IIAR Around In 10 Questions – Institute of Industry Analyst Relations (IIAR) https://analystrelations.org The IIAR is a not-for-profit organisation established to raise awareness of analyst relations and the value of industry analysts, promote best practice amongst analyst relations professionals, enhance communication between analyst firms and vendors, and offer opportunities for AR practitioners to network with their industry peers. Tue, 23 Jul 2019 08:50:57 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 76177372 Around Ricarda Rodatus from Oracle, IIAR> AR Team of the Year 2019 in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2019/07/08/around-ricarda-rodatus-from-oracle-iiar-ar-team-of-the-year-2019-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2019/07/08/around-ricarda-rodatus-from-oracle-iiar-ar-team-of-the-year-2019-in-10-questions/#comments Mon, 08 Jul 2019 15:16:33 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=305898
Ricarda Rodatus / VP Analyst Relations, Oracle (IIAR website)

Ricarda Rodatus (@rodatusrLinkedIn) is the VP of Analyst Relations at Oracle, leading the analyst relations team recognised  last Thursday night as the IIAR> AR Team Of The Year 2019 discloses which analyst she misses the most and reveals a French secret.

  1. What’s been your career path to becoming an AR pro?
    After a diverse career mostly in  product marketing and communication – locally & globally, hardware & software – I honed my AR skills over the past 5 years as global AR lead at Oracle. Throughout my path in the workplace I tried to always keep true to my passions of being a culturally-aware relationship all-rounder, enthusiastic about products, creating awareness & demand, focused on building world-class teams, processes, and structures to serve an ever so demanding stakeholder community. I would still define myself as a marketing generalist, having customer needs and audience desires at the heart of my every day focus.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analyst Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    The analyst market place is definitely changing and transforming looking at the firm landscape, the vendor environment, and the customers transformation. Customers are definitely more educated today and more informed than ever before. Customers these days have much more choice to obtain vendor performance evaluations based on peer reviews, crowd sourcing, and online consulting. There is a big and broad community out there needing and providing services. New communication channels are created every day to serve customers with information and supporting them for their decision taking needs. Analysts are still very important, yet need to adjust and adapt to a new set of customers, new buying behavior, and new competing forces.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    There is no such thing as a typical day. Of course I have a regular cadence with my team, our executive stakeholders and the analysts, managing more or less regular events, and regular reports. Yet every day is different, needs creative adjustment, agile answers to newly rising questions. Of course I work hard, yet I’m also finding time to play – walking, hiking, and running with my dog, which gives me creative ideas for the job at hand, lightbulb moments for previously seemingly unsolvable past issues, and forward-looking ideas for innovative strategy adjustments.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an Analyst horror story (no names mentioned)?
    I guess I was really lucky throughout my AR career to not encounter anything that would qualify as a horror story. Not even remotely. Yes there is pressure from many different sides, there are difficult situations, and we face tough conversations within Oracle and with our analysts, yet I feel we are always able to work out hardships and in the end time and dedicated hard work will always heal all wounds.
  5. How does your company structure its AR team?
    We are very logically and simply structured around our product portfolio & solutions, industries and regions. We have a technical focus on product development- and management on the one side and a go-to-market focus on marketing and demand gen on the other side. We have a very flat hierarchy. And we try to give our AR Managers at least 2 coverage pillars to focus on, and cross-functional responsibilities for everyone to be able to support our team success. 
  6. Tell us about one good experience you have had with an analyst or analyst firm?
    I specifically enjoy working with one fairly big analyst firm where I feel we have a similar value system, we speak the same language, we often use the same words looking at the same strategic challenges. They are like us very customer-focused, trying to deliver creative customer assets. They are always keen to show up at our events, while we are also making a good showing at their events. It feels like a partnership, where we value their enthusiastic engagement, and value their fair judgement.
  7. Which analyst firm do you miss that’s been acquired or analyst that’s left the industry?
    Vernon Turner, Ex-IDC. I liked his calm and composed demeanor, his broad view and detailed analysis. I enjoyed the conversations with him, and valued him as an experienced analyst, and interesting human being. 
  8. What’s your favorite niche analyst firm and why?
    G2. They started as a Peer Review firm, added research based on the customer voice, and just recently customer consulting to their charter. As a newcomer they hired capable talent, acquired great financial funding, and constantly adjust their model in an agile way.
  9. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I like a little casual place called “Chouquet’s” on Fillmore Street in San Francisco. It’s close to our home, I can take our dog there, my business partners enjoy the laid-back atmosphere, it gets the sun almost all day (if the sun is out and about), and it’s French J.
  10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    How to amplify our valuable assets even more inside and outside the company – with our employees, sales force, with customers and prospects. We need to use our current assets, find more assets, and get them through the appropriate channels to the right audience, looking at the digital experience of our customers and analysts.

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Around Peggy O’Neill, IIAR> AR Professional of the Year 2019 in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2019/07/05/around-peggy-oneill-iiar-ar-professional-of-the-year-2019-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2019/07/05/around-peggy-oneill-iiar-ar-professional-of-the-year-2019-in-10-questions/#comments Fri, 05 Jul 2019 15:16:16 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=305874
Peggy O'Neill, Senior Director Analyst Relations @ Informatica

Peggy O’Neill / VP Analyst Relations, Informatica,  (@pegoneillLinkedIn) and former IIAR> Board Member was recognised yesterday night as the IIAR> AR Professional Of The Year 2019 and shares today some insights for the AR community.

Congratulations Peggy!

  1. What’s been your career path to becoming an AR pro? 
    I’m a former Gartner analyst who got recruited into analyst relations by Oracle.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analyst Marketplace and where do you see it going? 
    Industry analysts have an important role in the tech ecosystem, they help customers, vendors, investors make sense of it all.
  3. What’s your typical day like? 
    Briefings, inquiries, and nagging my colleagues for materials to send to analysts.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an Analyst horror story (no names mentioned)?
    I’m lucky to work with a good group of analysts, can’t really think of anything horrifying off the top of my head.
  5. How does your company structure its AR team? 
    By product line.
  6. Tell us about one good experience you have had with an analyst or analyst firm?
    At Informatica World recently one of our senior executives was struggling with a demo in his keynote that wasn’t working. I had a dozen industry analysts sitting in the audience and was bracing myself for some snarky tweets as the demo failed repeatedly. It was an irresistible opportunity to poke fun and we didn’t get a single negative tweet. Analysts can be kinder than you give them credit for.
  7. Which analyst firm do you miss that’s been acquired or analyst that’s left the industry? 
    Doug Laney at Gartner.
  8. What’s your favorite niche analyst firm and why? 
    Tough to single out one, we work with a bunch of them at Informatica.
  9. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share? 
    Italian cuisine is my favorite
  10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    Two Magic Quadrants and a Vendor Rating refresh in the next six months. Slides for an internal meeting next week.

Guest IIAR> posts by Peggy

IIAR> Best Practice Paper by Peggy

IIAR> community involvement from Peggy

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Around Soichi Nakajima from IDATE DigiWorld in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2018/12/17/around-soichi-nakajima-from-idate-digiworld-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/12/17/around-soichi-nakajima-from-idate-digiworld-in-10-questions/#comments Mon, 17 Dec 2018 11:02:28 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=263320 Following our IIAR Webinar with Soichi NakajimaSoichi Nakajima / IDATE DigiWorld, Digital Telco Practice Lead (@NakajimaSoichiLinkedIn) at IDATE DigiWorld, here’s his interview in ten questions.

1. What are your coverage areas?
I cover all things Internet services and players; if you want to talk about the GAFA(M), FAMGA (yes it’s the same thing), FANG, BAT(X)… I’m all yours. To add a bit of flavor, I specifically take a telecommunication angle to cover the intersections of the Internet and telco worlds. Naturally this leads me to cover the US and China often, but being based in France we also have great European coverage, and it helps being Japanese to cover the Far East.

 

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
Let me give you a market cliché; there’s so much data around today but nobody knows what to do with it. Analysis of yesterday was about collecting the data, whereas analysis of today is about filtering the data. I believe the days of long, descriptive reports are long gone, and what we need are sharp, adaptable, to-the-point, relative and critical analyses.

 

3. What’s your typical day like?
The day starts with grinding fresh coffee beans… by hand, never with a machine! I’m an early starter and often first in the office, and would often start with calls to the Far East (which is already in the afternoon due to the time difference). Maybe a few games of table football/baby-foot/kicker would follow, and lunch in the garden. Oh yes, I do some work too… writing reports, talking to clients, brainstorming with colleagues, you get the picture. Or, I’m travelling.

 

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
What’s my company name again? Oh yeah… IDATE. Need I say more? No, we are not a dating company, we are not i-DATE!

 

5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
We are actually over 40 years old, and based in France, which already makes us unique in this field. We have three axes of business; consulting, research and Institute. The first two are self-explanatory, but the Institute makes us a bit different. It is essentially a membership program to which we have 70+ members as of today, from various industries large and small. We operate “breakfast clubs” driven by these members every month in London, Paris and Brussels, where very interactive discussions take place. These activities then fuel our research and consulting activities, creating a nice little virtuous cycle. Oh by the way I am in charge of these clubs in London.

 

6. What is your research methodology?
Well I will end up repeating a little bit of what I mentioned above, but apart from the standard blabla of primary and secondary research, interviews etc., I really do believe what sets us apart is our access to the Institute members for real first-hand opinions and trends. On a personal note I’m a strong believer of the personal touch, and will try to implement this in my works.

 

7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
Ah. I have come to learn that this type of question is a booby trap… I will always, always forget to mention someone. That said, I would certainly like to thank Ludovic Leforestier who gave me this opportunity, who also happens to be a top bloke.

 

8. What are your offerings and key deliverables?
We cover mainly the telecom, media and Internet fields. Our line of business is split into 5 main domains: fixed (such as FTTx), wireless (typically 5G), media (digital contents, video…), IoT, and digital telcos (Internet and telecom services).

 

9. Hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
I love both watching and playing football… so much so that I am the official organizer of 5-a-side football matches within our company. Some of my colleagues know me more for my football organizing skills rather than my analytical skills! The beer afterwards is always great too.

 

10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
Am I allowed to mention the Brexit?

 

Check also this post-webinar interview below

Post IIAR Webinar interview with Soichi Nakajima / Digital Telcos Practice Leader (@NakajimaSoichiLinkedIn) with Ludovic Leforestier (@lludovicLinkedIn) from the IIAR Board.

Other IIAR Around in 10 Questions

 

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Around Giorgio Nebuloni from IDC in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2018/09/04/around-giorgio-nebuloni-from-idc-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/09/04/around-giorgio-nebuloni-from-idc-in-10-questions/#respond Tue, 04 Sep 2018 15:04:44 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=243055

We have had the pleasure for Giorgio taking time out of his busy schedule to take part in our infamous 10 questions. Giorgio is a research director for IDC’s  European Infrastructure and Cloud research and leads the team of analysts responsible for tracking the cloud infrastructure, server, storage and converged systems markets in Western Europe.

What are your coverage areas?

My main focus area is European infrastructure, a broad spectrum of things ranging from Multicloud management software to service provider datacenters. I’m also increasingly involved in this year’s research sprints (we call them Launchpads) around emerging technologies (Quantum, Edge, Blockchain…) driven by brilliant analysts across multiple IDC teams.

What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?

Analysing the analysts! Three trends I see: the traditional need for ad-personam advisory to IT buyers is not only steady but increasing. With technology topics becoming ever more complex (see the interdependencies of Multicloud, or political nature of Blockchain use cases or AI’s ethical dilemmas), leaders need fact-and face-based opinions more than ever. The second is the changing nature of data. Data are the wheels of any self-respecting research vehicle. In the 3rd Platform era, generating data differently, from new sources and manipulating it better and faster than ever before is crucial. The third is the growing connection between branding, marketing and analyst house services – i.e. the analyst company becoming a digital agency.

What’s your typical day like?

The day starts at breakfast or in the bus, swiping through emails. After that it’s a lot of “Can you guys hear me alright?”, pulling out the toothpaste at security LHR T2 and providing feedback on reports and deliverables. The fun part are workshops or improvised whiteboard meetings with customers, and the unpredictable, sometimes heated conversations with IT buyers at our events. Also enjoyable are the rare isolation days (often in summer heat) with a piece of paper and pen, drawing the research agenda for the next months.

Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

Not a horror – but a thriller story. I’ve once attended an analyst event linked to a broader customer conference where the facilities were just not fit (or not booked properly). The poor AR person spent two days leading a bunch of analysts (distracted fellas in general) across ultra-crowded, immense halls from one meeting room to another, holding a tourist guide sign and a megaphone. In rare cases did the analysts arrive on time. In some cases they never made it to the meeting room. I think a couple of analysts are still roaming in that conference center (haven’t seen them since). In another case I flew into Vegas on the promise of an analyst track with executives – except there was no such thing, only technical sessions. Learnt my lesson on asking for agendas then!

What is your research methodology?

The ideas stem from anecdotal discussions with “Pathfinder” IT buyers and other IDC analysts. The proof points from primary research in form of small to large surveys. The hard data on market numbers from vendor conversations and guidance process.

Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?

Most of AR folks I know are great and enable easy access to vendor executives. I’ve worked closely and for a long time with Jos Baltes (HPE) who is not only hyper-responsive but also great to get a beer with. Most recently Caroline Dennington (NetApp) adds the British humour (!) – Antonella Crimi (Equinix) and Anna Carzana (AMD) the Italian flair. I’m missing several I know – impossible to mention all!

Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.

I’ve recently attended a one-day analyst-only event where keynotes were kept to less than 1 hour and most of the day was spent on one-to-ones, with some breaks in between. I thought it was great – even if I ended up talking myself dry. A good AR practice is booking events in the calendar well in advance – even if analysts themselves are sloppy RSVPers!

What are your offerings and key deliverables? 

Within my team, we deliver on a subscription program with report, surveys and customer enquiries; release multiple Tracker datasets on a quarterly basis and work on challenging custom project advising vendors and buyers on infrastructure-related decisions. A recent one I liked was advisory work for a custom chipset manufacturer to identify and position their Edge Computing and Gateway strategy.

Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?

With a mixed Asian-Italian family we are way too fussy about food. For the Londoners – L’oro di Napoli in South Ealing. For the Frankfurters – Sushi Boy in Eschersheimer Tor; Lam Freres in Bahnhofsviertel.

What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?

Selecting what NOT to do or cover is the tough one for the next 6 months. With Innovation Accelerators kicking off it’s like the candy shop, but one can’t do everything properly! Next 30 minutes getting home on time for dinner!

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Around Gartner’s Fabio Di Capua in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2018/03/23/around-fabio/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/03/23/around-fabio/#respond Fri, 23 Mar 2018 11:00:46 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=227581 This week, Gartner analyst Fabio Di Capua (Twitter / LinkedIn) has bravely volunteered to tackle the IIAR’s legendary 10 questions, renowned worldwide for their incisiveness. Research Director Fabio is based in Munich, Germany.

Fabio Di Capua

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    I cover a very broad area in Sourcing and Vendor Management Application Services. From SAP service provider selection to contract revision, Agile application development, MS Dynamics, Workday system integrator, Application Labor rates, Nearshore/Offshore, Outsourcing, and so on…
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    In this flood of Digital Initiatives from vendors, IT innovation and new services emerging every day, IT analysis is a critical element for vendors and clients.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    No single day is like another one… I basically try to balance between client inquiries (and take questions from Gartner clients on a wide range of topics), writing research (like Magic Quadrants, Market Guides and Best practices notes) and preparing presentations for our events. Sometime I also attend vendor events.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    No horror stories… just that twice I’ve arrived at an event and discovered that the hotel didn’t have reservation for me. All went well in the end and I didn’t need to sleep under a bridge – but it was the same vendor both times! Then there was the time I was on a call with a vendor, and after the AR had kicked off the call, I spent a good two minutes introducing myself, before handing over to the vendor’s subject matter expert – whose opening line was: “Is that Susan from Gartner?”
  5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
    I believe you all know Gartner business model, don’t you? 😉
  6. What is your research methodology?
    At Gartner, we have very detailed methodologies to follow in all our research. This goes through rigorous process with customer interactions, vendor briefings and multiple surveys.
  7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
    Best AR practice is where the meetings / presentations are spot on in terms of my research agenda, provide a good overview of company strategy and provide the possibility to meet with company executives to exchange views on their vision, their challenges and areas where they are working to improve.
  8. Any hobbies or favorite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I am Italian so you’d expect me to say I love football… but this is not the case. I like basketball, Formula 1, photography and red wine (at least this last one can be related to Italy, can’t it?). I like all kind of food, from sushi to steaks…
  9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 minutes?
    During the next 30 minutes, catching a flight back to Munich (yes, it’s delayed), and in the next 6 months to put everything in line for the 2019 MQ and prepare my presentation for our Sourcing and Vendor Management summit, while engaging with probably 200 clients in different topics.
  10. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
    There are so many excellent analysts at Gartner it’s very hard to choose!! So I’ll pass on this one! 🙂
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Around Margaret Adam from IDC in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2018/02/16/around-margaret-adam-from-idc-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/02/16/around-margaret-adam-from-idc-in-10-questions/#comments Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:56:43 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=224560 Margaret Adam / IDC for the IIAR around in 10 questions

This week, we’re delighted to present you some insights from the just promoted Margaret Adam / IDC (@madam_idc, LinkedIn, blog) with our world famous ten questions.

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    Officially, European Channels and Alliances, more broadly this really looks at all kinds of go-to-market and partnering relationships from traditional channel (distie, VAR, SI, MSP, ISV, etc) to new routes to market (marketplaces and cloud service brokerages) to non-traditional partners (start-ups, strategy consulting, industry cloud, digital agencies etc). Essentially, I look at routes to market and advise our customers on the optimum route to market in Europe both in the short term and longer term.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    Granted I’m biased, but I do see industry analysts playing a critical role in the industry, with such a broad view of the market, good analysts are able to spot the gaps (and even join the dots) between clients and what the industry offers them. In saying that, the skills profile and output has changed, I’ve been an analyst for about 11 years, but in that time, I’ve seen all aspects of the role evolve, and I’ve had to evolve my skills profile along with that.  It has become less about long, research-heavy reports and more about crystallising key messages – i.e. a very succinct, informed opinion (with the research credibility to back this as needed), I’ve had to learn how to do this on social, video /TV (which is a completely different skill set).  The pace is relentless too, with so much industry change, increasingly my role is more about storytelling and hypothesising now than putting a line in the sand, saying “this is what will happen”.  It’s fun but challenging and I think that pressure to build an informed opinion quickly will continue to put more traditional analyst roles under pressure.  In a nutshell, it’s far less about the past, but more about making a calculated guess about the future – and it all changes so quickly!
      
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    Lots and lots of conference calls and inquiries. I mean a lot.  But in all honesty, one thing I love about my job, is that I am never bored.  We do such diverse activities, research, writing, presenting, workshops, building predictions, consulting, advising and now increasingly shooting videos (!)–  it is never dull and always mentally stimulating.  I don’t know of any other job that offers that kind of diversity.
  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    After flying 12 hours, and contending with West Coast jet lag, attending an analyst event, where every single one of the execs scheduled for our one-on-ones were either late, no shows, or cancelled. I ended up with a whole lot of random meetings with people just because they were there, and neither party benefited (and it was like being on a series of awkward first dates!).  This kind of thing does happen, particularly at big customer events, and I realise its never really the AR’s fault, but I guess part of being a good AR, is being able to sell the value of analyst relations internally to the executives.  In this particular example, it was obvious that wasn’t the case.
  5. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
    There are many great AR professionals, but Signe Loenberg deserves a call out. She has always had a handle on my areas of coverage, connects me to the right people, and, is a really lovely person to just chat to.  Others that stand out are Anna Loftin (Dell), Michael Rennett (Red Hat), Antonella Crimini (Equinix) and Adele Breen (Hotwire).  I know I’ve missed a few (sorry!) but those some who’ve made a real impact.
  6. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
    This ties in to my horror story, but best practice for me for big events is to communicate upfront (and in advance) as to who it is we will likely be meeting. I’ve had all too many experiences of flying across the world, to not get the meetings I had hoped for and worse, to not have viable alternatives lined up. I know it is challenging to arrange these one-on-ones, but they are the main reason we attend WW events.   Good AR folk will ask us as to what kinds of execs, partners and customers we would like to meet in advance, and line up a plan B list in case first choice isn’t available.
  7. What are your offerings and key deliverables? 
    I run a research program (subscription) which is essentially a report and research series on all things channel, alliance and partnering in Europe. Customers to that service also have unlimited inquiry.  On top of that, we do a lot of channel-related consulting and advisory – notably around go-to-market strategy, partner prioritization, partner program best practice and partner enablement – but the mix can be pretty diverse as I mentioned before.
  8. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I’m a big walker, love walking the streets and parks of London with my faithful doggie by my side and whenever I travel (which is frequently) I like to build in time for a run and/or a walk (time permitting) to get to know a city on foot.
  9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    Never enough of it!  Otherwise, the ongoing challenge of trying to stay ahead of the direction the industry is moving and ensuring our analysis is valuable, insightful and actionable.
  10. Is there another analyst whose work  you rate highly?
    Yes, my boss, Phil Carter. He is without a doubt, one of the best blue-sky thinkers I’ve encountered in my analyst career, but essentially grounded and pragmatic too – a mix that is hard to find and very stimulating to work with.

Updated 5/12/18

Margaret was the IIAR Analyst Of The Year 2018.

 

Other IIAR Around in 10 Questions interviews

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Around Andy Butler / ex. Gartner in 10 questions…. https://analystrelations.org/2018/02/09/around-andy-butler-ex-gartner-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/02/09/around-andy-butler-ex-gartner-in-10-questions/#respond Fri, 09 Feb 2018 16:59:47 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=223443 Today we ask our probing questions to the well renowned Andy Butler (LinkedIn) just retired VP Distinguished Analyst at Gartner (Alumnus), who gives us his views on the the industry in 10 questions. Enjoy..

Andy Butler, ex. Gartner for the IIAR website

 

  1. How long have you been in the IT industry and where did you begin your
    career?
    I can claim a 45 year unbroken period in the industry. I left school at 18 and immediately started working, as I was not convinced that a university course would be necessary for where I wanted to go. Back then it was still possible to get into a profession without a degree; something that is much harder to achieve these days. I was able to join Nielsen Research, who employed school leavers with decent grades to be fast tracked into professional roles. After a few months working in a research QA function, I found a role as an RPG II programmer on their IBM System 3 Model 10. I then followed a typical “IT apprenticeship” through programming, systems analysis and finally IT management roles that evolved into various software and hardware product marketing positions at HP prior to joining Gartner in 1997.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analyst Marketplace and where do you see it going now that you have retired?
    When I left HP to join Gartner in 1997, my manager at the time asked me what I would do after being an analyst. It was a very interesting comment, as most people working in IT roles see themselves on a journey that will involve frequent role changes as their careers develop. But an analyst joins their company and probably stays in the same position for ever. Rather than have to hop from role to role, the analyst role stays firm, and the rest of the industry evolves in front of them – it’s like looking at an industry montage that is constantly morphing into something else. This is why longevity in the role is such an asset for an analyst – while it is often seen as the “kiss of death” in most other jobs! Ironically, the same applies to analyst relations professionals. The longer they are in their role, the more they understand the research eco-system and the greater an asset they become for their employer. But moving forward, analysts are not immune from the major industry shifts, and I expect to see more analysts re-pivoting their focus in order to maintain relevance and personal motivation.
  3. What was your typical day like and how would you like that to change for some of your ex colleagues?
    It is ideal for analysts to be able to engage with both vendors and consumers, as that enables the analyst to receive the story from both sides. Client inquiries – be they end-user or vendor – are therefore “King”, and really take priority over other activities. A typical day could have up to four or five 30-minute calls. Everything else needs to be fitted around this – mainly vendor briefings, internal research community tele-meetings, research note creation and preparing presentations for conferences or consulting engagements. But market success for any company dictates a growing level of internal bureaucracy, which in turn leads to a more prescriptive working environment. This is a dangerous trend for analysts who need a degree of creative freedom to do their job properly. Satisfying the demand to reserve more and more time for inquiries – which might never happen – makes it harder for analysts to put themselves in the “zone”.
  4. Now, tell me an analyst horror story now that you have nothing to hide and lots of people to embarrass?
    The worst experience – for me – in the entire 20 years as an analyst occurred a decade or so ago, when three of us attended a vendor event in Berlin. I won’t name names, as things became very messy and one person (not me) was most unfairly treated as a result. There were maybe 15 analysts in total at this one day briefing, and right from the outset things did not go well. The event was very well organised by an expert AR crew, but there was no corporate message. We all assumed the event was planned to impart some major news, and the decision was then taken to postpone the revelation. Rather than cancel the whole thing (which would have made sense), the vendor soldiered on and delivered assorted trivia that just did not justify the travel. The whole group of analysts became very antsy and annoyed.
    To make matters worse, a new senior manager had joined the vendor – determined to show his peers and us how wonderful he was. But things really went south after lunch, when all the analysts had one-on- one sessions booked. From the start of the Gartner session, this new “demigod” manager made it clear he had zero time for analysts. We tried one line of questioning after another, and his responses were defensive, sarcastic and downright confrontational. Eventually, I refused to continue and walked out of the session, and sat the rest of the afternoon out. This manager went berserk – enraged that a lowly analyst would dare to walk out on him. The event sadly damaged the Gartner relationship with the vendor for a while. It led to demands for Gartner to fire me. Worst of all, it had severe ramifications for the excellent AR folks, who were totally blameless. Luckily for the vendor, the demigod was soon gone – off to preach his poisonous management style at another unfortunate vendor.
  5. Where do you see Gartner going now they have killed off most of the competition and are moving into more business functions with CEB?
    Any market or industry needs competition to create a fertile business environment; without someone to fear, or respect, or admire, we become fat, lazy and complacent. The IT research market is no exception. Ideally, both vendors and end-users should engage with one or more “big” research companies, like Gartner, but also engage with multiple smaller research houses that will be more specialised by geography, vertical or market practice. No research house – big or small – can ever get things constantly right. Only by engaging with two or more advisors can people look out for conflicting guidance that means at least one advisor is wrong. The advantage for a very large research house is that when times are economically tight, vendors and end-users are more likely to jettison the specialist advice rather than the larger, more generic advisor. But I would never advise anyone to rely on a single research house – Gartner included – for all of their guidance. The acquisition of CEB creates new competitive dynamics for Gartner, where the company will meet new rivals who also have considerable reputations in their own respective fields. Meanwhile, there will always be gaps or weaknesses in the Gartner portfolio that existing or aspiring research operations can and should exploit.
  6. What advice would you give to up and coming aspiring analysts joining Gartner or any other research firms?
    Being an analyst is the best job in the world; but it isn’t for everyone. Analysts stay in place for a very long time; often for the rest of their working career. If they do move on, it is usually to join a vendor in some sort of “evangelist” role. Smart analysts never burn their bridges. It is quite normal for analysts to “drop out” to work for a vendor for a few years, and then come right back in to the same company. There is no stigma in doing this; in fact, the experience will often be seen as beneficial. And if an analyst “escapes” a big research house like Gartner, before they know it they might end up back in the fold as smaller research houses are brought on board! When openings have arisen, I have often thought of people for whom I have a great professional regard, but discounted them as likely analysts.
    It helps to be cynical, but don’t worry – the job will make anyone cynical soon enough! To me, analysts have to be a bit maverick, and that is a trait you cannot switch on and off. If your job teaches you to spot vendor BS a mile off, you will recognise Gartner management BS just as quickly. So as the dead hand of bureaucracy and political chicanery becomes ever stronger in our industry, analysts need to know how to play the system. For people like myself, I had reached that happy medium where I had amassed enough money to retire (I think!), but still have enough health and energy to enjoy it. But I have been hugely impressed by the calibre of people coming into the analyst community of late, and this make me absolutely confident that our business value is set to endure.
  7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention?
    As I stated earlier, AR professionals mature in their role, just as analysts do. I consider many AR folks to be among my most valued friends, and it is hard to single any one person out. To me, analysts and AR folks are two sides of the same coin. We share many common attributes, and there should maybe be more examples of analysts becoming AR folks, and vice versa. So I see people like Jos Baltes (HPE), Signe Loenberg (Loenberg AR), Irene Mirageas (Dell), Garrett Mulcahy (Teradata) and Keith Clarke (SUSE) being huge and enduring assets to the companies they serve; but I also see superb people coming through with many more years to give, such as Michael Rennett (Red Hat) and Anna Loftin (Dell).
  8. Tell us about one good AR practice you have experienced or one good AR event you have attended?Many analysts regard AR folks to be “gatekeepers”, who exist to be a barrier between them and the vendor contacts they really want to reach. Maybe a few AR people do fall into that category, but I think they are a minority. AR people do not exist to blindly persuade analysts to accept a vendor position – even when they privately know that position is garbage. Let the marketing people worry about that nonsense! To me, AR folks are more like a referee, and referees only succeed when both sides respect them. Nowhere does this become more obvious than when a contentious document like a Magic Quadrant is in progress. A gate can open two ways, and quality AR people become a vital interconnect that also protects the analysts from the over-zealous enthusiasm of fanatical engineers and marketing people. I think it is always important for analysts to remember that for every messy escalation that consumes time and energy, a good AR person has probably fended off five or six other situations that could have become just as fraught. A great AR person will know which battles are worth fighting, and when it’s best to advocate a truce between the analyst and the marketeers.
  9. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly outside of Gartner and one from Gartner?
    I always prefer to look out the windscreen rather than through the rear view mirror; Gartner has so many great analysts and they do not need a plug from me here. But what pleases me the most is the great new blood coming in. I would single out Scot MacLellan, who is a superb analyst based in Rome, and Daniel Bowers, who is based in Houston, as great examples of why Gartner will continue to be a formidable influence on this industry.
    But the beauty of the analyst community is that virtually all analysts respect and admire each other. We may play for different “teams”, but there is a camaraderie in this community that is have found hugely rewarding. Again, it’s hard to single out one or two when there are so many that contribute massively to the market. But analysts like Tony Lock (Freeform Dynamics) and Clive Longbottom (QuoCirca) always impress me with the breadth of market coverage that they are able to expertly address.
  10. What are you going to do now you have retired to fill your time? Would you be interested in still dabbling in the IT industry and a part timer in between your holidays and posting jokes on facebook?This industry fascinates me as much today as it did a decade ago, and we all know the degree of radical change is just accelerating year by year. So I am sure I will stay just as nosy and inquisitive going forward. It will be great to keep in touch through the IIAR, and vicariously follow the exploits of analyst friends as they continue their work. I am dreading the next really big event, like a major acquisition. I will know that email, Lync and phone links are buzzing with ideas and speculation about what might happen or what should happen; I will also have a bunch of opinions, and I will be jealous that there is no way to get those across. But I will enjoy being able to lead life at a pace that suits me, and dabbling is a great word to explain my hopes and ambitions. My goal is to be involved in the odd project here and there, while also allowing me to take time out to travel and enjoy life. That would be an ideal medium.

 

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Around Vernon Turner from Causeway Connections in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2018/01/19/around-vernon-turner-from-causeway-connections-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2018/01/19/around-vernon-turner-from-causeway-connections-in-10-questions/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 11:54:35 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=217509 Today we ask our probing questions of VernonVernon Turner / Causeway Connections (IIAR Around in 10 Questions) Turner (LinkedIn, @vernonxt)  Principal and Chief Strategist at Causeway Connections.

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    All things Internet Of Things tend to be my opening conversation piece, but given my experience in the ICT industry, the topics quickly go to enterprise infrastructure (including the network side), mobility, carriers, cloud), and now the trendy Blockchain, AI, and Digital Twin gets mentioned. The only thing missing is the kitchen sink.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    I really think that the industry is ripe for disruption and new business models will emerge. I don’t just mean the way we have the Tier 1, 2 and the rest – I mean how we address an integrated delivery model between B2B2C and the analysts.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    Each morning, once I can put both feet on the ground and know that I’m alive, then it’s time to treat each day as an opportunity to give back. While I probably spend ¼ of the day researching, I spend ½ talking and meeting customers, and the rest of the day being involved in some form of community give back.
  4. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
    I am the principal and chief strategist for my company. Born out of my hands on experience and given the nature of the capabilities of emerging technologies such as IoT and Analytics, I feel that customers are looking for the complete end to end solution today, We look at the work and information flow for a customer and layer over the internal, external technology and business processes. We are very much a user-based business.
  5. What is your research methodology?
    Everybody has an opinion, and as a result of that, everyone thinks that they have the best solution. I have always believed in a mix of quantitative, qualitative, and personal experience to give the best advice. To that end, I’m a huge fan of primary research, focus groups, and actual hands on implementation experience with the client. In other words, I don’t take the client up to the restaurant door, rather, I go in with them and sit down and eat with them to make sure that my initial recommendation was accurate.
  6. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
    I have 3 favorite AR professionals – Signe Loenberg, Caroline Dennington and Rachel Kuta. They are the best matchmakers between executives and analysts. They are well prepared for meetings and events. Their meetings are always high value – and for years, they all have put up with my stupid Irish sense of humour.
  7. What are your offerings and key deliverables?
    We offer strategic advice in the form quantitative, qualitative reports, always delivered through aa series of workshops. The individual high touch model is critical part of the customer service model. In addition, we can be found at global events, either keynoting or moderating panels. Finally, we are a matchmaker and influencer between the end user and the IT company, and will establish new eco-system models for everyone to succeed.
  8. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I love just about any sport and any food – so at my edge I have to run everyday to stop me swelling up to the size of a water buffalo. Seriously, though, I love to run , but run for a charity causes – it gives a more sincere reason for wanting to finish a marathon.
  9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    I love, love, love where the market is today – there is so much great technology out there to change the way we live and run our economies. However, I got too few minutes in each day that I’m scared that I’ll miss something.
  10. Is there another analyst whose work  you rate highly?
    Paul Teich – he’s a genius and a gentleman.

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Around Penny Jones / 451 in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2017/08/04/around-penny-jones-451-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/08/04/around-penny-jones-451-in-10-questions/#respond Fri, 04 Aug 2017 15:16:20 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=153594 Today we ask our probing questions of Penny Jones (LinkedIn@PennyJones451)  Principal Analyst, MTDC & Managed Services at 451 Research.

Penny Jones, 451 Research (IIAR website)

  1. What are your coverage areas?

    I cover the European multi-tenant datacenter (colocation – wholesale and retail) markets and hosting and managed services. I focus mostly on the business proposition of providers and geographic and other trends affecting these industries.

  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?

    The market is evolving – and it needs to. The way technology is being consumed and delivered is changing rapidly, and in many cases, this means that the ways in which particular elements of the market are measured and reported on also need to adapt to reflect changing trends such as hybrid cloud, IoT, even external impacts such as Brexit and data regulations, etc. This includes my side of the market, where the days of being able to view colocation as a real estate play are long gone. Analyst firms and analysts will increasingly be required to alter the way they view markets as they continue to progress to answer the questions put forward by the IT industry, investors and others relying on insight into the market.

  3. What’s your typical day like?

    In my world, this isn’t such a thing as a typical day. One day could begin with a trip to City Airport to visit a client, tour a datacenter or conduct briefings in country. The next could start with yoga, a coffee, then writing of reports. The third day could start with an international inquiry call on the European market, or with my head down working on a deadline for an advisory report. Events such as Brexit, or the removal of Safe Harbour, or a large acquisition often require me to drop everything, focus on associated research while I sit back and wait for the phone to ring – because it inevitably will.

  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

    I am one of those people that prefer to be at the airport three hours prior to an international flight (ok, maybe 2 if leaving from City Airport or if I am only skipping over the Channel). Either way, any time I am at an event and AR books a car for me leaving only an hour to arrive and get to the gate is a horror story. I once got stuck in traffic heading to JFK and only made my flight because it happened to be half an hour delayed!

 

  1. What is your research methodology?
    Dealing with clients and focusing on providers positioned across Europe (and I should mention, I like to cover not only providers but the demand side of the market so we could also be talking about SIs, enterprises etc) I have to rely on a fair bit of phone contact – each briefing tends to last around an hour. That said, physically visiting sites and meeting face-to-face is a large part of my job, and I would say for every phone briefing there is an in person meeting scheduled. This means I am quite well set up for remote working. On top of collecting a lot of figures, which we tie into some of the 451 Research data products, most of my conversations are around technical details, company strategy and market overview. In most cases, I do not have a tick-list, and the conversation will work both ways. My work requires me to write reports on individual companies, M&A activity, long-form reports on markets (London, Amsterdam, Frankfurt and Paris), and markets (covering every country in Europe, and increasingly MEA). I also work closely with the rest of the analyst team and data teams at 451 Research, and as well as information they produce appearing in some of my own insights, these also feature heavily in presentations, webinars and other activities carried out.
     
  2. Any favourite restaurant or food that you’d like to share?

    I am Australian, so I love a good flat white and brunch on a weekend (the more interesting the better – not your standard English breakfast). As for hobbies, sitting at a desk for quite a few hours a day, and week, means exercise is incredibly important, and yoga especially helps clear my mind (especially when working on many reports, covering many topics, at once!).

  3. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?

    I am glad this said the ‘next’ 30 minutes, as I spent the last thinking over these questions. I am currently sitting here listening to Trump on the radio as I work – my 30 minute challenge will be to sustain a smile. My 6- month challenge? I am closely monitoring what Brexit means for the European and UK MTDC and hosting market and keeping up with the ever-evolving outcome of this will continue to be a challenge. I am also planning a wedding (how hard can it be?).

  4. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?

    While I have covered my industry for many years now, I have only been an analyst for the last few. I am always in awe of the deep insight many of my colleagues at 451 Research have in the market, in particular our founders William Fellows, John Abbott, Nick Patience and Andy Lawrence as well Rory Duncan and Kelly Morgan from my own team. All have such deep knowledge of their industries, but also of the processes required for proper objective analysis into the market. Their work goes beyond individual reports and advisory, I can also admire them for sharing their knowledge and showing support across the group.

  5. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.

    I have had some great experiences at AR events targeting analysts with in-depth knowledge of individual companies. Colocation and cloud providers, as well as managed service providers, are going through an unprecedented amount of change at the moment and deep dives into strategy and company positioning are increasingly important so we can stay up to date on company strategy but also understand why companies might be adopting new products and services and omitting others. The days I have attended recently – and increasingly – offer increased insight. This becomes even more important when we can discuss attitudes and observations on trends such as Brexit, data regulations and vertical industry take up of services.

 

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Around Tracy Shouldice / Trend Micro in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2017/07/12/around-tracy-shouldice-trend-micro-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2017/07/12/around-tracy-shouldice-trend-micro-in-10-questions/#respond Wed, 12 Jul 2017 19:02:51 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=177914 IIAR AR Professional of the YearTracy Shouldice / Trend Micro (blog, @TracyShouldice, LinkedIn) is the IIAR AR Professional of the Year 2017 – North America and kindly accepted to share a bit about him and what led to this award.

Tracy Shouldice / Trend Micro is the IIAR AR Professional of the Year 2016 - North America1. What’s been your career path to becoming an AR pro?

 I’ve been in & around AR for 20 years now.  In the late 1990s I realized that nobody at my company at the time was paying attention to these important influencers, but that we needed to.  My company was a small startup at the time; my boss said, “well, if you can backfill your Marcom job, you can work with the analysts.”  Since then, I’ve done AR at Entrust, Cognos, Nortel (RIP) and now Trend Micro.  I also worked four years at Forrester, which gave me good perspective on the inner workings of research firms and their analysts.

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analyst Marketplace and where do you see it going?

The biggest trend I’ve been thinking about is that from the perspective of the IT buyer:  there is Gartner; and there is the highly-fragmented collective of everyone else.  Gartner has earned its way to its dominant position in the research/advisory space with exceptional execution and some clever acquisitions – so by no means am I trying to trivialize its well-earned success.

But unlike some industry watchers, I do not believe that the end of the traditional analyst firm is near, by any measure.

The smaller analyst firms simply cannot compete with Gartner for the minds of the IT buyer in the large/very large enterprise.  Big IT is not typically going to drop seven figures of technology investment based on a blog post by an independent, or an anonymous peer review.

So the question is:  who is willing (and able) to throw down the gauntlet and challenge Gartner as a legitimate second opinion for the IT buyer?  I see many smaller niche players out there (pun intended) and some visionaries (ditto), but I’m sure I speak for many AR peers (and also from the IT perspective) in saying that a little competition at the high end of the market would be a good thing to keep the landscape vibrant.  The opportunity is there … but who will step up?

3. What’s your typical day like?

One thing that I have always loved about AR is that there really are no two days alike.  Sometimes we interact with analysts on the phone, sometimes at conferences, sometimes over email.  Sometimes you are doing the talking; and sometimes you’re listening.  Hopefully a good balance of both.

And we get involved with everyone in our company, north-south and east-west (execs, product experts, evangelists, marketing, etc.).

It’s this variety, and working with super-smart people, that keep things interesting!

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an Analyst horror story?

There was one event – a large user-group conference hosted by my company – in which we had hired an analyst to deliver the Day One keynote address.  It was at 9:00am, with over 1,000 people in the room.  He showed up at 8:15 – with no computer, no slides, nothing.  He assumed that I would have his slides already cued up (through some sort of magical process, apparently).  In fact, they were on a file server behind his firewall/VPN (did I mention he didn’t bring a PC?).  It was a mad scramble, but after some frantic phone calls and a tortuously slow download (this was before high-speed Internet, people!) we got the slides onto one of our computers in time for the presentation.

 

 

5. Tell us about one good experience you have had with an analyst or analyst firm?

Early in my AR career, I spent a lot of time with a relatively new analyst at a major firm.  I educated her on the general space that she covered, in addition to what my company itself did in that space.  She really appreciated the time I spent with her, sending me a really sincere “thank-you” note for my efforts to make her smarter in the space she covered.  She later provided me with a glowing reference for another AR position I was competing for.

 

6. Which analyst firm do you miss that’s been acquired or analyst that’s left the industry?

I think META Group … and not from the perspective of individual analysts (many of the analysts acquired by Gartner are still there, and provide great coverage).  But there was something about META’s culture – their analysts were very accessible and liked to have fun in a refreshing, self-deprecating kind of way – and I think that element of the company’s personality got lost over time.

Plus, they were a legitimate “second opinion” to Gartner in the large enterprise IT advisory space (see my other answer, above) – and I truly believe that this is a void that needs to be filled.

 

7. What’s your favorite niche analyst firm and why?

We’ve been going a lot of good work with Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG).  While not as big as Gartner or Forrester, they have really good people and we’ve found that their analysts are very smart and capable.  The firm is also very client-focused:  I appreciate their flexibility and willingness to collaborate with us in many different and creative ways.

 

8. Any hobbies that you’d like to share?

I am an avid distance runner.  I started running seven years ago; I’ve run three marathons now, and more half-marathons than I can count.  I run for charity, and will often join forces with other runners to raise funds for those less fortunate.  Over the last seven years, I estimate that my running teammates and I have raised over $120,000 for some very worthy causes.  It’s a privilege to be able to run, and to help others in the process.

 

9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?

For the next 6 months: I think the biggest challenge we face right now (and believe we are not alone on this front) would be the “peer review” properties popping up everywhere (think Gartner Peer Insights, G2 Crowd, TrustRadius, etc.).  Some of these are analyst-branded or will soon be.  The challenge with these is scale:  the reviews require that your customers to fill out extensive surveys, and there are only so many favours of that sort that one can ask of even one’s most fervent customer advocates.  I think that addressing these sites strategically will be the toughest nut for AR pros to crack this year.

I also challenge representatives from analyst firms who may read this to think about these sites strategically – while they are certainly an opportunity to build the business, are you perhaps undermining the perceived value of your own research and advisory services?

Challenge for the next 30 minutes:  getting onto my briefing call, on time. with my spokesperson!

 

10. In your experience what’s the best way to get more engagement with the executives that you support?

I’m very lucky in that my executives already see the value of industry analysts in the IT purchase/decision-making process.  So it’s not difficult for me to convince them that analyst engagement is mission-critical.

I do believe that AR is a “virtuous-circle” proposition:  if you invest in the function, you reap the rewards and thereby earn more investment.  That said, the opposite also holds true:  if you neglect AR, you’ll fail abysmally … and thereby lose credibility and support.

So for those who need to “win over” their executives, I would suggest that you narrow the aperture of your AR program to the analysts who matter in context of the IT buyer (that is:  Gartner; Forrester; and one or two mid-tier firms like 451 or ESG).  Take a year and build out a set of meaningful, two-way interactions that establish credibility and goodwill with the analysts.  You’ll start to see the benefits of this approach pay off.  Then, overcommunicate those benefits with your executive stakeholders to build more support.  Rinse and repeat.

 

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Around Shawn Fitzgerald in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/12/04/around-shawn-fitzgerald-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/12/04/around-shawn-fitzgerald-in-10-questions/#respond Sun, 04 Dec 2016 23:16:38 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=139470 Today we ask our probing questions of Shawn Fitzgerald, (LinkedIn@IDC)Research Director, World Wide Digital Transformation Strategies at IDC. Shawn recently joined IDC 

IDC

  1. What are your coverage areas?

I’m responsible for leading and coordinating IDC’s World Wide Digital Transformation (DX) Strategies Practice and continuing to ensure IDC’s thought leadership in the digital economy. As you may already know, IDC estimates the economic value of DX to be $20T or more than 20% of global GDP.

  1. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?

The role and value we, as analysts, provide is tremendous and is ever more important to smart technology strategies. Today, technology is so core to businesses delivering on their brand promises, both products and services. Making a bad technology decision has such an impact on strategic and operational performance in a way that wasn’t the case 20 or 30 years ago. Conversely, making the right choices can enable break-through business performance and really create world-class customer differentiation capabilities. I’ve yet to meet successful business leaders who don’t want access to those insights.

  1. What’s your typical day like?

Most days are a blend of engaging your clients, research needs, learning, writing, and travel. Obviously the ability to prioritize these and execute successfully is the key to maximizing value to the firm, the clients, and keeping yourself balanced. Eating right and making time for exercise also enter the mix.

  1. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

I don’t have an AR horror story where it would be something of legend. What I do sometimes see, to my horror, are firms not messaging effectively about their products, services, or capabilities. Seeing so much investment getting the word out that misses the mark – that’s real tragedy to me. Thankfully, those experiences are very far and few between.

  1. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?

The nice thing about IDC is that it has such a great reputation and is a leading firm. One of my main goals is to ensure I live up to the brand promise and ideals of the firm. Thankfully you are surrounded by great people and an engaging culture. We are a thought leader in Digital Transformation today with some really compelling research coming down the pipe to continue to enhance our position in this space.

  1. What is your research methodology?

Because Digital Transformation (DX) is really a technology enabled business strategy or set of strategies, you need to have both quantitative analysis and the qualitative understanding of technology in the context of business. One of our 2017 goals include developing a set of cross-industry DX use (investment) case studies.

  1. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.

The better events are ones that provide the strategic roadmap for the analyst and also demonstrate, through client examples, how they improved the business. The more laborious events are feature/function-fests that talk about product without showcasing benefits, business impact, and the investment return for customers.

  1. Any hobbies or favorite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?

I was a competitive mountain biker B.C. (before children). Now we focus on cycling as a family and competing in any outdoor adventures.

  1. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 minutes?

Ensuring we maintain and execute on IDC’s Digital Transformation (DX) model in the most meaningful and compelling way for our clients. Digital is a term that is being thrown at everything today and my responsibility is to ensure IDC continues to be the reference standard in this space and that we are servicing our clients.

  1. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?

I think analysts that are both subject matter experts (SME’s) and able to help clients create value for customers. As part of the IDC Insights team, I look to folks like Bob Parker, Scott Lundstrom, Kimberly Knickle, and Kevin Prouty as professionals we can all model our work after successfully.

 

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Around Christian Renaud in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/08/02/around-christian-renaud-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/08/02/around-christian-renaud-in-10-questions/#respond Tue, 02 Aug 2016 12:29:24 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=118687 Christian Renaud / 451 Research (IIAR profile)Today we ask our probing questions of Christian Renaud from 451 Research. Iowa based Christian (LinkedIn, @xianrenaud) is Research Director for IoT (Internet of Things).  See all posts on The 451.

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    Internet of Things.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    I think the market is speciating between smaller boutique shops and larger numbers shops with specialists in the middle, like 451.
  3. What’s your typical day like?
    About 1/3 quiet contemplation, 1/3 briefings and meetings, and 1/3 complete chaos.

  4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    When an AR person takes it upon themselves to help rewrite a research report to make it into a marketing document for the firm. I know you said ‘story’ singular, but this is a recurring nightmare.
  5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
    We cover the business of technology innovation, in enterprises, consumer and carriers/operators. As you would expect, the primary customers for that analysis are enterprise adopters, carriers, vendors, and the financial community who invests in the innovation pipeline.
  6. What is your research methodology?
    451 does primary quantitative research in multiple areas, including IoT, with our proprietary enterprise and consumer technology panels, which I leverage alongside vendor and customer briefings as well as my own primary research.
  7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
    The most recent Fujitsu Forum in Tokyo was well executed, as was the most recent Cisco C-Scape event in Las Vegas.
  8. What are your offerings and key deliverables? 
    We have qualitative and quantitative research (written) as well as presentations (live), webinars, strategy days, and custom consulting projects.
  9. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    I enjoy time with my daughters when I am not traveling, and we all enjoy trying any food we have never tried before. Routine is the enemy.
  10. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    The IoT market is large and unbounded, so determining which areas to focus on (and which to ignore) with finite resources is my largest challenge.

 

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Around Annette Zimmermann in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/06/17/around-annette-zimmermann-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/06/17/around-annette-zimmermann-in-10-questions/#respond Fri, 17 Jun 2016 15:28:58 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=116870 Today we ask our probing questions of Annette Zimmerman from Gartner. Munich-based Research Director Annette (LinkedIn, @mobileann) is Agenda Manager for Gartner’s devices research – and she probably has more gadgets than you.

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?Annette Zimmermann
    My beat is very broad in comparison to many analysts. I cover personal technologies including devices, PCs and wearables, following firms like Apple, Microsoft, Google, Samsung to name but a few. I’m also tracking the IoT and specifically beacon technology and indoor positioning solutions from vendors like Cisco, Aruba and Estimote.
  1. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    It’s still a growing business with demand coming from vendors and IT-users alike. Industry specific knowledge is becoming more important.

  1. What’s your typical day like?
    Many hours per day on the phone with clients asking me EVERYTHING about the topics I cover; vendors telling me EVERYTHING about their strategy; WRITING; drafting presentations, discussing research with colleagues, and let’s not forget lots of travel across the globe.
  1. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    I have not been part of any disasters… well, nothing major apart from smaller technical glitches and getting stuck at an airport.
  1. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
    Gartner. Do I need to say more?
  1. What is your research methodology?
    Gartner has a comprehensive set of methodologies ranging from Hype Cycles that depict the progressions of different technologies over time to Magic Quadrants and forecast models. We also run many consumer and enterprise surveys every year. Producing research means taking all of these different sources into account including discussion with clients and vendors. And as a Gartner analyst, I’m lucky enough to be able to follow my mojo when it comes to further investigating technologies that I find fascinating or potentially disruptive to the market.
  1. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
    The perfect Analyst event is a mix of great content (and I mean where the vendor really wants to tell you something, not some marketing wash) and time to meet with the execs.
  1. Any hobbies or favorite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    Scuba diving, running, hiking, wine, dine & cooking. Favorite food? Hard to say. My main preference is probably French but I just as much enjoy a Bavarian beer garden and ethnic food.
  1. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 minutes?
    I am the Agenda Manager for Gartner’s devices research, that means I am part of the team that is shaping the research content that is written and presented to clients throughout the year. The second half of the year means planning for 2017.
  1. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?

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Around Katy Ring in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/05/30/around-katy-ring-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/05/30/around-katy-ring-in-10-questions/#respond Mon, 30 May 2016 19:48:58 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=113944 Today we ask our probing questions of Katy Ring (LinkedIn@451Research) Research Director for IT Services at the 451 Group (see all posts on The 451).

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?Katy Ring 451 Group
    I cover Cloud Transformation Services – basically how advanced technologies are used by consultancies and IT service companies to create and deliver offerings for digital transformation.
  1. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    It is much the same as other marketplaces – you have the large incumbents that everyone moans about but continue to use, the disruptive entrants that are the most fun to work for, and the mid-sized firms that are squeezed by both sides. One thing that does bother me about the IT Analysis Marketplace is the lack of young analysts coming through – in many geos this is a side effect of the death of industry trade journalism, which is where a lot of us began our careers. I’m pleased to say 451 is investing in a graduate Research Associate scheme to help address this.
  1. What’s your typical day like?
    I tend to have two different types of day: either I spend the day in my home office writing, researching, taking phone briefings and enquiry calls; or I am traveling to customer sites and events around the world. The former type of day is quite introspective, the other is socially demanding. The variety is part of what makes the job interesting.
  1. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    Many years ago being disinvited from an event because (I was told) that although I was a tier 1 analyst the vendor had decided I worked for a tier 2 firm. I am not sure in what world that kind of attitude makes for good relationships but most analysts have experienced this kind of nonsense at one time or another.
  1. How do you position your firm? What is your business model? 
    I would say 451 Research is a disruptive firm with reasonable scale (more than 120 analysts globally). We deliver a combination of research & data across fourteen channels aligned to the prevailing topics and technologies of digital infrastructure. Our digital transformation coverage spans from the data-center core to the mobile edge.
    We differentiate by publishing daily, topical, up-to-date reports via our Market Insights product. We also publish longer pieces of research such as our Voice of the Enterprise quarterly commentator products that we provide in a range of technology areas.
    Our customer base is a mix of suppliers, investors and buy-side organizations in that order. However, our readership influence tips that mix on its head, as our commentator network of over 30,000, accesses our research via a “freemium” model.
  1. What is your research methodology?
    We employ a lot of PhDs – indeed by some vendors’ metrics this fact alone would merit rebranding as a big data consultancy – so we undertake primary research. The research is largely conducted via the phone, although where we can we like to meet in person. However, the quantitative team is working with sample sizes that would make face-to-face meetings quite challenging!
  1. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
    I particularly welcome the all too rare ability to meet customers as part of the “speed-dating” executive 1:1 sessions that vendors provide at analyst events.
  1. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    Magdalen in Tooley Street is great and brings back good memories of the CIO dinners Kate Hanaghan and I hosted when we were running K2 Advisory.
  1. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    For the rest of the year? Trying to analyze “digital transformation services” in a way that is both meaningful and useful to our audiences. In the next 30 minutes? Deciding which biscuit to have with my cuppa
  1. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
    I have a lot of respect for William Fellows, who I have the pleasure of working with at 451 – he is an individual with an encyclopedic knowledge of the cloud industry. Other analysts that I find to be both creative and engaging in the way they work are Kate Hanaghan, Bola Rotibi, and Jess Figueras.

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Around Tim Jennings from Ovum in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/05/24/around-tim-jennings-from-ovum-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/05/24/around-tim-jennings-from-ovum-in-10-questions/#respond Mon, 23 May 2016 23:02:14 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=113594 Today we ask our probing questions of Tim Jennings (LinkedIn, @tjennings, bio) Chief Research Officer and Research Fellow at Ovum (@ovum, see related posts).

 

1. What are your coverage areas?Ovum Tim Jennings
As Chief Research Officer at Ovum, my focus is less on a specific topic, and more on how technology overall is being applied to create business value. That said, I need to keep abreast of all the hot topics, and be able to hold vaguely sensible conversations on anything from converged infrastructure to customer experience. If I was to pick the coverage area that I enjoy most, it would be BI and information management.

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
There continues to be a lot of change in our market, and the two trends that I would pick out currently are the impact of peer advice and communities, and the move for research and analysis to become more data-centric. I think though that there is no letup in technology innovation, so there will always be a place for knowledgeable, trusted advisors to help make sense of it.

3. What is your typical day like?
Very varied! I spend a lot of my time face to face with enterprise clients, perhaps rather less time at vendor conferences than I used to. When I’m not on the road, I split my time between Ovum’s London office and my home office near Birmingham, but I often find that the least disturbed place to work is on a train. As with many analysts the day gets extended at both ends with calls to Asia-Pac in the morning and to the US in the evening.

4. Now, c’;mon, tell me an AR horror story?
The guilty shall be nameless (and this one was a long time ago), but sitting through a six hour briefing from 10 to 4 with no lunch or sustenance was not an easy thing to do – I was a young and inexperienced analyst in those days, so didn’t say a thing. More generally, my biggest bugbear is when AR people don’t have a good understanding of my coverage or the firm’s business, and briefings end up missing the mark completely – thankfully these occasions are rare.

5. How do you position your firm?
What is your business model? (where are your revenues coming from, mix between users and vendors?) Ovum helps leading technology service and solution providers find the most effective route to market. We also work with 50,000 global IT decision-makers each year. We enable them to formulate and implement IT strategies, and select the right technologies and solutions. The majority of our revenue comes from technology users, particularly across telecoms, media, financial services and public sector organizations. Advising on the impact and application of technology on business in these industry sectors, with dedicated teams focusing on each, is a critical part of our proposition.

6. What is your research methodology? 
There’s no substitute for talking to users, so that underpins everything that I do. It’s also important to me to have these viewpoints supported by extensive primary research, and augmented by quality conversations with technology executives.

7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended?
I feel that it’s the relationship that’s important in AR, and having been an analyst for … hmm … quite a long time, I most appreciate those good long – term relationships with folks like Ricarda Rodatus, Dennis Macneil and the rest of the Oracle AR team, Geoff Dorrington at CA, Malee Dharmasena at Cisco, and many others that have been good friends over the years.

8. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
Downtime for me is taking my motorhome on the road – in the UK if it’s a short break, but preferably to France, Germany or Spain. The greatest pleasure in France is to sit down with a large plate of crevettes and a glass of rosé. (P.S. I’m making myself hungry just writing that!)

9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
For the next 6 months, collaborating with our clients, and with my colleagues across our analyst teams, to build a great research agenda for 2017 and beyond, that achieves a fair balance for everyone, and hits all the right notes. For the next 30 minutes, making sure I don’t miss my flight back home from Schiphol, having
had an enjoyable day visiting some of our Dutch clients. (I’ve also decided that I’ve spent too much of my life bashing away at my laptop in Schiphol – far too much of a home from home!)

10. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
My thoughts turn to four colleagues who are sadly no longer with us – Madan Sheina, Mike Thompson, Rob Hailstone, and David Mitchell. All of them were great analysts, with robust independent views, and strongly protective of the analyst craft, and I learnt plenty from them at different stages of my analyst career.

 

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Around Anthony Mullen from Gartner in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/04/27/around-anthony-mullen-from-gartner-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/04/27/around-anthony-mullen-from-gartner-in-10-questions/#respond Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:50:03 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=108065 Today we ask our probing questions of Anthony Mullen  from Gartner (@gartner, see related posts). Anthony ( LinkedIn, @ant_mull) recently joined Gartner and was previously with Forrester. Last year while working in a data science consultancy, Anthony conceived of and ran a piece of R&D work that developed the worlds first richAnthony Mullen segmentation using wearable data. The work went on to develop propensity to buy predictions related to heart rate as well as dissecting what made for a good nights sleep.

 

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    I have two main streams that I’m working on. The first is macro trends and forecasting in the personal technologies space. The second is more horizontal research which covers topics like analytics, AI, IoT and the connected home. From a role point of view I often write for customer experience professionals, strategic planners and innovation teams.

  1. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    Ultimately I see analyst firms having a stronger mix of skills drawn from the cognitive sciences domain. From anthropologists and psychologists to linguistics experts, neuroscientists and AI specialists. Without this mix it’s going to get too difficult to interpret data and study behavior. I think this is not just true for analyst firms but for all firms.
  2. What’s your typical day like?
    Drop the kids off to nursery and maybe squeeze a run in with my wife. Avoid email for a few hours and create something whether it’s a report outline, framework or graphic. Morning energy is all about creating. When the US wakes up in the afternoon then the video calls start which can cover quite a wide range of topics from client inquiry, briefings, forecasting planning to research topic exploration.
  3. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
    No specific story other than the regular occurrence of vendors desperate to present a deck to you and having to be increasingly firmer about the questions you need answered. I always enjoy it when an AR rep messages the vendor during their screen share to stop talking about something and it comes up on the screen.
  4. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
    Gartner, Inc. (NYSE: IT) is the world’s leading information technology research and advisory company. The company delivers the technology-related insight necessary for its clients to make the right decisions, every day. From CIOs and senior IT leaders in corporations and government agencies, to business leaders in high-tech and telecom enterprises and professional services firms, to technology investors, Gartner is the valuable partner to clients in approximately 10,000 distinct enterprises worldwide. Through the resources of Gartner Research, Gartner Executive Programs, Gartner Consulting and Gartner Events, Gartner works with every client to research, analyze and interpret the business of IT within the context of their individual role. Founded in 1979, Gartner is headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, USA, and has 7,100 associates, including more than 1,500 research analysts and consultants, and clients in 90 countries.
  5. What is your research methodology?
    Somewhere between free form jazz improvisation and colouring by numbers – I tend to go big and then work in. Lots of web research, quizzing vendors and exploring with domain experts.
  6. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
    When an AR firm actually knows about my research and can shoot the breeze around a few topics then it creates a much stronger connection.
  7. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
    Main hobbies are music – mostly writing rather than performing these days. I’ve been lucky enough to make records all over the world with musicians from India, Greece and Egypt to Argentina.
  8. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?
    An overarching framework for forecasting and a grammar for mega, macro and microtrends.
  9. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?Does anyone ever pick a single analyst here?! There are lots of great analysts around especially in Gartner. I get different things from each of them and enjoy sparring with the future gazers, macroeconomic experts, hardcore IT architecture boffins, vertical specialists as well as the young bucks.
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Around Jon Collins from GigaOm in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/23/around-jon-collins-from-gigaom-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/23/around-jon-collins-from-gigaom-in-10-questions/#respond Wed, 23 Mar 2016 12:48:38 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=102326 IMG_7593Today we ask our probing questions of Jon Collins from GigaOm (@gigaom, see related posts). Jon ( LinkedIn, @jonno) is an analyst at GigaOm, a columnist for IDG, a member of the  editorial team and  ukele. Jon was elected as IIAR’s European Analyst of the Year award in 2009.

1. What are your coverage areas?
I’m looking at emerging technologies and their impact on the business landscape. I know this remit is broad, but it distils down to integration and orchestration, data management/governance and above all user experience — and reflects the challenges faced by CEOs, CTOs and CIOs the world over:
(a) Machine learning, in particular how it can integrate with other systems to turn insight into action
(b) Communication and collaboration, with a focus on enabling innovation, productivity and engagement
(c) Internet of Things, keeping an ongoing view on developments and vertical applications e.g. asset tracking
(d) Platforms and the API economy, enabling companies to grow and changing the business landscape
(e) User experience, emphasising augmentation and integration, e.g. VR, connected car dashboards
(f) Vertical applications of technology, particularly in retail, healthcare, agriculture and creative industries

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
First off, I do understand the view that the only type of industry analysts that matter are those directly involved in buying decisions. That view has its place – particularly for enterprise-facing vendors who are more concerned in maintaining their traditional sales channels. At the same time, I also understand the counter-arguments: that there is more to technology delivery than procurement; that it’s important to engage with other stakeholder groups; that the analyst role is to educate as well as influence; and so on. Beyond all of this however is an underlying sea change in the role of technology, not as something ‘out there’ to be bought and deployed, but as an intrinsic element of business models. We’re seeing the impact in terms of how suppliers network, how consumers engage, how and where value is created. There will always be a place for ‘old style’ IT, and therefore for more traditional analyst models; however, if organisations want to get their heads round many of the technology topics that tax them today – IoT for example, they find that they can’t procure their way through, nor can they hope any one big vendor or service provider will follow suit. I think a word in business is ‘bifurcation’, which is about separating the static and dynamic parts of the business; similarly, the analyst marketplace has to bifurcate, to cater for both old and new.

3. What’s your typical day like?
When I’m not travelling I have a bit of a routine – it starts with a coffee in the ‘thinking chair’ where I plan activities for the day. As most of my work boils down to research and writing, I tend to work best in 2-hour bursts, broken up by a short walk or similar. Where I need to get my head into something, for some reason I find myself gravitating to Radiohead. A luxury I know, but I try not to work in the evenings as I need my head clear for the next day. Evenings are a good moment for some research about a topic, so I will have a 20 minute drink from the fire hydrant so that data can be ‘‘considered’ overnight!

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
My best personal horror story is where I was going to see the Metro shop of the future with Intel, due to a rep being ill I had to find my own way there… and ended up at a hypermarket in the middle of nowhere. On the other side, most horrors are quite dull, usually involving sitting through some content-free (parts of) events where time could be better spent. I know, I should get out more! Many horrors boil down to expectation management, for example being expected to say something is cool or adds business value when it patently isn’t, or to say something the research doesn’t reflect.

5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
GigaOm’s current revenues are partially based on sponsored content services to vendors – blog posts, webinars and so on. Within the model, we have a pretty free rein on topics – in general they are about looking for the business consequences, and therefore what organisations need to think about. We also produce blogs and reports internally on more general topics, opinion pieces and so on. In addition, we produce a series of research reports which can be licensed. As the company finds its feet, I look forward to supporting a broader range of services, including end-user enquiries. (where are your revenues coming from, mix between users and vendors?)

6. What is your research methodology?
In typical analyst fashion, the answer is, ‘It depends’! In general research is desk-based, with the addition of direct F2F, primary research where useful. Because the topics are more about emerging technologies, straight questions about adoption are not always the best approach. (e.g. primary research, F2F or phone, secondary only, etc… in 255 characters or less)

7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended.
When AR works well, it stops being a numbers game – metrics like company score, mentions and so on become a spin-off benefit. AR is greatly enhanced by a vendor have something genuinely valuable to bring to the table, in which case it is up to AR to be sure that knowledge reaches the right people. When AR is used primarily to maintain a façade, the results are frequently unsustainable. Best practices therefore should be designed to help very busy people build a picture of a (sometimes complex) vendor and retain it over time. As a consequence, my ‘favourite’ AR pros are usually the ones who ‘get’ where the value lies in having a direct, transparent interchange between analysts and vendors, and who I can both have a beer with and be critical to. Trust is everything.

8. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share?
I’m in a ukulele band, in addition I make bread and make candlesticks. So I really am a baker and candlestick maker…

9. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 months?
I genuinely believe we are on the brink of some fundamental transformation in how technology is used, building on top of what might be termed a ‘digital foundation’. Understanding and articulating this will more than fill my time. In the next 30 minutes, reviewing this and sending it off without getting distracted!

10. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
As well as all my mentors and colleagues in companies I’ve worked, from Robin Bloor to Dale Vile, I’ll call out Claus Egge of IDC, who is sadly no longer with us. Claus was one of the first analysts that I met when I started in 1999, and he had a deep influence on how I viewed, and continue to view the role –with diligence, integrity, objectivity and even- handedness.

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Around Scott Liewehr from Digital Clarity Group in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/11/around-scott-liewehr-from-digital-clarity-group-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/03/11/around-scott-liewehr-from-digital-clarity-group-in-10-questions/#comments Fri, 11 Mar 2016 12:54:54 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=102249 dcg-team-profiles-scott-liewehrToday we ask our probing questions of Scott Liewehr from Digital Clarity Group (@Just_Clarity, see related posts). Scott ( LinkedIn@sliewehr) is the founder and CEO of Digital Clarity Group, voted New Analyst Firm of the Year by IIAR in 2014.

 

1. What are your coverage areas?
Customer Experience Management, Digital Transformation, Service Providers (specifically digital agencies and SI’s), marketing and ecommerce technologies, vendor and service provider selection, content management technology.

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
There’s some quality research and thought leadership being done, but unfortunately it all addresses only a small portion of the overall problem. Organizations are trying to figure out how to transform themselves digitally and to meet the ever-changing expectations of their customers. Various categories of software go a small part of the way to solve this, but a much larger portion of the delta between where buy-side companies are and where they want to be lies in how they implement this software, and then what they do with it once it’s installed. Agencies and integrators are on the front lines doing most of this work, yet IT analysts typically turn a blind eye to this fact because there are so many of service providers and they’re much harder to evaluate. Organizations can find oodles of information and plot graphs about the best hammers on the market, yet no one even tries to point them to an appropriate carpenter. It’s too bad, really.

3. What’s your typical day like?
Most days have something to do with an airplane and/or a hotel, but along the way I find myself on phone/web meetings most of the day, taking vendor or service provider briefings, conducting advisories / inquiries with buy- or sell-side clients, or talking to prospects about how we can help them. I also spend a lot of time in PowerPoint, crafting one presentation or another. And, finally, I spend a lot of time on internal affairs as well, interviewing talent or working with the team in some way or the other to push our agenda and research forward. I tend to do most of my actual work after 11pm since my days are usually taken up on calls or in meetings.

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?
I think my favorites are the few times I’ve received loud and expletive-laden calls after critiquing a vendor publicly, either on my monthly show (cms-connected.com), or in writing. Most know that I’m fair, and I’ll say two positive things for every criticism (and the AR person will ALWAYS know where I stand in advance), but a very small percentage of AR folks are hyper-sensitive and want to make an enemy out of anyone who doesn’t buy the BS their executives like to spin. I love being the calm one in the conversation, providing data and back-up to each point with which they take issue, and having them finally say, “yeah, fine, but you didn’t need to say it”. I actually think I’m pretty reserved in my public commentary, but sometimes you just strike a nerve.

[BTW, now that the show is recorded in advance, I always give the vendor a heads up that it’s coming — that wasn’t always possible when the show was streamed live. And blogs and papers will always be discussed or sent in advance.]

5. How do you position your firm? What is your business model?
Our mission is to help leaders leverage digital to optimize / transform the experience they deliver to customers, prospects and employees. To do this, we work directly with the buy-side to help them establish roadmaps and then to select the right technologies and services partners to get them there. We also offer executive councils and retainers, but most of our research and thought leadership follows the freemium model. On the sell-side, we work with both technology vendors and service providers in fairly typical ways — advisories, thought leadership, partner programs, speaking engagements, inquiries, workshops, etc. We also find ourselves working with private equity firms a fair amount, advising them through their due diligence, inorganic growth and exit strategies.

6. What is your research methodology?
We spend a lot of time on both primary and secondary research. Our new VOCalis program (C-Sat service about the service providers) has us talking to hundreds of buy-siders about their experiences with agencies and SI’s. We’re proud to have more data and insights on this space than anyone, bar none, and we’ll be putting it to great use in 2016 and beyond.

7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? Any why?
There are so many I like, but to name a few, Beth Torrie (Sitecore), Paige Pace (Adobe), and Brielle Nikaido (Salesforce) are standouts. Also Cassandra Allen (Razorfish), Teri Green (PwC), and Manoj Kumar (HCL). Finally, John Taschek at Salesforce, Darren Guarnaccia at Sitecore, and Kevin Cochrane at Jahia aren’t AR professionals, but their approaches to working with analysts are probably the best out there.

8. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.
I think Salesforce’s annual Analyst Summit is the best event I’ve attended. It’s 100% focused on the analysts, includes a good mix of roundtable interactions between execs and analysts (where Salesforce gets to ask *us* the questions — smart!), good 1:1 opportunities, and great food / location. It’s a smart event on their part, although having it the first week of the New Year makes me pity their AR team who must lose their holidays to planning. 🙁

9. Is there another analyst whose work you rate highly?
There are a lot, actually. I think my own colleague, Tim Walters, writes better than anyone in the industry. I’ve always appreciated Stephen Powers and the work he’s done at Forrester, although he may not think so because I’ve disagreed loudly at times (but I’ve praised him even more). I’m jealous of Ray Wang’s drive and the way he seems to extend his days to 30 hours apiece. I also appreciate his counsel and friendship — he’s constantly disrupting the norm. And finally, I’d say I enjoy reading Esteban Kolsky because of his relentless willingness to speak the truth according to himself. He’s true to his thoughts and belief system — sometimes they’re raw, but it’s an honorable quality nonetheless and enjoyable to read from afar.

10. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant / food that you’d like to share? I love to coach. I travel a lot, so I become super-dad on the weekend to my three kids. Right now I’m coaching four soccer teams, and once spring starts, I’ll be adding two baseball teams into the mix!

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Around Dan Bieler from Forrester in 10 questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/16/around-dan-bieler-from-forrester-in-10-questions-2/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/16/around-dan-bieler-from-forrester-in-10-questions-2/#respond Tue, 16 Feb 2016 12:36:16 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=101535 16zu9 Dan Bieler, Forrester ResearchToday we ask our probing questions of Dan Bieler from Forrester. Dan (Linkedin@DSBieler) was runner up in this years IIAR Analyst of the Year for 2015 as voted by analyst relations professionals

 

1. What are your coverage areas?

Key focus areas include customer engagement strategies, the mobile mind shift, and digital transformation.

2. What’s your typical day like?

When not travelling: jogging, report writing, customer calls; but a lot of travelling.

3. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

AR team performing as PR machine of vendor without any willingness for a two-way interaction.

4. How do you position your firm?

Selling syndicated research and consulting/advisory; end-users account for a large part of the business in addition to vendors.

5. What is your research methodology?  

 Primary, followed up by phone-based interviews, at times F2F discussions.

6. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? 

Yvonne Kaupp. Professional, good listener and communicator, very good at preparing briefings, workshops etc.

7. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve attended?

Listening to contrarian opinions and investigating how/why these opinions were shaped/arrived at.

8. What are your offerings and key deliverables? 

Reports, blogs, tweets, presentations, workshops, consulting projects.

 

Recent ‘IIAR Around in 10 questions’ posts

 

More posts mentioning Dan

 

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Around Errol Rasit from Gartner in 10 Questions https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/10/around-errol-rasit-from-gartner-in-10-questions/ https://analystrelations.org/2016/02/10/around-errol-rasit-from-gartner-in-10-questions/#respond Wed, 10 Feb 2016 10:10:29 +0000 https://analystrelations.org/?p=102065 Today we ask our probing questions of Errol Rasit from Gartner. Errol (Linkedin@ErrolRasit) was runner up in this years IIAR Analyst of the Year for 2015 as voted by analyst relations professionals.

1. What are your coverage areas?Errol Rasit / Gartner for the IIAR Around 10 Questions series

I typically describe my coverage as all things in the data center that you can kick, not that I would advise it. Percussive maintenance is not a first option! This translates to servers, storage, integrated systems, Hyperconvergence, and a special interest in in-memory computing. I also run a global team of analyst who specialize in Data Center Infrastructure technologies. We focus on both technology provider and end-user advice.

2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace?

I think the future looks good for IT analysis. Well, specifically advisory – representing the market we are in. As IT becomes more pervasive, and enabling, the breadth of people who require advisory services will increase. From an enterprise perspective, IT is much more accessible, and user-friendly today than it has ever been, and that trend will only continue. But the demand on IT organizations, whether centralized or distributed will grow, as IT becomes more integrated into the business. Today, I don’t know many CIOs who say they’ve got no IT problems. I think every expert group can benefit from expert advice today and in the future.

3. What’s your typical day like?

It starts quite early to catch our Asia Pacific (AP) clients, or my team members in AP. Usually a 7 am start, perhaps 6 if I want to catch Australia, or New Zealand at a decent hour. Throughout the day, a mixture of client calls, internal meetings – all of which are via video, so there’s a definite need for a shower and a shave at some point! Typically the working day flows into the evening seamlessly to catch our East Cost and West Coast clients and my team members that are based there. And sometimes very late evening calls to catch Australia and New Zealand in the AM! This is typical when I’m not travelling to see clients or present at our global events. It’s a fairly demanding day, but I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t love it.

4. Now, c’mon, tell me an AR horror story?

I’m not sure it qualifies as an AR horror story, but AR were certainly present when it occurred. At one vendor event, I noticed at breakfast I was getting a few funny looks as I sat and drank my coffee. I realized I was dressed exactly like the wait staff in that hotel (or they were dressed like me). This culminated later in the day in someone approaching me to place a coffee order whilst I was walking through the terrace.

5. How do you position your firm? 

Gartner, Inc. (NYSE: IT) is the world’s leading information technology research and advisory company. The company delivers the technology-related insight necessary for its clients to make the right decisions, every day. From CIOs and senior IT leaders in corporations and government agencies, to business leaders in high-tech and telecom enterprises and professional services firms, to technology investors, Gartner is the valuable partner to clients in approximately 10,000 distinct enterprises worldwide. Through the resources of Gartner Research, Gartner Executive Programs, Gartner Consulting and Gartner Events, Gartner works with every client to research, analyze and interpret the business of IT within the context of their individual role. Founded in 1979, Gartner is headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, USA, and has 7,100 associates, including more than 1,500 research analysts and consultants, and clients in 90 countries. 

6. What is your research methodology?

My personal methodology is mulit-mode – it has to be. Objectivity is key. Research is the job title, research is my mode of operation. My main source of insight is definitely from speaking to our end-user clients.

7. Any favourite AR professional you’d like to mention? 

I don’t think I could – I have so many favourites, it would be impossible, and futile to try and rank them. I would consider a dozen or more among the best in my humble opinion. When I think of these professionals, they are expert in helping me do my job and facilitating key insight. But more than that they are fantastic people to work with, and to socialize with – which is a very key point.

8. Tell us about one good AR practice you’ve experienced or one good AR event you’ve atttended.

Again there would be too many to list here. My favorite practice is pro-activeness – I don’t know what I don’t know, and there are many professionals that know me, and my research and will prioritize key insight via key contacts, without me needing to ask, or in some cases having thought of it.

9. What are your offerings and key deliverables? 

Through the resources of Gartner Research, Gartner Executive Programs, Gartner Consulting and Gartner Events, Gartner works with every client to research, analyze and interpret the business of IT within the context of their individual role. Founded in 1979, Gartner is headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, USA, and has 7,100 associates, including more than 1,500 research analysts and consultants, and clients in 90 countries.

10. Any hobbies or favourite restaurant/food that you’d like to share?

I don’t get too much time for hobbies, I certainly have been kicked off a few sports teams for not turning up enough due to travel and evening calls. But I like to run, swim and bike from a sports perspective (I’ve learnt to align to non-team sports). I also like to collect antiquities – you will see a 100 year old type-writer in the background of my home office video link! More importantly, food! I like to get around as many Texas/Carolina BBQ restaurants in London and sniff out (and drink) craft beers. But my favourite pastime is to spend time with my wife searching out and ranking our favourite hard to find, through scarcity or quality, food dishes in London. At the moment, we’re scouting as many Thai restaurants to get the best phad thai in London. Last challenge was to find the best Dan Dan Noodle!

11. What is your biggest challenges for the upcoming 6 months? And for the next 30 mn?

The next six months’ biggest challenge will be to keep my travel in check, and to keep on top of my research goals. For the next 30 minutes, try not to be distracted by googling more thai restaurants to try – I’m hungry now!

 12. Is there another analyst whose work  you rate highly?

All of those I have the pleasure of working with closely. It’s a fantastic industry.

 

Recent ‘IIAR Around in 10 questions’ posts

 

More posts mentioning Errol

 

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