Digital Clarity Group – Institute of Industry Analyst Relations (IIAR) https://analystrelations.org The IIAR is a not-for-profit organisation established to raise awareness of analyst relations and the value of industry analysts, promote best practice amongst analyst relations professionals, enhance communication between analyst firms and vendors, and offer opportunities for AR practitioners to network with their industry peers. Thu, 11 Oct 2018 16:43:54 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 76177372 The IIAR Tragic Quadrant for 2017 https://analystrelations.org/2017/02/24/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-for-2017/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/02/24/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant-for-2017/#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2017 11:49:40 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=155166 Two years ago, in 2015, we produced the first IIAR Tragic Quadrant. It was met with much enthusiasm and comment, thus we have decided to repeat the exercise once again this year. Below we present the Tragic Quadrant for 2017. The Tragic Quadrant is compiled from data collected as part of the 2016 IIAR Analyst of the Year Survey, where, annually, we invite analyst relations professionals to rate individual industry analyst and the firms they work for. This year more than 100 different individual organisations responded to our survey. We were interested to see if we could do further analysis on the data that was collected.

In producing the Tragic Quadrant what we sought to do was to rank analyst firms according to three criteria. We chose these criteria because this is what the IIAR survey asks respondents to assess:

  • Impact: The Y axis depicts the ‘Impact’ of the industry analyst firm on the purchase decision. This also relates to their perceived credibility and capability to provide an objective opinion.
  • Relevance: The X axis marks their ‘Relevance’ for the purchase decision. This means their capability to cover the market and their specific geographical allocation. It also includes public recognition of their presence in the market (e.g. as an expert).
  • Interaction: The size of the bubble is ‘Interaction’. This relates to issues of communication (e.g. how easy is it to get to them and to talk to them).

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2017 featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, 451, Ovum, ESG, Machina, Crisp, Constellation, HfS

IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2017

We are able to represent the top 10 industry analyst firms according to this new analysis. Gartner is “up and to the right”, which means that it leads in terms of impacting purchase decisions and relevance (e.g. their analysts know their stuff).

However, the small size of its bubble indicates that analyst relations professionals think Gartner is amongst the hardest of analyst firms to do business with out of all the analyst firms represented. Close behind is Forrester and IDC. The size of IDC’s bubble merits attention, as it was reported to be “one of the most flexible firms” to deal with, to use the words of one of our respondents. All three firms more or less maintain the same ordinal position in the top right quadrant as last time (see the Tragic Quadrant for 2015 below).

Other notable developments is HfS which has improved its ‘relevance from the previous Tragic Quadrant but it is perceived to be slightly less impactful by analyst professionals. Ovum and 451 Research maintain more or less the same position with regard to the ‘Big 3’, but 451 has overtaken Ovum in terms of relevance, whilst Ovum has made a dramatic improvement in terms of ease of interaction. Constellation remains more or less in the same position as last time. New entrants this year into the Tragic Quadrant include Machina and Crisp Research, with the former, by some degree, perceived as the most flexible of analyst firms to work with by analyst relations professionals.

IIAR Tragic Quadrant for 2015

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

For those who have not come across the Tragic Quadrant before, it gets its name from the infamous GartnerMagic Quadrant’ of course. We see it as a kind of ‘Magic Quadrant of Magic Quadrant’. We are not claiming that it is the results of an exhaustive study. Nor do we pretend that the Tragic Quadrant is a completely serious piece of research. (There is a clue in the title “Tragic”). Nonetheless, we do think the data collected – and note, that we now have Analyst of the Year surveys stretching back several years – throw some interesting light both (a) onto the changing nature of the industry analyst landscape and (b) how analyst relations professionals view the analyst ecology. It is demonstrating that in engaging with analyst firms IT vendors are balancing the requirements for these firms to have ‘impact’, ‘relevance’ and to be ‘easy to work with’.

Analyst relations professionals could therefore use a tool like this to look at their target audience engagement strategies. It would encourage them to balance ‘ease to do business with’ against ‘relevance’ and ‘impact’. To say the same thing in different words, they shouldn’t brief analysts just because they’re easy to deal with. Or, conversely, they should approach those analysts which are less of a pain depending on the type of impact the AR professional is looking to achieve (see the AR SOSM model).

Analyst firms might also use this tool to monitor the ‘transactional tax’ that they impose on analyst relations professionals. If they raise the ‘interaction barrier’ too high (e.g. make it too difficult for analyst relations professionals to interact with them) while not providing sufficient coverage and showing impact, this could affect their vendor information source. They may be left with only a partial view of the market (raising exhaustivity and fairness issues). Finally, their vendor revenues might suffer too.

 

By Fabio Rocha (LinkedIn), Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn@lludovic), Neil Pollock (LinkedIn@neilpollock).

 

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Around Scott Liewehr from Digital Clarity Group in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/11/around-scott-liewehr-from-digital-clarity-group-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/11/around-scott-liewehr-from-digital-clarity-group-in-10-questions/#comments Fri, 11 Mar 2016 12:54:54 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=102249 dcg-team-profiles-scott-liewehrToday we ask our probing questions of Scott Liewehr from Digital Clarity Group (@Just_Clarity, see related posts). Scott ( LinkedIn@sliewehr) is the founder and CEO of Digital Clarity Group, voted New Analyst Firm of the Year by IIAR in 2014.

 

1. What are your coverage areas?
Customer Experience Management, Digital Transformation, Service Providers (specifically digital agencies and SI’s), marketing and ecommerce technologies, vendor and service provider selection, content management technology.

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
There’s some quality research and thought leadership being done, but unfortunately it all addresses only a small portion of the overall problem. Organizations are trying to figure out how to transform themselves digitally and to meet the ever-changing expectations of their customers. Various categories of software go a small part of the way to solve this, but a much larger portion of the delta between where buy-side companies are and where they want to be lies in how they implement this software, and then what they do with it once it’s installed. Agencies and integrators are on the front lines doing most of this work, yet IT analysts typically turn a blind eye to this fact because there are so many of service providers and they’re much harder to evaluate. Organizations can find oodles of information and plot graphs about the best hammers on the market, yet no one even tries to point them to an appropriate carpenter. It’s too bad, really.

3. What’s your typical day like?
Most days have something to do with an airplane and/or a hotel, but along the way I find myself on phone/web meetings most of the day, taking vendor or service provider briefings, conducting advisories / inquiries with buy- or sell-side clients, or talking to prospects about how we can help them. I also spend a lot of time in PowerPoint, crafting one presentation or another. And, finally, I spend a lot of time on internal affairs as well, interviewing talent or working with the team in some way or the other to push our agenda and research forward. I tend to do most of my actual work after 11pm since my days are usually taken up on calls or in meetings.

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
I think my favorites are the few times I’ve received loud and expletive-laden calls after critiquing a vendor publicly, either on my monthly show (cms-connected.com), or in writing. Most know that I’m fair, and I’ll say two positive things for every criticism (and the AR person will ALWAYS know where I stand in advance), but a very small percentage of AR folks are hyper-sensitive and want to make an enemy out of anyone who doesn’t buy the BS their executives like to spin. I love being the calm one in the conversation, providing data and back-up to each point with which they take issue, and having them finally say, “yeah, fine, but you didn’t need to say it”. I actually think I’m pretty reserved in my public commentary, but sometimes you just strike a nerve.

[BTW, now that the show is recorded in advance, I always give the vendor a heads up that it’s coming — that wasn’t always possible when the show was streamed live. And blogs and papers will always be discussed or sent in advance.]

5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
Our mission is to help leaders leverage digital to optimize / transform the experience they deliver to customers, prospects and employees. To do this, we work directly with the buy-side to help them establish roadmaps and then to select the right technologies and services partners to get them there. We also offer executive councils and retainers, but most of our research and thought leadership follows the freemium model. On the sell-side, we work with both technology vendors and service providers in fairly typical ways — advisories, thought leadership, partner programs, speaking engagements, inquiries, workshops, etc. We also find ourselves working with private equity firms a fair amount, advising them through their due diligence, inorganic growth and exit strategies.

6. What is your research methodology?
We spend a lot of time on both primary and secondary research. Our new VOCalis program (C-Sat service about the service providers) has us talking to hundreds of buy-siders about their experiences with agencies and SI’s. We’re proud to have more data and insights on this space than anyone, bar none, and we’ll be putting it to great use in 2016 and beyond.

7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
There are so many I like, but to name a few, Beth Torrie (Sitecore), Paige Pace (Adobe), and Brielle Nikaido (Salesforce) are standouts. Also Cassandra Allen (Razorfish), Teri Green (PwC), and Manoj Kumar (HCL). Finally, John Taschek at Salesforce, Darren Guarnaccia at Sitecore, and Kevin Cochrane at Jahia aren’t AR professionals, but their approaches to working with analysts are probably the best out there.

8. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
I think Salesforce’s annual Analyst Summit is the best event I’ve attended. It’s 100% focused on the analysts, includes a good mix of roundtable interactions between execs and analysts (where Salesforce gets to ask *us* the questions — smart!), good 1:1 opportunities, and great food / location. It’s a smart event on their part, although having it the first week of the New Year makes me pity their AR team who must lose their holidays to planning. 🙁

9. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
There are a lot, actually. I think my own colleague, Tim Walters, writes better than anyone in the industry. I’ve always appreciated Stephen Powers and the work he’s done at Forrester, although he may not think so because I’ve disagreed loudly at times (but I’ve praised him even more). I’m jealous of Ray Wang’s drive and the way he seems to extend his days to 30 hours apiece. I also appreciate his counsel and friendship — he’s constantly disrupting the norm. And finally, I’d say I enjoy reading Esteban Kolsky because of his relentless willingness to speak the truth according to himself. He’s true to his thoughts and belief system — sometimes they’re raw, but it’s an honorable quality nonetheless and enjoyable to read from afar.

10. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share? I love to coach. I travel a lot, so I become super-dad on the weekend to my three kids. Right now I’m coaching four soccer teams, and once spring starts, I’ll be adding two baseball teams into the mix!

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The IIAR “Tragic Quadrant” https://analystrelations.org/2015/06/08/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/06/08/the-iiar-tragic-quadrant/#comments Mon, 08 Jun 2015 15:16:20 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=97150 Last year, as part of the 2014 IIAR Analyst of The Year Survey, we invited analyst relations professionals to rate their favourite industry analyst individuals and the firms they worked for. More than 60 individual organisations responded to our survey. We were interested to see if we could do further analysis on the data that was collected.

When we set out to do the IIAR Analyst of the Year (with Helen Chantry), we always had envisioned doing a Magic Quadrant of analyst firms. This year the survey provided us with further information which we have been able to breakdown and analyse to provide a more detailed understanding of how analyst relations professionals perceive the relevance, impact and reachability of industry analyst firms. We are not claiming that this is an exhaustive study. Rather it simply opens a new (slightly cheeky – hence the notion of “Tragic Quadrant”) window onto the analyst landscape, where we attempt to rank industry analyst firms by impact, relevance and ease to do business with.

The IIAR survey asked respondents to assess individual industry analysts on a range of issues broadly grouped according to the following criteria:

  • ‘Impact’ (to what extent does the industry analyst impact the technology purchase decision);
  • ‘Relevance’ (is the particular industry analyst relevant to the technology purchase decision, do they understand the marketplace);
  • ‘Interaction’ (how easy is the industry analyst to reach and to interact with).

We are able to represent the top 13 industry analyst firms according to this new analysis. We have produced three Tragic Quadrants according to i) overall industry analyst firms, ii) global industry analyst firms, and finally iii) independent industry analyst firms.

  • The Y axis depicts the ‘Impact’ of the industry analyst firm on the purchase decision. This also relates to their perceived credibility and capability to provide an objective opinion.
  • The X axis marks their ‘Relevance’ for the purchase decision. This means their capability to cover the market and their specific geographical allocation. It also includes public recognition of their presence in the market (e.g. as an expert).
  • The size of the bubble is ‘Interaction’. This relates to issues of communication (e.g. how easy is it to get to them and to talk to them).

Overall Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 (Overall) featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

The IIAR Tragic Quadrant 2015 (overall) featuring Gartner, IDC, Forrester, Ovum, HfS, Constellation, 451 Research, Celent, Pac, ESG, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana, SMB Group

In terms of the Overall Industry Analyst Firm Quadrant, Gartner, Forrester and IDC came out ahead of rivals. In terms of their specific ranking according to our analysis, Gartner is 1st, Forrester 2nd, and IDC 3rd. Gartner is higher on impact and relevance than its immediate rivals, but did less well in terms of interaction. IDC by contrast scores someway ahead of Gartner in terms of interaction but is perceived to be slightly less impactful and relevant. By contrast, although some way behind the leaders in terms of impact and relevance, Digital Clarity Group, Ventana and SMB Group did particularly well on interaction.

Global Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant - Global Firms featuring Gartner, Forrester, IDC, HfS Research, Ovum, 451 Research

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant – Global Firms featuring Gartner, Forrester, IDC, HfS Research, Ovum, 451 Research

In terms of the Global Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant, Gartner stood out as 1st. This was followed by, in 2nd place, Forrester, and IDC in 3rd place. As mentioned above, Gartner were successful with high levels of relevance but performed less well on interaction. IDC performed particularly well on impact and interaction. In terms of the other firms, HfS performed well across all three categories but scored particularly well on impact. 451 Research and Ovum did well based on interaction.

Independent Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant - Independent analyst firms featuring Constellation, HfS Research, Ventana, SMB Group

2015 IIAR Tragic Quadrant – Independent analyst firms featuring Constellation, HfS Research, Ventana, SMB Group

In terms of the Independent Industry Analyst Firms Quadrant, Constellation were in 1st place, HfS in 2nd place, followed by SMB Group in 3rd place and Ventana in 4th. Constellation scored particularly well on impact, whilst HfS performed well on impact and interaction but less well on relevance. SMB Group scored highly in terms of interaction. Ventana did well in terms of impact but slightly lower in terms of interaction.

In case you were wondering the Tragic Quadrant is by no mean meant to be a normative or scientific depiction of the industry analysis industry. It offers but one window onto this world that was partially inspired by Juvenal’s ancient dictum Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? (which, roughly translated, is who assesses the assessors? or, in our case, who analyses the analysts?). Whilst it was initially intended as a bit of fun we do nevertheless think there are some interesting aspects for AR professionals and analyst houses to take from it. We see at least two takeaways emerging for different audiences:

  • AR professionals may use this as a subjective analysis tool to look at their target audience engagement strategies. They should balance ‘ease to do business with’ against ‘relevance’ and ‘impact’. Or, in other words, they shouldn’t brief analysts just because they’re easy to deal with (or conversely they should look at analysts which are less of a pain depending on the type of impact the AR professional is looking for (see the AR SOSM model);
  • analyst firms should monitor the ‘transactional tax’ they impose on AR people: if they raise the ‘interaction barrier’ too high while not providing sufficient coverage and not showing impact, their vendor information source might soon provide them only a partial view of the market (raising exhaustivity and fairness issues) or their vendor revenues might suffer too.

 

By Neil Pollock (LinkedIn@neilpollock), Yulia Sidorova (LinkedIn) and Ludovic Leforestier (LinkedIn@lludovic)

 

Related posts:

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Digital Disruption Tsunami takes over Analyst firms https://analystrelations.org/2015/03/09/digital-disruption-tsunami-takes-over-analyst-firms/ https://analystrelations.org/2015/03/09/digital-disruption-tsunami-takes-over-analyst-firms/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2015 17:59:53 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=78511 Constellation loves DCGConstellation loves DCGConstellation loves DCGIn an age of Digital Disruption and Business Transformation, when organisations are continuously embracing reinvention to stay in the business, change is imperative.

 

Who would have thought that the once dominant brands such as Blockbuster would be killed by a 30 staff strong Netflix due to their failure of recognizing the change and seizing the opportunity. And this is only one of the many classical examples of the rise and death of brands.

 

Digital Disruption or the Digital Business Transformation is a widely and most talked about term by almost every analyst firm in the past few years addressing organisations’ challenges and advising them to adapt themselves to this. In this era, you either need to be the disruptor (either reinvent yourself or acquire a unique combination of skills through alliances & acquisitions) or be disrupted by a competitor who embraces the change earlier than you.

And the analyst firms themselves aren’t any exception. Constellation Research Group (@ConstellationRGannounced today  a strategic alliance with Digital Clarity Group (@just_clarity). Currently only focused on the buy-side market the partnership promises to address organizations’ challenges through the complexities of digital transformation.

 

While DCG (since it was founded in 2012) in the past few years has emerged with a strong focus on organizations navigating on digital disruption and focusing on (digital) agencies, Constellation Research (a Silicon Valley based business research and advisory firm) has helped clients transform business models with disruptive technologies focusing on large offshore system integrators so it will only be interesting to see how the alliance pans out addressing some of the client challenges.

 

While the specifics of the scope of this partnership outside the buy- side are unclear for now, one should keep a close eye into what it will have to offer both in terms of their research and influence on the buyer community. Also, given that the major analyst firms have a strong focus in the already complex Digital Business Transformation space, this alliance is something to watch out for in the near future.

 

Bottom line:

 

Recent posts on Constellation

Recent posts on DCG

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The IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year 2014 https://analystrelations.org/2014/12/18/the-iiar-analyst-firms-of-the-year-2014-are-gartner_inc-forrester-idc-constellationrg-hfsresearch-ventanaresearch-smbgroup-just_clarity-aoty-archat/ https://analystrelations.org/2014/12/18/the-iiar-analyst-firms-of-the-year-2014-are-gartner_inc-forrester-idc-constellationrg-hfsresearch-ventanaresearch-smbgroup-just_clarity-aoty-archat/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 16:16:38 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=74837 The IIAR is delighted to announce the winners of the 2014

IIAR Analyst Firm of the Year

AND THE WINNERS ARE…

Often imitated, never equalled -the IIAR Analyst of The Year is back in 2014!

The only independent influencers relations professional association surveyed its members and other carefully vetted AR professionals to vote in several main categories: best global firm, best independent firm and best newcomer. More criteria were included -see below. This panel composition and methodology ensures both independence and an opinion coming from the most knowledgeable -and critical- on industry analysis firms, research and analysts themselves.

Individual analysts have also been voted -the results will be published this Friday.

And now, without further ado…

IIAR Global Analyst Firm of The Year

The IIAR Global Analyst Firm of The Year 2014 is Gartner.

The runner ups are Forrester and IDC.

One of our respondents had the following comment: “Gartner is the 800 pound gorilla in the analyst market because it has the greatest influence with technology buyers, has the most vauable brand, and is a well run $2bn business. These factors are also why it generates such vehement hatred among some boutique analyst firms and some vendor executives.

IIAR Independent Analyst Firm of The Year

The IIAR Independent Analyst Firm of The Year 2014 is Constellation.

The runner ups are HfS and ex-aequo for the third place Ventana and SMB Group.

Said Constellation’s chief Ray Wang (LinkedIn, @RWang0): “We’re excited to be recognised by the analyst relations community for bringing Silicon Valley insights, innovative solutions, and market leading buy side clients together into the broader constellation of research.  It’s always an honour to be recognised and we appreciate all the hard work influence relations professionals face in navigating their organisation’s mission and the mission that industry analysts and influencers play.

 IIAR New Firm of The Year

The IIAR New Analyst Firm of The Year 2014 is Digital Clarity Group.

Said a respondent “Digital Clarity is composed of smart, free-thinking and experienced analysts who follow their gut and provide tailored guidance.

More details will be provided to IIAR members during a call on the 15/1/15. It’s striking however to see that Forrester is a fertile ground for new firms -spawning both Constellation and DCG…

Thanks to Helen Chantry (LinkedIn) and Trevor Howard (LinkedIn) for their invaluable contributions to this research.

Read also:

Past winners

The IIAR Analyst of The Year has been running since 2008, see below the past winners.

  • The IIAR Analyst Firm of The Year 2012 were IDC and Ovum
  • The IIAR Analyst Firm of The Year 2011 was Gartner
  • The IIAR Analyst Firm of The Year 2010 was Gartner
  • The IIAR Analyst Firm of The Year 2009 was Gartner
  • The IIAR Analyst Firm of The Year 2008 was Forrester
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