means for AR.

The first of a series of two webinars with Forrester, the IIAR> Analyst Firm of the Year 2019, this webinar will provide AR pros with the information they need to plan strategic and impactful engagements with Forrester this year. We hope you’ll join us!

Date: 5th March 2020

Time: 1600pm GMT / 1700pm CET / 0700 PDT / 1100 EDT

Location: Webinar > REGISTER

Other posts on Forrester

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A turn of the tides? The IIAR> Analyst and Firm Of The Year 2019 https://analystrelations.org/2019/11/27/a-turn-of-the-tides-the-iiar-analyst-and-firm-of-the-year-2019/ https://analystrelations.org/2019/11/27/a-turn-of-the-tides-the-iiar-analyst-and-firm-of-the-year-2019/#comments Wed, 27 Nov 2019 19:45:00 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=312276 London, Wednesday 27th November 2019. At the IIAR> we believe in taking a stance and recognising greatness when we see it -an approach we find more impactful than sprinkling awards to dozens of “winners”. 

Today, at the IIAR> London Christmas Party kindly sponsored by HCL, we celebrated the top industry analysts and firms of the year. The IIAR> surveyed analyst relations professionals globally and from diverse industries, predictably casting a wide net on coverage areas. The evaluation used the IIAR SOSM methodology, to reflect the best practice promoted within the IIAR> looking at not only perceived sales impact, but also strategic insights, resonance in the media and ease of doing business with.

This year, analyst relations (AR) professionals have voted and provided clear insights both on the value they see from analysts, as well as how they perceive industry analyst firms’ value to them as clients. There were some interesting shifts in the 2019 results compared to prior years…read on to learn more! 

Without further ado, the Analyst Relations community has spoken and the winners are….

IIAR> New Analyst Of The Year 2019

IIAR> New Analyst of the Year 2019

IIAR members were again asked to identify fresh talent within the analyst community. We asked you to call out your IIAR ‘New Analyst of the Year’ nominations and we are delighted to announce: 

IIAR> New Analyst of the Year 2019:
Eric Schmitt / Gartner (LinkedIn), covering AdTech. 

AR pros commented that Eric “got up and running really quickly and always strives to deliver best value.

The runner ups are Mark Harris / Gartner (LinkedIn) covering security, and Erica Spinoni / IDC (LinkedIn, @SpinoniErica) covering AI, Scott Wilkinson / Cignal AI (LinkedIn, @ScottWilkinsonQ) covering Optical transport and networking, Jason Cerrato / Gartner (LinkedIn, @JasonACerrato) covering HCM, Knud Lueth / IoT Analytics covering, you’ve guessed it, IoT.

IIAR> Analyst Of The Year 2019

The IIAR> Analyst Of The Year 2019

The overall winner of the IIAR> Analyst Of The Year 2019 is Frances Karamouzis, Chief of Research and Distinguished VP Analyst / Gartner (LinkedIn, @Fran_Gartner), covering sourcing strategies for business and IT services. Respondents consistently commented on Frances’ “Exceptional understanding of the market dynamics and its ecosystem players, with strong influence in engaging with C-Suite decision makers.” 

#GRATEFUL.   Its humbling to be recognized for this award as analysts are constantly in the company of amazing minds.  And most of all, this includes all of my teammates and colleagues. Any award of this type is tribute to the team rather than any one individual.

Frances Karamouzis / Gartner, IIAR> Analyst Of The Year 2019

She is followed in second position by Dan Bieler, Principal Analyst / Forrester (LinkedIn, @DSBieler) covering digital platforms and business innovation strategies, who commented:

“A great working relationship with AR professionals is essential to get the work of an industry analyst done. Many thanks for the trust that we have built over many years.”

Dan Bieler / Forrester

See also Dan’s 2016 IIAR> Around in 10 Questions interview.

In third place comes Nick McQuire, Vice President, Enterprise Research / CCS Insight (LinkedIn, @nickmcquire) said:

“Thrilled and honored to be among the analysts recognized in the IIAR’s 2019 Analyst of the Year nominations. This is 100% down to our fantastic clients and the superb team we have at CCS Insight. Our research is laser focused on helping our clients assess key market trends, understand the implications for their businesses and above all, succeed with customers. The wonderfully close and productive partnerships we have within the AR community helps make this possible.” 

Nick McQuire / CCS Insight

Bindi Bhullar, Senior Director Analyst at Gartner (LinkedIn), and Phil Fersht, CEO and Chief Analyst at HfS Research (LinkedIn, @pfersht) round out the top 5 nominations for the 2019 IIAR> Analyst of the Year awards and were also recognised for their research and contributions. There were many nominations from the AR community this year, but these 5 analysts were most often called out for providing consistent value by the AR community. 

IIAR> Analyst Firm Of The Year 2019

The IIAR> Analyst Firm Of The Year 2019

This year’s Analyst Firm of the Year award was hotly contested. After four years in the lead with IDC and Forrester jockeying for second place on the podium, it was interesting to see Gartner moved down to third place. We’ve redone the maths several times but it was the verbatim comments which shed some light on AR professionals’ lost love for the industry research behemoth. Whilst Gartner is still recognised for its breadth of analyst coverage and overall impact, with many analysts being commended for their individual work, survey feedback indicated Gartner as an organisation has become increasingly more difficult to work with, attracting severe criticism on overall client experience from in-house analyst relation professionals. 

The IIAR> Firm Of The Year 2019 is Forrester (website, @forrester).

Well done to Forrester for coming on top this year, earning praise from analyst relations professionals for its thought leadership and agility.

Ludovic Leforestier / IIAR> Board Member

In second place comes IDC (website, @IDC).

In third place, we have Gartner (website, @gartner_inc) 

In fourth position is HFS Research (website, @HFSResearch)

And in fifth place, 451 Research (website, @451Research)

Other Analyst Nominations

Most impactful analyst – Has significant impact on sales and end-user buyer preferences: Donald Feinberg / Gartner (LinkedIn, @Brazingo)

Most insightful analyst – Continuously delivers thought provoking industry insights in research: Ted Schadler / Forrester (LinkedIn, @TedSchadler)

Best project results – Consistently delivers sound, practical advice and results for their clients: Adam Ronthal / Gartner (LinkedIn, @ARonthal)

Most social influence – Broad reach within social channels and communities: Ray Wang / Constellation (LinkedIn, @rwang0)

IIAR> Client Partner Of The Year 2019

IIAR> Client Partner Of The Year 2019

The IIAR> Client Partner Of The Year 2019 is David Stanley / Constellation (LinkedIn, @kiwigate), whom members said they appreciate his collaboration as he, “really looks to deliver clear business value” and is a true partner. Special mention from the IIAR> Awards Committee for the best LinkedIn banner as well…

The runner-ups were: Jeremy Green / IDC (LinkedIn, @JeremyG86006699) and Erna Begic / Forrester (LinkedIn).

Congratulations to everyone who has been recognized by the IIAR community – and thanks to the AR professionals for taking the time to vote. Here’s to continued engagement between industry analysts and the community of AR professionals  in 2020!

Stephanie Look / IIAR> Awards Committee

IIAR> Webinar: results from the AOTY 2019 survey

IIAR> members will be able to dial in the webinar presenting detailed results on the 13th December 0800 PST / 1100 EST / 1600 GMT / 1700 CET > register here.

The IIAR> Awards Committee

Previous IIAR Analysts and Firms Of The Year

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The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2018 https://analystrelations.org/2019/10/11/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-2018/ https://analystrelations.org/2019/10/11/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-2018/#comments Fri, 11 Oct 2019 17:49:36 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=311306 Fashionably late but always on point and by popular request here’s the IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2018, a representation of how Analyst Relations Professionals (AR Pros) have rated analyst firms in the 2018 survey we ran for the Analyst and Firm of the Year 2018.

For new readers here, the Tragic Quadrant is of course a pun on the infamous GartnerMagic Quadrant’. We do not pretend this as an exhaustive analysis -nor is it a completely serious piece of research (the “Tragic” moniker is there as a reminiscence it should be taken with a pinch of salt). Nonetheless it is based on data and, as opposed to the Gartner Magic Quadrant, there are no magical and secretive weightings. As such, it is a good indication going back several years of the changes afoot in the industry analyst landscape and the judgement analyst relations professionals cast on industry research firms. And it provides actionable insights AR pros can use, something other surveys in this field often lack.

The ‘AOTY‘ survey allowed us to collect data on AR pros’ preferred industry analysis firms, which we group in three composite indicators:

  • Impact as plotted on the Y axis is a relative position of firms based on how AR pros view their ‘Impact’ on purchase decision and moreover on the ecosystem at large. This also relates to their perceived credibility and capability to provide an objective opinion.
  • Relevance on the X axis is the relative position of analyst firms as seen by AR for relevance in their own ecosystems, including capability to cover the market, technologies and geography. It also covers the depth of expertise of analysts.
  • Interaction is the size each bubble, translating how it is easy to do business with each firm according to AR pros. The smaller the bubble, the harder it is to work with the firm. This is also a relative rating.

Without further ado, here is the 2018 IIAR Tragic Quadrant, presenting some big surprises this year as you can see from below.

IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2018 v04
The IIAR> Tragic Quadrant 2018

My comments on these results… but your guess is as good as mine.

On relevance (horizontal axis), it seems it pays for firms to be specialised or focussed on a specific expertise area accorded to AR pros, something that should be put in perspective by the fact those very specialised firms attracted less nominations. The larger firms are relevant by virtues of coverage and space, Forrester being on the left of Gartner having de-focussed from IT is probably the counter example.

Impact presents a more curious picture, with 451 clearly also benefiting from having a laser-focus on its enterprise audience for instance. It’s worth noting that this is a survey of AR professionals and not an actual measure of impact on sales or otherwise.

The most revealing dimension is the ease to do business with, where AR pros rate the leading industry analysis firm, Gartner, much lower for ease to do business with. We’re seeing a net regression there this year, maybe as Gartner is its increased domination on the market to impose rigid practices and T&C’s? Everest is perplexing as their size should make them more amenable. We would caution firms to watch this indicator as we said last year:

Analyst firms might also use this tool to monitor the ‘transactional tax’ that they impose on analyst relations professionals. If they raise the ‘interaction barrier’ too high (e.g. make it too difficult for analyst relations professionals to interact with them) while not providing sufficient coverage and showing impact, this could affect their vendor information source. They may be left with only a partial view of the market (raising exhaustivity and fairness issues). Finally, their vendor revenues might suffer too.

Neil Pollock, The IIAR Tragic Quadrant for 2017

Also worthy of a mention, is besides the ‘historic’ firms 451 Research, ESG, Everest Group, Forrester, Gartner, HfS Research, IDC, Kuppinger Cole & Partner, NelsonHall, Ovum and the well publicised ZK Research, we find relatively new firms:

Bottom line

Analyst relations professionals should watch closely the ecosystem and balance their efforts towards firms that are relevant in their space, have more impact on the goals they pursue (see the AR SOSM model) and arbitrage budgets to deliver better value for money, avoid friction and un-necessary ‘transactional taxes.’

By Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn@lludovic).

Related posts:

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[GUEST POST] Do’s And Don’ts For Analyst Interactions by Chase Cunningham / Forrester https://analystrelations.org/2019/10/08/guest-post-dos-and-donts-for-analyst-interactions-by-chase-cunningham-forrester/ https://analystrelations.org/2019/10/08/guest-post-dos-and-donts-for-analyst-interactions-by-chase-cunningham-forrester/#respond Tue, 08 Oct 2019 10:51:06 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=311225
Chase Cunningham, Principal Analyst, Forrester

Having just been through an onslaught of work related to the Forrester Wave™ evaluation on Zero Trust eXtended ecosystem platform providers, I think that it’s worthwhile to put some guidance out there that might help folks as they interact with analysts (well, me, mainly, but maybe it will help with others, as well). And a disclaimer: I don’t actively work with folks at other analyst firms, so take my humble advice here with a grain of salt; every analyst is a bit different, and each firm has its own way of doing things.

Do’s:

  1. Have a specific set of slides for the briefing. Focus on the way you solve whatever problem you solve. I want to know how your specific solution helps the end user be more secure.
  2. Move quickly through the company stuff. Yes, I want to know about your company and the super awesome folks that work there, but in truth, I am most focused on how your solution does what it does. Introduce the folks and the pertinent facts about the company in less than two slides and move on.
  3. Keep a cadence. If you really want to engage and work with an analyst, then you have to keep the pace up. If you brief me once a year, expect a once-a-year interaction. Some of us do a few hundred of these during the year; we get saturated with all of the interactions with those groups that do keep a regular cadence, and that means that if you don’t keep up, it’s likely something important gets lost in the mix.
  4. Any company can do a briefing (with me, at least). There is a big market out there and many different ways to address the problems we face; if you have a better mousetrap, please brief me. It doesn’t cost you a thing but time (but please see point No. 1 here before doing the briefing).
  5. Set yourself up for success. If you don’t have folks that know the analyst interaction game, hire some or get in with an agency. The value that both of us get from this interaction comes from everyone being on point, and the skills needed to do this right can’t be overstated. Honestly, if you don’t have the specific experience and talent on staff, GET IT. And in my opinion, and from what others tell me, PR is different from AR. Don’t confuse the two.
  6. Do your research. We have specific coverage areas, and we publish research along those lines of coverage. It’s best you know what those areas are, and the best way to do that is to do your own research on the analysts you want to interact with. Do your homework, and know what the analyst cares about.

Don’ts:

  1. Just jump on a briefing and wing it. Don’t do that. It’s a waste of an opportunity for both of us, and to be frank, it makes me doubt how well things run at the company when something like a briefing isn’t handled professionally.
  2. Go nuclear. If your company is in on a Wave or some other evaluation and things don’t go your way, don’t take the nuclear option. Analysis is not personal, and we do months and months of analysis on a variety of items to come to that final evaluation point. If you go nuclear, it won’t work out the way you want, I promise you. If you have facts or something that is specific enough to possibly influence a change, then great, work through the proper channels and be professional, and let’s see where it goes.
  3. Confuse an investor deck with an analyst briefing. Investors look at the company and all the ins and outs of whether or not that potential investment might be worth it for them. They have specific criteria they are looking for; it’s different from what I or most other analysts I know are looking for. I have no money, seriously. So don’t try and brief me with an investor deck; I won’t invest (and technically, that would be illegal anyway, and I don’t look good in an orange jumpsuit), and most of the stuff an investor is looking for is way out of the vector of what I care about.
  4. Bash the competition or say you have none. If your approach to justifying the validity of your solution is based mostly on how crappy the rest of the market is and you spend your time just bashing the competition, that isn’t a good way to go about it. Sure, point out flaws in other solutions and discuss how you do things better. But don’t spend either of our time talking about how terrible everything else is. And no matter what, you have competition in some way. You may have the best mousetrap, sure, but somehow, someway, you have a competitor, period.

The last thing that I think is worth being aware of is that the purpose of the evaluative reports we do is to help our end users know more about what solutions might help them solve their problems. For me, I don’t do research on vendor solutions with the idea that my end goal is to rank them based on how nifty their technology is. I feel a sense of duty to make sure I spend time separating the use cases and details of those solutions based on their ability to help solve a problem. I honestly couldn’t care less about who comes out on top; it’s all about the benefit of that solution to those folks that are going to use it at the end of the day.

First posted on the 7th October 2019 by Dr. Chase Cunningham / Principal Analyst, Forrester (LinkedIn, @CynjaChaseC, bio) on his blog, reposted with his permission.

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My Take: Forrester Acquires Sirius Decisions https://analystrelations.org/2018/11/29/my-take-forrester-acquires-sirius-decisions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/11/29/my-take-forrester-acquires-sirius-decisions/#comments Thu, 29 Nov 2018 15:24:50 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=260464 forrester-siriusdecisions

This week, Forrester (Nasdaq: FORR) entered into a definitive agreement to acquire SiriusDecisions, for $245 million in cash. Larry Dignan at ZDNet did a great job breaking down the deal here. As with all acquisitions, many of the details have not been decided or announced yet, but as I long-time client of both firms, I wanted to share my perspective.

Is there overlap?
Yes, some, but not really. Whereas Forrester had doubled -down on CX – recently celebrating 20 years of CX Research, Sirius Decisions completely focused on BtoB Marketing. Their many marketing models, including the industry iconic demand waterfall, marketing processes and best practices have guided and been implemented by thousands of the best BtoB marketers. Sirius provided unique and very specific guidance and how to improve every aspect of BtoB Marketing from email to customer advisory boards to building partner programs and more. They always were able to share specific best practices and benchmark data.

I predict that the current Forrester B2B Marketing Team will have to restructure to support this influx. I also believe that the Forrester Tech Marketing Leadership Board (of which I have been a member) is going to get some amazing new talent.

What does this mean for their customers?
I think it will be great for Forrester’s customers especially as companies are aggressively trying to understand every element of prospect journeys. Sirius Decisions (SD) was very expensive when I was a client (worth the money – but challenging to get budget). Pricing and contracts are now going to be greatly simplified.

What does this mean for analysts?
There will be some cuts, but if marketing budgets stay where both firms have predicted, there is enough demand to support the onboarding of the analysts and their tremendous research.  Another element is culture; there is good cultural alignment here.  The SD analysts are passionate about excellence in marketing, and they are approachable leaders. Their collaborative styles are similar to Forrester’s.

What does this mean for Analyst Relations (AR)?
There are 2 sides to this equation. Most AR programs won’t change very much except that AR will now target the SD Analysts more. Lots of AR programs do not formally target Sirius Decisions. The other side is:  because SD focused on the BtoB Marketer, they had research to validate the AR program. Research that is challenging to get. For example, in recent SD Buying Study – “Analyst reports beat out sales presentations as the top content asset.”

Typically, research firm acquisitions are not good for AR; we are better when we have a wide pool of experts, but because of the nature of SD’s expertise, this may be the exception.

Members of the Forrester AR Council typically will get the opportunity to hear directly from George Colony on a deal this big, though the call hasn’t been scheduled yet. I’m looking forward to hearing directly from him and hearing your comments and questions. Please comment below.

More this month than ever, grateful to you for reading.

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Trio of analyst departures at Gartner underlines why backup strategy is so important https://analystrelations.org/2018/06/04/trio-of-analyst-departures-at-gartner-underlines-why-backup-strategy-is-so-important/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/06/04/trio-of-analyst-departures-at-gartner-underlines-why-backup-strategy-is-so-important/#respond Mon, 04 Jun 2018 15:16:48 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=235376 Gartner icon logo for the IIAR websiteGartner has been forced to delay a Magic Quadrant report for at least six months due to the mass departure of pivotal analysts covering the enterprise data center space. 

The delay followed news that analysts Dave Russell and Pushan Rinnen were leaving to join vendors. The duo were the mainstays of the Gartner team covering data backup. Their counterpart in the EMEA region, Robert Rhame, is also moving on.

Their timing was remarkable: Gartner was due to kick off research for its 2018 Magic Quadrant for Data Center Backup and Recovery Solutions last week. With all three authors choosing to leave Gartner, the firm had no credible option but to delay the start of the report: this is now on ice until 2019.

What is notable is that vendors were informed of the slew of departures by no other than Mike Harris, SVP and head of the IT Leaders and Technical Professionals research business within Gartner. Usually, these notifications come from a team MVP.

Gartner’s roster of analysts covering the data center infrastructure space has been steadily weakening over the past year, with the remaining analysts covering enterprise hardware under pressure not to attend vendor events. Instead, they are instructed to optimize their time to help end-user technology buyer customers – which effectively means blocking up to four-hour chunks in their daily calendar to field the high volume of inquiry calls.

The retirement of veteran guru data center analysts Andy Butler (October 2017) and George Weiss (May 2018) was already a blow, and recently, former EMC marketing exec turned analyst JP Corriveau handed in his notice, to return to the vendor side. Gartner also lost storage MVP Errol Rasit at the start of the year.

It’s two vendors who have led to this disruption within Gartner: Veeam and Rubrik. Both are cloud data management firms, which hints at the future direction of the backup market. Corriveau and Russell have joined privately-held Veeam, while Rinnen, Rhame and another former Gartner analyst Ray Schafer have joined Rubrik.

Any behind-the-scenes insights that these vendors hoped to have gained in how to wrangle the backup MQ now seem to be lost, since Gartner has put the refresh on hold for at least six months. That’s still quite an aggressive timescale, since the team of analysts taking over this beat will also want to adjust the MQ in line with their perceptions of changing market and customer needs.

More than just a change of schedule

However, for vendors, the MQ delay is more than a change of schedule. It means starting over in building relationships with the analysts who will take over one of the few remaining MQs in the hardware space. (Quadrants for servers and client computing devices have long been furloughed in favor of infrequently-updated Market Guides.)

In his mail to affected vendors, Gartner SVP Harris only scratches the surface of the impact of this treble whammy, noting: “This has been a difficult decision, especially given the time and resources invested in the process of communicating the included vendors’ respective value propositions.” That’s an understatement, since right now, Gartner will struggle to field those valuable backup-related inquiries from its enterprise subscribers, let alone start the task of updating a Magic Quadrant and the associated Critical Capabilities report.

Frustrated vendors won’t have much luck either if they turn to Forrester: in this space, Rich Fichera was the firm’s last analyst still covering data center hardware until he retired this spring.

This is an unprecedented opportunity for the smaller analyst firms in this space to take a bite from Gartner’s enormous slide of the pie. We’re expecting the charge will be led by the ever-competent Enterprise Strategy Group.

It’s also a great opportunity for smaller backup vendors to punch above their weight, by focusing on Gartner Peer Reviews. As the backup MQ gets long in the tooth, so buyers will be more swayed by reviews from their peers – especially with a shortfall of experienced, knowledgeable analysts at Gartner to explain the possible pitfalls. As a top executive at Gartner recently put it, “Using peer reviews is like driving with the rear view mirror… you need the analysts to spot the bend around the corner”.

If you want a clue as to what’s ahead, note that Veeam and Rubrik both focus on cloud-based storage and data management.

But it looks like a twisty road to recovery for Gartner.

By Simon Jones (@simondestrierLinkedIn), co-lead for the IIAR German Chapter. This article first appeared on Destrier’s blog.

 

Other posts on Gartner

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IIAR Discussion Group: negotiating with Forrester. Are you getting the best value from your contract? https://analystrelations.org/2018/04/04/iiar-discussion-group-negotiating-with-forrester-are-you-getting-the-best-value-from-your-contract/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/04/04/iiar-discussion-group-negotiating-with-forrester-are-you-getting-the-best-value-from-your-contract/#comments Wed, 04 Apr 2018 18:02:30 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=227785 Feeling the pinch in your negotiation with Forrester on your subscription contract?Do you feel comfortable in buying the multiple seats being pushed your way? Is Forrester covering the technology and business areas that are important for you?  You’re not alone – many of your peers and IIAR members have commented (see the IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2017)

IIAR negotiating with forrester. aniruddho Mukherjee, ludovic leforestier

Forrester seems to force sell multiple seats, TEIs etc during renewals. Forrester analysts may be amongst the top IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017 but is Forrester seeing an exodus of top talent? As per the IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2017 survey, AR professionals mentioned that they felt a flip flop in Forrester’s focus on various key topics and verticals. Also the research subscription costs seem to be increasing at 10-20% yoy. They also felt that while Forrester had some great visualisation of data BUT insights were focused on niche topics like Customer Experience, Business Technology, Software and Marketing. Many Wave’s have not been renewed while others are renewed in an irregular cycle.

In past 2 years, Forrester has invested in its Consulting Practice and has been advising many end users on sourcing and business strategy. As per the IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2017 survey, AR professionals mentioned a lack of transparency with vendor firms on the ways of working between Forrester analysts and Forrester Consulting.

Building on our previous conversations (see links below), the IIAR will host an in-depth discussion with IIAR members, looking at Forrester’s commercial practices and explore potential solutions.

Date: 26th April 2018

Location: Webinar > REGISTER here

London based member can attend in person > pls fill in form below (Holborn).
Time: 1600pm GMT / 1700pm CET / 0700 PDT / 1000 EDT

Held under Chatham House Rule the discussion will be chaired by Aniruddho Mukherjee (@aniruddho, LinkedIn), IIAR UK Co-Lead and Head of AR and Branding, Europe for HCL Technologies) and Ludovic Leforestier (@lludovic, LinkedIn, IIAR co-founder and Director Influencer Relations at Criteo).

Of course, by attending you will not only have the opportunity to give your knowledge and opinions but also gain from that of others and have the advantage to submit questions directly. Let us have a lively discussion, the more of you that join in the better, so please don’t forget to REGISTER. Attending IIAR Events is free and restricted to AR professionals active members of the IIAR. So if you work at an analyst firm, we request you save yourself some time, have a beer and chill.

IIAR will act as channel for anonymised and aggregated IIAR Member feedback to Industry Analyst firms. This is to provide an opportunity for Industry Analyst firms to present their responses to ensure balanced view of the topic being discussed and help the industry effectively address the issues raised.

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Who is the IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017? https://analystrelations.org/2017/12/01/211235/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/12/01/211235/#respond Fri, 01 Dec 2017 14:33:35 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=211235

The temperature may be dropping, but things have been heating up in the analyst community. Yes, it’s that time of year when we ask you to put the analysts themselves under the spotlight.

The 2017 IIAR Analyst of the Year Award nominations saw some hot competition, but inevitably there can be only one winner (well, actually we have three, but more about that shortly). Announced at the IIAR Christmas Party, kindly sponsored by Criteo, we celebrated the successes of some of the industry’s favourite thinkers and most serious strategists.

Recognising the voice of the analyst relations community

With the ever-diversifying tech landscape, the expertise and consultancy delivered by industry analysts gains a new stature. And so we spared no expense in interrogating the global analyst relations community as to the practitioners they most respect in their field.

We had responses from 13 countries, encompassing contributions from businesses under $50m right through to $multi-billion organisations. And as a result a wide array of analysts were recognised within the survey.

 

Drumroll please…

Prizes were awarded for the highest overall impact and relevance for the industry, whilst recognising how easy these analysts are to work with. The evaluation used the IIAR SOSM methodology, to reflect the best practice promoted within the IIAR. So with this context covered, we can get down to the nitty gritty and announce the winners…

This year’s winner of IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017 for Hardware is:

Jon Oltsik / ESG (LinkedIn, @joltsik)

 

Our winner of the IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017 for Software is:

Jost Hoppermann / Forrester (LinkedIn)

And the winner of IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017 in Services is:

Bill Martorelli / Forrester (LinkedIn, @BillMartorelli)

 

With this esteemed line up commended, it’s time to announce the overall Analyst of the Year Award for 2017. Recognised for his combination of strategic input to business outcomes, expertise in his field and overall quality of experience in working with him, we’re pleased to announce the winner of…

IIAR Analyst of the Year 2017 Overall

Bill Martorelli / Forrester

Huge congratulations Bill and well done on all the excellent work you’ve done with the IIAR community.

 

Recognising the evolving industry

IIAR members were also asked to identify fresh talent within the analyst community. We asked you to call out your ‘New Entrant of the Year’ nominations, and the response was so strong that we actually wanted to celebrate all of the nominees. So we’re delighted to commend the following analysts for making a great impact to our profession:

  • Mila D’Antonio / Ovum
  • Amanda LeClair / Forrester
  • Fernando Montenegro / 451 Research
  • Simon Abrahams / PAC
  • Meghna Mukerjee / Aite Group
  • Kiel Carlsson / Forrester

 

Sharing in success

Further to the individual analyst of the year, we also have our analyst firm of the year. This was a close-run competition, but in the end there was one that stood out.

This year’s IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2017 is 


Gartner

Well done to all of the Gartner team and thanks to Nick Jones for collecting the award.

 

Helping us create business value

This year we added a new category, to celebrate professionals also adding incredible value to AR. We’re delighted to announce that the inaugural 

IIAR 2017 Analyst Client Partner of the Year award goes to:

Anne Stevenson / IDC

Partnerships between AR professionals and the analyst firms with whom they work are a key part of our sector – in fact it can be the critical factor in creating business value. So well done to Anne for your contributions.

 

With that we come to a close for this year. Congratulations to everyone who has been recognised within the awards – and thanks to the AR professionals for taking the time to vote. Here’s to another great year in 2018.

 

By  (LinkedIn, @Tom_Buttle) and  (@aniruddho, LinkedIn)

IIAR AOTY Working Group

IIAR 2017 Xmas Party and Analyst of the Year 2017

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Crisp Research confirms position as rising star on the European AR scene with arrival of top analyst Stefan Ried https://analystrelations.org/2017/03/16/crisp-research-confirms-position-as-rising-star-on-the-european-ar-scene-with-arrival-of-top-analyst-stefan-ried/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/03/16/crisp-research-confirms-position-as-rising-star-on-the-european-ar-scene-with-arrival-of-top-analyst-stefan-ried/#respond Thu, 16 Mar 2017 21:15:32 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=162086 After spending the last couple of years working for a vendor, Dr. Stefan Ried is to rejoin the ranks of the industry analyst community – arriving in April as Principal Analyst and Practice Lead for IoT at German analyst and consultancy outfit Crisp Research. 

Crisp, founded by former Experton analysts Dr Carlo Velten and Steve Janata, now boasts 20 analysts and consultants. Offering a hybrid mix of research and consulting, the firm is considered by AR professionals to be a rising star on the German analyst scene, thanks in part to its accessibility and willingness to work with vendors.

By the time he left Forrester at the end of 2014, where he was a VP and Principal Analyst, Stefan Ried had spent seven years covering cloud computing strategy – watching the industry grow from its early days. At Crisp, he’ll lead a new Internet of Things (IoT) practice.


Ried’s arrival marks international growth aspirations for privately-held Crisp, headquartered in Kassel (mid-way between Frankfurt and Hanover). According to founder and COO Steve Janata, Ried will also “offer advisory services regarding architecture design and provider selection for user companies. This includes Blueprints, Best Practices and ‘hands-on’ Transformation Services along with large scale IoT-projects and new products.”

According to Ried, his reasons for returning to the analyst community include the job being “basically done” at vendor Unify, now the company is “stable, profitable, extremely innovative, sold & integrated into the larger ATOS group”. On joining Crisp, he says: “I need the challenge and love turning change into momentum.”

While criticizing his former employer Forrester and fellow “gorilla” Gartner for “missing the chance to reinvent their own business model”, Ried says of his new employer: “Crisp managed to build an appealing open content model and is really the place where vendors and users find research and advisory to CHANGE, INNOVATE and DISRUPT their industry.”

He adds: “Crisp Research is the ideal environment for me to provide these European companies and their global technology suppliers with the best research and advice on re-inventing their core business.” 

For AR professionals who don’t already have Crisp on their radar, this would be a good time to take a look – and start by lining up a vendor briefing. You’ll have to get in line though. Welcome back, Stefan. Your absence has been noted.

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The IIAR Tragic Quadrant for 2017 https://analystrelations.org/2017/02/24/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-for-2017/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/02/24/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-for-2017/#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2017 11:49:40 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=155166 Two years ago, in 2015, we produced the first IIAR Tragic Quadrant. It was met with much enthusiasm and comment, thus we have decided to repeat the exercise once again this year. Below we present the Tragic Quadrant for 2017. The Tragic Quadrant is compiled from data collected as part of the 2016 IIAR Analyst of the Year Survey, where, annually, we invite analyst relations professionals to rate individual industry analyst and the firms they work for. This year more than 100 different individual organisations responded to our survey. We were interested to see if we could do further analysis on the data that was collected.

In producing the Tragic Quadrant what we sought to do was to rank analyst firms according to three criteria. We chose these criteria because this is what the IIAR survey asks respondents to assess:

  • Impact: The Y axis depicts the ‘Impact’ of the industry analyst firm on the purchase decision. This also relates to their perceived credibility and capability to provide an objective opinion.
  • Relevance: The X axis marks their ‘Relevance’ for the purchase decision. This means their capability to cover the market and their specific geographical allocation. It also includes public recognition of their presence in the market (e.g. as an expert).
  • Interaction: The size of the bubble is ‘Interaction’. This relates to issues of communication (e.g. how easy is it to get to them and to talk to them).

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2017 featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, 451, Ovum, ESG, Machina, Crisp, Constellation, HfS

IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2017

We are able to represent the top 10 industry analyst firms according to this new analysis. Gartner is “up and to the right”, which means that it leads in terms of impacting purchase decisions and relevance (e.g. their analysts know their stuff).

However, the small size of its bubble indicates that analyst relations professionals think Gartner is amongst the hardest of analyst firms to do business with out of all the analyst firms represented. Close behind is Forrester and IDC. The size of IDC’s bubble merits attention, as it was reported to be “one of the most flexible firms” to deal with, to use the words of one of our respondents. All three firms more or less maintain the same ordinal position in the top right quadrant as last time (see the Tragic Quadrant for 2015 below).

Other notable developments is HfS which has improved its ‘relevance from the previous Tragic Quadrant but it is perceived to be slightly less impactful by analyst professionals. Ovum and 451 Research maintain more or less the same position with regard to the ‘Big 3’, but 451 has overtaken Ovum in terms of relevance, whilst Ovum has made a dramatic improvement in terms of ease of interaction. Constellation remains more or less in the same position as last time. New entrants this year into the Tragic Quadrant include Machina and Crisp Research, with the former, by some degree, perceived as the most flexible of analyst firms to work with by analyst relations professionals.

IIAR Tragic Quadrant for 2015

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

For those who have not come across the Tragic Quadrant before, it gets its name from the infamous GartnerMagic Quadrant’ of course. We see it as a kind of ‘Magic Quadrant of Magic Quadrant’. We are not claiming that it is the results of an exhaustive study. Nor do we pretend that the Tragic Quadrant is a completely serious piece of research. (There is a clue in the title “Tragic”). Nonetheless, we do think the data collected – and note, that we now have Analyst of the Year surveys stretching back several years – throw some interesting light both (a) onto the changing nature of the industry analyst landscape and (b) how analyst relations professionals view the analyst ecology. It is demonstrating that in engaging with analyst firms IT vendors are balancing the requirements for these firms to have ‘impact’, ‘relevance’ and to be ‘easy to work with’.

Analyst relations professionals could therefore use a tool like this to look at their target audience engagement strategies. It would encourage them to balance ‘ease to do business with’ against ‘relevance’ and ‘impact’. To say the same thing in different words, they shouldn’t brief analysts just because they’re easy to deal with. Or, conversely, they should approach those analysts which are less of a pain depending on the type of impact the AR professional is looking to achieve (see the AR SOSM model).

Analyst firms might also use this tool to monitor the ‘transactional tax’ that they impose on analyst relations professionals. If they raise the ‘interaction barrier’ too high (e.g. make it too difficult for analyst relations professionals to interact with them) while not providing sufficient coverage and showing impact, this could affect their vendor information source. They may be left with only a partial view of the market (raising exhaustivity and fairness issues). Finally, their vendor revenues might suffer too.

 

By Fabio Rocha (LinkedIn), Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn@lludovic), Neil Pollock (LinkedIn@neilpollock).

 

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Winners announced: IIAR Analyst of the Year 2016 https://analystrelations.org/2016/12/06/winners-announced-iiar-analyst-of-the-year-2016/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/12/06/winners-announced-iiar-analyst-of-the-year-2016/#comments Tue, 06 Dec 2016 19:30:25 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=141292 The IIAR is delighted to announce the winners of this year’s

IIAR Analyst of the Year 2016 and IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2016

AOTY

AND THE WINNERS ARE…

Keep reading below for the IIAR Analyst of Year 2016, IIAR Global Analyst Firm of Year 2016, IIAR Independent Analyst of the Year 2016 and the best new entrants

Analyst relations pros voted for over 170 different individual analysts. Having run the survey over several years, it was striking to see the amount of new analysts that figured this year as compared to previous ones. This goes to show the dynamic nature of this space. There are now hundreds of so-called ‘upstarts’ firms, analysts continue to move between firms, and new analysts enter into the picture.

The analysts were rated along a wide range of criteria that included: i) their knowledge of the domain, whether their research gives actionable advice, is their writing novel and thought provoking etc; through to ii) questions about their impact on technology adoption decisions; and iii) whether the particular analyst was easy and flexible to work with from an analyst relations point of view.

Unlike last year, where the vote was a close run thing, this time around there is a clear winner. One analyst stood “head and shoulders” above his peers with respect to how he was viewed by analyst relations pros.

The IIAR analyst of the year 2016 is Phil Fersht from HfS Research (LinkedIn@pfersht). Phil was runner up in the award last year, behind Julie Short of Gartner. This is a hat-trick for Phil as was he was also a previous winner of the award in 2010 and 2011. Congratulations once again to Phil. He is obviously doing something right!

The winner of the analyst of the year was nominated for the following reasons:

“Thought leader…say no more”.

“He is head and shoulders above all industry analysts as an influencer in the market and gives great unvarnished advise to our senior leadership”‘.

“Phil is very approachable and his advice brings in a different dimension to our thinking towards our strategy and business”

Phil Fersht

The runners up this year were Julie Short (LinkedIn@JulieDShort) from Gartner and Doug Cahill (LinkedIn, @dougcahill) from Enterprise Strategy Group. Whilst Julie was winner of the award last year, this is the first time that Doug has featured on our winners dais. Congratulations on their second and third places. Here are some reason why they received so many votes:

Julie is “driven, smart and easy to work with”.

Doug has “strong ability to distill and interpret complex concepts into key takeaways and actionable guidance – whether that is to end users or vendor clients”.

Following close, and unlucky not to be included in the final shortlist of three, were a large group of highly rated analysts. This included Chris Pang, Gard Little, Liz Herbert, Barbra McGann, Andrew Butler, Andy Mulholland, Mark Grannan and Ray Wang.

 

Global and Independent Analyst firms of the year were run using the same format based on 15 criteria, but in separate categories to allow for more equitable comparisons between the larger and smaller firms. The industry analyst market is segmented in terms of role and by size.

IIAR Global Analyst Firm of The Year

The IIAR Global Analyst Firm of the Year 2016 is Gartner.

The runner ups are Forrester and IDC.

This year again, Gartner was the clear category leader, followed by Forrester, IDC and Ovum. Forrester managed to reverse its position from last year where IDC came out in front. Special mention should be made of Ovum who continue to close the gap on the firms in front of it.

Here are just some of the comments we received about Gartner:

“I like how quickly and aggressively Gartner has grown out their marketing practice over the past 3 years”. 

“Gartner is premium priced, but delivers business value. Gartner has the broadest and deepest coverage of end-to-end data management. At least with the analysts I deal with on an ongoing basis, the analysts are client service focused and check their egos at the door”. 

“Gartner is the leading analyst firm by far, and their new recruited analysts are eager to learn. Great account team!!!”.

Here is a selection of comments about our runners up:

Forrester:

“Their account management exceeds the competition, and they make a true effort for us as a client to feel we are getting a full value from our investment”.

“Great group of analysts, Sales teams, and management. Fair pricing considering the competition above them…”.

IDC:

“Regional and WW a great firm to get data on markets and products, very useful to build GTM plans and activities. Nice people!!”.

“What I enjoy about IDC is that their analysts are very approachable (they are not as formal as say Gartner), they are covering more and more of what we do, they publish a lot of Marketscapes which is difficult in terms of time commitment and resources but when the end result is positive its a good outcome/visibility for the firm, the analysts are good at writing ad hoc pieces (IDC Links) and working with them for PR or marketing purposes is easy”. 

“This is the ONLY global analyst/research firm that focuses on manufacturing and related technology on a truly global basis”.

 

IIAR Independent Analyst Firm of The Year

The Independent Analyst Firm of the Year 2016 is HfS

The runner ups for this year are and ESG and Constellation Research.

In the Independent Analyst Firm of the Year category, HFS emerged as the clear winner, with ESG and Constellation fighting it out for second and third respectively. 451 Research and RedMonk also scored well.

Respondents described how HfS were:

“Thought leaders, flexible and very fast to see the latest trends”.

“Great firm, and growing global influence. Still needs to catch the Big 2”.

“HfS analysts are very easy to approach. Their content is easy to understand and use. They are very flexible in their deliverable usage”.

 

IIAR New Firm of The Year

Best New Entrant

In this category, our respondents were asked to identify a number of promising and potentially disruptive new firms. A wide range of new firms were mentioned. This shows that there is not one ‘market’ for industry analyst research but diverse markets with theses smaller firms able to cater for specialized products, technical fields and industrial settings. Here we list some of the firms in order of the votes they received: Moor Insights and Strategy, Aite GroupMachina Research, Current Analysis, IHS, ABI Research, Aptitude Research Partners, Celent and Creative Strategies.

 

About this survey

The data was collected and analysed by Fabio Rocha (LinkedIn) and Neil Pollock (LinkedIn, @neilpollock). Fabio is a seasoned executive with more than 20 years of enterprise sales, marketing and business development experience in IT software and services. He is currently completing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh Business School. Neil is a member of the IIAR board. In his day job he is Professor of Innovation at the University of Edinburgh Business School. He has recently published How Industry Analyst Shape the Digital Future. A more detailed analysis of the findings will be posted in due course, including of course a new version of the IIAR Tragic Quadrant. Finally, Ludovic Leforestier (@lludovicLinkedIn) oversaw the development of the survey and has been behind its continued improvement over several years following the original version by Jonny Bentwood  (LinkedIn@jonnybentwood).

 

Past winners

The IIAR Analyst of The Year has been running since 2008, see below the past winners.

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Constellation and the curse of the (not so) magic quadrant https://analystrelations.org/2016/10/14/constellation-and-the-curse-of-the-quadrant/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/10/14/constellation-and-the-curse-of-the-quadrant/#respond Fri, 14 Oct 2016 00:17:03 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=133298 At the beginning, the intent was pure.Gartner Real Quadrant
Industry analysts, more specifically the buy-side “prescribers” exist to help technology buyers (often referred to as end-users) select the best vendors and providers. They gather insights through public and private sources such as (semi-)private vendor briefings and conversations (inquiries) with their end-user subscribers. Some analysts take hundreds of briefings and inquiries in a year, allowing them to gather unique insights on the market segments they cover. This accumulated knowledge allow them to monetise this information asymmetry as reports, consulting sessions, speaking engagements, etc.

One of the first report format aiming specifically at helping technology buyers to select vendors/providers was of course the Gartner Magic Quadrant. Based on a two-by-two matrix (as popularised by BCG, which is ironic considering Gartner is ran by a McKinsey alumni), the “MQ” quickly became irreplaceable. The X axis is for how good a product/service is (completeness of vision), the Y axis is for market traction (ability to execute) and the quadrant is in fact four quadrants, from leader to niche with visionary and challenger in between. Gartner now publishes a staggering 149 MQ’s, enough to employ a small army of analyst relations (AR) managers at each megavendor. Those type of landmark vendor ratings not only impact sales by pre-selecting vendors in long or short lists but also shape markets altogether as my fellow IIAR board member Neil Pollock studied. No wonder it’s been abundantly blogged about. See our own IIAR Best Practice Paper on Managing the Magic Quadrant.

 

As with most industries, digital disrupts industry analysis firms, for instance crowdsourcing may challenge the information asymmetry position they enjoy. We’re now in an attention economy and firms are competing for attention with free content. The sentiment that everything can be found on Google seems universally accepted by Generation Y, which doesn’t bode well for detailed research. Quadrants cut through that clutter with their neat, apparently scientific, visuals. Everyone likes a list and wants in, buyers can zero in on prospective suppliers, analyst firms can sell reprints (I mean webrights), so what’s not to like?

And thus each and every firm now needs to have a vendor evaluation landmark report that is based on the seminal quadrant: Forrester surfs on Waves, IDC churns out MarketScapes, HfS paints Blueprints, G2 crowdsources TrustGrids, Ovum publishes the Decision Matrices, Chartis issues the RiskTech Quadrants, etc. Even the IIAR proudly boast the Tragic Quadrant. Apart from PAC who went full circle with their RADAR and MetaGroup who tried ellipses, they all look like Jeff Mann’s spoof above, though some introduced a third dimension with bubble sizes.  Ping me a comment for the ones I forget and I’ll build a list.

 

We’re in quadrant paradise -and it keeps everyone busy.

Over time, under vendor pressure and to respond to client queries, methodologies have incrementally become more robust and now routinely include detailed spreadsheet-based surveys, mandatory client references checks, independent surveys, vendor briefings, etc. In my own estimates, one MQ will cost ICT vendors and service providers between 100 and 150 man-hours -more if they got consultants on the bench to keep busy. On the analyst side, they’re likely to disappear in a dark room for one to three months, before escalations. This makes quadrant expensive and too slow to produce -sometimes missing refresh cycles on some markets. One fix is to automate and get users to do the legwork. G2 pioneered the crowdsourcing model and Gartner is gradually introducing more Peer Insights into their MQ’s. Another drawback of industrialised quadrants is that the analyst opinions and insights are either concealed behind a methodology black-box or diluted.

Too slow, too expensive, too numerous, not insightful? Maybe and yet, it seems quadrants are not going away.

Constellation saw that and think they’ve got a fix. They’ve just introduced ShortLists which are just that: short lists.  Here’s an example of the graphic below.
Constellation Short List group messaging 10/16
As you see, it’s a deboned quadrant: there’s no axis, not even a ranking as vendors are in alphabetical order. Call me a cynic if you like but I find that refreshing in its simplicity and also in the approach: all of it is free. You can download ShortLists for free, cite them in press release for no fee, use the graphic for zero Dollars (and even less Brexit Pounds), schedule an inquiry for nothing and even brief the analyst gratis. Look away awards sweatshops. Their methodology isn’t detailed but I’ll take the contrarian viewpoint that methodologies might have gone a little too much in the way of opinions at large firms.
Of course, Constellation hopes to increase their market traction, convert some prospects into paid subscribers but as for me I like that freemium model.

Yet, landmark vendor evaluations are such a pull for research firms that they’re unlikely to drop those signature reports any time soon. They’re usually the most downloaded research formats with case studies and vendor fuel the hype with a flurry of press releases each time a favourable evaluation comes out (but who would miss out?) They also buy webrights (reprints in industry parlance), a nice little earner for many firms -and a business model in itself for some.

Quadrants are imperfect but it seems there for the long haul. Personally, I would love to see them not only augmented with social ratings but also with informed opinions.

Is that too much to ask? What do you think?

Read also

 

All previous posts on the Gartner Magic Quadrant (and more)

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Who’s really shaping the digital future? https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/26/whos-really-shaping-the-digital-future/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/26/whos-really-shaping-the-digital-future/#respond Fri, 26 Feb 2016 09:49:59 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=101533 Professor Neil Pollock looks at the role industry analysts play in creating today’s markets and asks: Who is shaping this dynamic digital world?…

Neil Pollock IIAR

The words digital economy conjure images of young, tech-savvy entrepreneurs breaking moulds in a world where technology is disruptive. But could the reality be much more mundane and mercantile?

When Facebook released Facebook at work early last year, the social networking Goliath laid a huge challenge at the feet of LinkedIn, a powerful incumbent that had until then dominated its corner of the market.

The market segment in question, Social Software in the Workplace, was recently identified as distinct from the wider social media marketplace by Gartner Inc.

At first glance this seems to emphasize the sheer unstoppable energy of markets for the future digital economy — with the proliferation of not only products but entire product categories. For example, Gartner has identified several new sub-markets developing around Social Media technologies in the last couple of years. But could this explosion of new segments have a different source? Dig a little deeper and Gartner’s role appears highly significant.

For more than 30 years, Gartner has been telling the business world what’s the next thing in technology. Its analysis works by listing recognised players operating in a new field and depicting them in its (in)famous graphical ranking – the Magic Quadrant.

The Gartner Magic Quadrant is central to the firm’s success and a large part of how it’s managed to retain its 30% share of the $4 bn annual market for industry analysis. But while it may be described as amongst the most important and influential pieces of business research produced today, it has (at least) one serious flaw.Magic Quadrant

Having used the system for more than three decades, Gartner knows just the right number of vendors to depict to construct a graphic decision-makers find useful — somewhere between 10 and 25. This ‘beautiful picture’ — as the firm’s analysts have taken to calling it — gives CIOs just enough information to gain an ‘at a glance’ understanding of what’s going on in the market without rendering further advice from Gartner redundant.

The trouble is, what happens when there are hundreds rather than tens of players in a given segment? How does Gartner create its MQ picture then? As one of the firm’s analysts recently explained “…graphically you can, […] we’ve done it, you have 100 dots on the chart but its unreadable. It is just garbage.”

So when they were faced with a Gartner Magic Quadrant for Social Software which looked ‘too cluttered’ to be a meaningful analytic tool for CIOs, the analysts decided they’d break it into smaller pieces.

Thus three new market segments – Social Software in the Workplace, Externally Facing Social Software, and Social CRM – were born. And with them came three more aesthetically pleasing, marketable Magic Quadrants.

Let’s be clear in what we’re saying here. Some of the most important and high profile market segments of the digital economy were created not as a result of processes of technological innovation or product differentiation but to compensate for the limitations of Gartner’s signature research product.

Let us call the new segments that Gartner create “prosthetic markets” to distinguish from those market areas where there are real, organic relationships between vendors and adopter communities. We don’t know exactly how many of its 320 or so Magic Quadrants are prosthetic as opposed to real, but the fieldwork we’ve conducted during the past ten years suggests it’s likely to be quite a few.

Power of the Magic Quadrant

Power of the Magic Quadrant

Nor are Gartner alone in the practice. Its main rival Forrester also configures new markets around the constraints of its Forrester Wave — where it depicts around seven to 10 vendors. And given there are now as many as 700 analyst firms producing influential research on the digital economy, it may be these prosthetic markets are more prevalent than we think.

These interventions aren’t trivial. There is lots of evidence to suggest that they ultimately shape the process of innovation and product development that constitutes the digital economy.

Thankfully many of the savvy tech firms seem to recognise this. But with Facebook at Work, Facebook could easily end up losing out if it isn’t careful.

Not only is its entry late, it seems surprisingly unaware that its new battleground has in many respects been made up, meaning the dynamics of this segment could be very different those found in a more organic marketplace.

It is clear industry analysts are making their mark on the digital future in ways most commentators have yet to fully realise. What is most remarkable is not only how quickly these firms have been able to establish influence over markets and tech vendors, but on what this power appears to rest.

The digital economy is being shaped not simply by the supply and demand of traditional market economics. But it’s also being driven by — as one former analyst recently suggested to me — what needs to be done to keep industry analysts “in the game.”

 

Neil Pollock (Linkedin, @neilpollock, bio) is Professor of Innovation at the University of Edinburgh Business School and a member of the IIAR board.book cover

His book, How Industry Analysts Shape the Digital Future, co-authored with Professor Robin Williams (Linkedin), is available now.

Thanks to IIAR members Ludovic Leforestier (@lludovicLinkedIn) and Duncan Chapple (Linkedin, @DuncanChapple) for helpful comments on this blog post.

 

 

All previous posts on the Gartner Magic Quadrant (and more)

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Around Dan Bieler from Forrester in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/16/around-dan-bieler-from-forrester-in-10-questions-2/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/16/around-dan-bieler-from-forrester-in-10-questions-2/#respond Tue, 16 Feb 2016 12:36:16 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=101535 16zu9 Dan Bieler, Forrester ResearchToday we ask our probing questions of Dan Bieler from Forrester. Dan (Linkedin@DSBieler) was runner up in this years IIAR Analyst of the Year for 2015 as voted by analyst relations professionals

 

1. What are your coverage areas?

Key focus areas include customer engagement strategies, the mobile mind shift, and digital transformation.

2. What’s your typical day like?

When not travelling: jogging, report writing, customer calls; but a lot of travelling.

3. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

AR team performing as PR machine of vendor without any willingness for a two-way interaction.

4. How do you position your firm?

Selling syndicated research and consulting/advisory; end-users account for a large part of the business in addition to vendors.

5. What is your research methodology?  

 Primary, followed up by phone-based interviews, at times F2F discussions.

6. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? 

Yvonne Kaupp. Professional, good listener and communicator, very good at preparing briefings, workshops etc.

7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended?

Listening to contrarian opinions and investigating how/why these opinions were shaped/arrived at.

8. What are your offerings and key deliverables? 

Reports, blogs, tweets, presentations, workshops, consulting projects.

 

Recent ‘IIAR Around in 10 questions’ posts

 

More posts mentioning Dan

 

Other IIAR> Around in 10 Questions

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Winners announced: IIAR Analyst of the Year 2015 https://analystrelations.org/2015/12/01/whos-the-iiar-analyst-of-the-year-2015/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/12/01/whos-the-iiar-analyst-of-the-year-2015/#comments Tue, 01 Dec 2015 19:00:27 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=100834 The IIAR is delighted to announce the winners of this year’s

IIAR Analyst of the Year 2015 and IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2015

IIAR Analyst of the Year

AND THE WINNERS ARE…

Keep reading below for the IIAR Analyst of Year 2015, IIAR Global Analyst Firm of Year 2015, IIAR Independent Analyst of the Year 2015 and the best new entrants.

The IIAR analyst of the year 2015 was a close run thing this year round. Unlike previous years there was a lot more variety in the numbers and kinds of analysts chosen. Analyst relations professionals voted for over 150 different individual analysts, rating them along a wide range of criteria that included: their knowledge of the domain, does their research give actionable advice, is it novel and thought provoking etc; through to questions about their impact on technology adoption; and whether they were easy and flexible to work with from an analyst relations point of view.

Congratulations to the IIAR Analyst of the Year is  Julie Short at Gartner (LinkedIn, @JulieDShort). This is the first year in which Julie has won the award and we would like to extend our congratulations to her on behalf of the IIAR. Reasons AR pros gave for Julie’s nomination include:

“Got to grips really quickly with the consulting market, one that’s very fragmented and hard to analyse”.

“Julie is forging new ground for traditional tech analysts in the business consulting space – she is pushing understanding and definitions!”

“Julie has taken on and evolved a coverage area – Business Consulting – that is still nascent at Gartner and has created rigour and a clear definition for the topic with her colleagues internally in particular.”

The runner ups this year were Ray Wang / Constellation Research (LinkedIn, @rwang0) and Phil Fersht at HfS Research (LinkedIn@pfersht).

Both Ray Wang and Phil Fersht are past winners of this award (see links below). Congratulations on their 2nd and 3rd places. Here are some reason why they received votes:

“Constellation has shaken up the AR market the 4 years they’ve been on the scene. There approach to research and influencing the market is novel and refreshing and they are the most approachable firm with the most approachable analysts in the business”.

Talking about Phil Fersht: “Thought provoking, very honest and knowledgeable. One of the very best writers around. And his engagement in discussions in social media/blog is unparalleled”.

“I do not understand how Phil is so prolific and insightful simultaneously. But he is”.

Following close, and unlucky not to be included in the final shortlist of 3 were a large group of highly rated analysts. This included: Dan Bieler / Forrester, Errol Rasit / Gartner), Gianluca Tramacere / Gartner, Kevin McPartland / Greenwich Associates, Marc Cecere / Forrester, Neil MacDonald /Gartner and Zeus Kerravala / ZK Research.

 

Global and Independent Analyst firms of the year were run using the same format based on 15 criteria, but in separate categories to allow for more equitable comparisons between the smaller firms.

IIAR Global Analyst Firm of The Year

 

The IIAR Global Analyst Firm of the Year 2015 is Gartner.

The runner ups are IDC and Forrester.

This year again, Gartner was the clear category leader, followed by IDC and Forrester. Interestingly, other firms like Constellation, 451 Research and HfS are beginning to make a showing in this category. Here are just some of the comments we received about Gartner:

“The only analyst firm that really makes a difference”.

“Premium priced, but worth it for the breadth, depth, and quality of research and advice. The most influential firm with the greatest impact on enterprise sales deals – no other firm even close”.

Here is a selection of comments about our runners up:

Talking about IDC “Trusted advisor for our company and is considered one of the TOP TIER firms”. “They are the most global”. “Very easy to work with these folks – they are great!”.

“Forrester’s recent financial woes belie the quality of its research and thought leadership in several topics – especially customer experience, mobile, privacy, security, and digital transformation”.

 

IIAR Independent Analyst Firm of the year

The Independent Analyst Firm of the Year 2015 is Constellation Research.

The runner ups for this year are HfS and ESG.

In the Independent Analyst Firm of the Year category, Constellation emerged as the clear winner, with Hfs and ESG fighting it out for second and third respectively. CCS Insight, Digital Clarity Group, Forrester and PAC all scored well also. One respondent described how:

“Constellation has shaken up the AR market the 4 years they’ve been on the scene. There approach to research and influencing the market is novel and refreshing and they are the most approachable firm with the most approachable analysts in the business”.

As for our runners up:

“While they have been around for some time, HFS has a whole new team that is highly business focused, looking to generate new technology research, offers freemium access”.

 IIAR New Firm of The Year

Best New Entrant

In this category, our respondents were asked to identify a number of promising and potentially disruptive new firms. Here we list them (in no particular order): TECHnalysis Research, Securosis, KeyInterval Research, Aptitude Research Partners, SCM World, Machina Research, G2 Crowd, Aragon Research, Blue Hill Research, Subscription Insider, Gigaom Research.

 

About this survey

The data was collected and analysed by Neil Pollock. Neil is co-lead (with Aniruddho Mukherjee) of the UK Chapter of the IIAR. In his day job he is Professor of Innovation at the University of Edinburgh Business School. He has been researching industry analysts for several years. If you require further information about the survey he can be contacted on npollock@analystrelations.org. A more detailed analysis of the findings will be posted in due course, including of course a new version of the IIAR Tragic Quadrant.

 

Past winners

The IIAR Analyst of The Year has been running since 2008, see below the past winners.

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Will research crowdsourcing finally move analyst firms to an experience business model? https://analystrelations.org/2015/07/15/can-it-research-be-crowdsourced/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/07/15/can-it-research-be-crowdsourced/#comments Wed, 15 Jul 2015 22:16:35 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=97770
G2 Crowd Grid for Help desk - IIAR website

G2 Crowd Grid for Help desk

Good piece by Tony Bradley on TechSpective.net (via Rob Enderle and Stephen England) on whether crowdsourced analysis could displace Gartner, Forrester, IDC, etc.

I’ve been watching analysts for a long time and think this is fascinating -I was waiting for such a “JD Power of Tech” for a long time. The piece talks about Chaordix and Whale Path, and I’ve known for a while about G2 Crowd. Another well known so called Peer Review Site (PRS) is TrustRadius.

If they get it right, it will finally change the analyst business. Analysts are not going to disappear anytime -they may just be called something else: you’ll still need curators, pundits, showmen and showwomen, futurists and other shamans. But if the data collection could be automated instead of those more or less bad quadrants, they could focus on experience. It remain to be seen whether firms can be weaned off subscriptions? We, vendors, all know that moment when your rep suddenly wakes up and invites you to lunch… They’re all hooked onto subs: it’s relatively easy to renew, they can sneak in a 7-15% uplift tax (I did not say racket, did I?) every year, they produce the research once and sell it many times (Gene Hall calls this leverage and it certainly worked so far for Gartner).

This reminds me of a debate between the transition from on premise and SaaS: in the industry analysis industry, moving to an experience model would be a similar business model shift.

The other reason why analyst firms find moving towards being an experience business (despite some talking ad nauseam about the age of the customer) is psychology. Analyst firms are geared up to create technology myths and own the truth. To them, crowdsourcing is abdicating. The larger the firm, the harder it is: some smaller firms are very inclusive in bringing folks together (I was really impressed by a recent Constellation event for instance) while on the other hand I always thought that networking at Gartner Symposium was hard work. Both Gartner and Forrester market services aimed at specific communities, for instance respectively EXP and the Councils but it remains analyst-centric (although I haven’t paid the required 200k to try the EXP CIO service, so my guess is as good as anyone’s here).

One final thought. What everyone forgets (except maybe Le CXP) is the role of the smaller (and not so small) consultants and system integrators. Large firms have the scale to have research desk and even publish research and thought leadership (that’s actually my day job) but smaller ones don’t have that luxury. What they have however is hands-on experience of implementing solutions, deep relationships with their end-user clients and often an extremely good knowledge of a functional or technical niche.

In other words, consultants have insights that is complementary to analysts and are not competing with them. With a mechanism such as G2crowd, analysts could leverage them. Consultants on the other hand could get access to detailed benchmarks which the analysts currently struggle to produce. That would be Uber for research and I think the concept sounds cool.

What do you all think?

 

Read also:

 

Update

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The IIAR “Tragic Quadrant” https://analystrelations.org/2015/06/08/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/06/08/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant/#comments Mon, 08 Jun 2015 15:16:20 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=97150 Last year, as part of the 2014 IIAR Analyst of The Year Survey, we invited analyst relations professionals to rate their favourite industry analyst individuals and the firms they worked for. More than 60 individual organisations responded to our survey. We were interested to see if we could do further analysis on the data that was collected.

When we set out to do the IIAR Analyst of the Year (with Helen Chantry), we always had envisioned doing a Magic Quadrant of analyst firms. This year the survey provided us with further information which we have been able to breakdown and analyse to provide a more detailed understanding of how analyst relations professionals perceive the relevance, impact and reachability of industry analyst firms. We are not claiming that this is an exhaustive study. Rather it simply opens a new (slightly cheeky – hence the notion of “Tragic Quadrant”) window onto the analyst landscape, where we attempt to rank industry analyst firms by impact, relevance and ease to do business with.

The IIAR survey asked respondents to assess individual industry analysts on a range of issues broadly grouped according to the following criteria:

  • ‘Impact’ (to what extent does the industry analyst impact the technology purchase decision);
  • ‘Relevance’ (is the particular industry analyst relevant to the technology purchase decision, do they understand the marketplace);
  • ‘Interaction’ (how easy is the industry analyst to reach and to interact with).

We are able to represent the top 13 industry analyst firms according to this new analysis. We have produced three Tragic Quadrants according to i) overall industry analyst firms, ii) global industry analyst firms, and finally iii) independent industry analyst firms.

  • The Y axis depicts the ‘Impact’ of the industry analyst firm on the purchase decision. This also relates to their perceived credibility and capability to provide an objective opinion.
  • The X axis marks their ‘Relevance’ for the purchase decision. This means their capability to cover the market and their specific geographical allocation. It also includes public recognition of their presence in the market (e.g. as an expert).
  • The size of the bubble is ‘Interaction’. This relates to issues of communication (e.g. how easy is it to get to them and to talk to them).

Overall Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 (Overall) featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 (overall) featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

In terms of the Overall Industry Analyst Firm Quadrant, Gartner, Forrester and IDC came out ahead of rivals. In terms of their specific ranking according to our analysis, Gartner is 1st, Forrester 2nd, and IDC 3rd. Gartner is higher on impact and relevance than its immediate rivals, but did less well in terms of interaction. IDC by contrast scores someway ahead of Gartner in terms of interaction but is perceived to be slightly less impactful and relevant. By contrast, although some way behind the leaders in terms of impact and relevance, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana and SMB Group did particularly well on interaction.

Global Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant - Global Firms featuring Gartner, Forrester, IDC, HfS Research, Ovum, 451 Research

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant – Global Firms featuring Gartner, Forrester, IDC, HfS Research, Ovum, 451 Research

In terms of the Global Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant, Gartner stood out as 1st. This was followed by, in 2nd place, Forrester, and IDC in 3rd place. As mentioned above, Gartner were successful with high levels of relevance but performed less well on interaction. IDC performed particularly well on impact and interaction. In terms of the other firms, HfS performed well across all three categories but scored particularly well on impact. 451 Research and Ovum did well based on interaction.

Independent Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant - Independent analyst firms featuring Constellation, HfS Research, Ventana, SMB Group

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant – Independent analyst firms featuring Constellation, HfS Research, Ventana, SMB Group

In terms of the Independent Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant, Constellation were in 1st place, HfS in 2nd place, followed by SMB Group in 3rd place and Ventana in 4th. Constellation scored particularly well on impact, whilst HfS performed well on impact and interaction but less well on relevance. SMB Group scored highly in terms of interaction. Ventana did well in terms of impact but slightly lower in terms of interaction.

In case you were wondering the Tragic Quadrant is by no mean meant to be a normative or scientific depiction of the industry analysis industry. It offers but one window onto this world that was partially inspired by Juvenal’s ancient dictum Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? (which, roughly translated, is who assesses the assessors? or, in our case, who analyses the analysts?). Whilst it was initially intended as a bit of fun we do nevertheless think there are some interesting aspects for AR professionals and analyst houses to take from it. We see at least two takeaways emerging for different audiences:

  • AR professionals may use this as a subjective analysis tool to look at their target audience engagement strategies. They should balance ‘ease to do business with’ against ‘relevance’ and ‘impact’. Or, in other words, they shouldn’t brief analysts just because they’re easy to deal with (or conversely they should look at analysts which are less of a pain depending on the type of impact the AR professional is looking for (see the AR SOSM model);
  • analyst firms should monitor the ‘transactional tax’ they impose on AR people: if they raise the ‘interaction barrier’ too high while not providing sufficient coverage and not showing impact, their vendor information source might soon provide them only a partial view of the market (raising exhaustivity and fairness issues) or their vendor revenues might suffer too.

 

By Neil Pollock (LinkedIn@neilpollock), Yulia Sidorova (LinkedIn) and Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn@lludovic)

 

Related posts:

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IIAR’s first date with Forrester CMO https://analystrelations.org/2015/05/08/iiars-first-date-with-forrester-cmo/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/05/08/iiars-first-date-with-forrester-cmo/#respond Fri, 08 May 2015 14:11:08 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=96495 Victor-Milligan Smallforrester-logo-150x150IIAR hosted Forrester’s new CMO, Victor Milligan (@vtmilliganLinkedIn), at SapientNitro’s office in central London on April 30th. Victor joined Forrester in December to lead its global marketing organisation. He was in London last week for Forrester’s Marketing Leaders Forum, and later joined the IIAR members to discuss the company’s “Age of the Customer” strategy, go-to-market and key research themes for 2015. Benjamin Ensor (LinkedIn@benjamin_ensor), VP & Research Director serving eBusiness & Channel Strategy Professionals also joined Victor during the session and took part in the Q&A.

In his 45 min presentation, Victor shared insights on Forrester’s Age of the Customer (AoC) vision, its four market imperatives, and what it means to AR. The AoC imperatives include Mobile, Customer Experience, Big Data and Digital Business Transformation. Given the relevance to today’s business, all of Forrester’s research will be centered on these imperatives in 2015.

Victor also talked about Forrester’s unique positioning in the market, serving both business and technology leaders to help them develop customer-obsessed strategies that drive growth. Within the scope of its four market imperatives, Forrester’s research focus includes vertical relevance, predictions, a new B2B Marketing role, more Waves (Forrester’s vendor rankings), TechRadars, and Playbooks, which have proven popular with end-users. All will continue to fuel a superior customer experience for its clients.

Specifically in terms of Europe expansion, Victor indicated that Forrester is experiencing growth and is making significant investments in the areas of CX, Digital Business, Business Technology transformation, Leadership Boards, as well as Data for the UK, France and Germany.

As the new CMO in a highly competitive research market, Victor surfaced his 2015 marketing priorities across Research, Consulting, Data, Events and Peer collaboration.

Bottom line: On being asked for “one piece of advice to AR pros” on working with Forrester, Victor’s prompt response was to “collaborate” with Forrester and to stay ahead of the game by adopting a “customer obsessed” strategy at the heart of our business to ensure success.

 

 

 

 

Previous posts on Forrester:

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Forrester Research Chief Marketing Officer to Speak at IIAR UK Forum – 30 April 15 https://analystrelations.org/2015/03/18/forrester-research-chief-marketing-officer-to-speak-at-iiar-uk-forum-30-april-15/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/03/18/forrester-research-chief-marketing-officer-to-speak-at-iiar-uk-forum-30-april-15/#respond Wed, 18 Mar 2015 15:01:23 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=80140 IIAR UK Forum and Webinar with Victor Milligan, CMO at Forrester Research

Victor-Milligan SmallForrester’s new Chief Marketing Officer, Victor Milligan, will be coming to IIAR UK’s member event on Thursday, April 30, 6-8 PM UK time, to discuss the company’s “Age of the Customer” strategy and the future direction of its Marketing organization.
You will leave this meeting with an improved understanding of what Forrester has in store for 2015, including updates on go-to-market model, key research themes, new products, and what it means for AR pros.

What: IIAR Forum and Webinar with Victor MilliganChief Marketing Officer at Forrester Research
Where:
 Central London location confirmed to all who register  to join the live event
When: 30th April 2015, webinar starts at 1800 UK Time, 1900 CET, 1300 ET, or 1000 PT
Who: Free for IIAR Members. All AR Professionals are welcome, IIAR Membership not required (See note below)
Register: For Webinar register <<HERE>>. If joining for the Forum in Central London, confirm by completing the form below.

This event, as ever, is free for all IIAR Members and (as a special “try-and-buy”) is free to attend for all AR Professionals. Complete the form below to register – now !

[contact-form]

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