Five Worst Practices for Managing AR Headcount

In my last post and in response to a friend’s question about how to size an AR team, I offered some criteria for consideration. This time let’s turn the equation around and discuss worst practices that often lead to wrong-sizing and related performance issues with AR.   Here they are in no particular order.

1. Early Stage Vendor Leans on Agency PR to do AR

The analyst relationships required to establish interest in an early stage vendor among the sometimes cynical lot of industry analysts requires trust – where the AR person obtains the proverbial “seat at the table” with the analysts. PR agencies often over-depend on social media, hard pitches, or analysts who only play to the media. The by-product is the start-up flies under the radar of the analysts with sway with real customers or potential partners. Emerging vendors are better off with a part-time AR contractor, or letting a product manager or product marketing handle the AR work; it more important to be real than over-hyped during the early stages.
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5 Criteria for Right-Sizing AR Teams

Note:  This was cross-posted from IIAR board member Evan Quinn’s blog: link.

An AR friend of mine recently asked if there was a formula or guideline for right-sizing AR teams. Unfortunately, there is no simple formula to the staffing question, but off the top of my head there are five factors that contribute to determining a reasonable headcount model for right-sizing an AR team, whether full-time employee or 3rd party agency or contractors. Continue reading

[Job Posting] AR Contract Role in San Francisco, BPO/FAO, Analytics and CRM

Part-time AR contract role in the San Francisco/Silicon Valley area.

Looking for 3-5 years experience as an analyst relations specialist, preferably with knowledge of analysts and markets in the BPO/FAO, Business Analytics and/or CRM/Retail space.

The role includes core AR functions such as analyst identification and qualification, briefing facilitation and research filtering.

Please contact Beth Trier at beth a.t triercompany dotcom

 

The IIAR at IDC Directions, Boston and San Jose

At IDC Directions on March 9th in Boston and on March 15th in San Jose, approximately 80 AR professionals attended the IDC-IIAR luncheon program – in fact the San Jose program was packed and IDC had to turn away walk-ins due to a lack of seats.  The program at both venues included speeches by Crawford Del Prete / Executive Vice President of IDC’s worldwide research (bio, @craw), Barbara French / Senior Director of Analyst Relations,  Juniper Networks (blog, @bfr3nch) and founder of Tekrati (now discontinued due to Barbara’s role at Juniper) and USA chapter heads from the IIAR. Continue reading

Frost & Sullivan to Present Webinar on 8th April

The IIAR is delighted to host an IIAR Webinar with Frost & Sullivan and speakers John Lake / Strategic Account Manager, and Adrian Drozd / Research Manager / Principal Analyst, Telecoms. The call is scheduled for Friday 8th April at 13:00 BST.  Marc Duke ( blog, @marcduke, LinkedIn) will introduce the speakers, who will discuss the following topics:

  • Introduction to Frost & Sullivan
  • Research Services overview
  • Consulting Service overview
  • Research coverage and production – ICT
  • Mega trends 2011

For those unfamiliar with the IIAR’s teleconferences, the format of the discussion will have the featured speakers sharing their insights followed by a Q&A.

To sign up for the webinar, IIAR members should please email jcourtenay (at)analystrelations (dot) org.

[Job Posting] Strategy Analytics Seeks Analyst for Enterprise Mobility

Analyst, Enterprise Mobility Newton, MA, USA

In order to extend our research leadership in enterprise mobility, Strategy Analytics, is offering an outstanding career opportunity for a disciplined and results-driven team member to join our Wireless Enterprise Strategies (WES) team. A strong desire for success, visibility in a highly dynamic industry, and a background within the wireless telecommunications, enterprise IT and/or market research sectors are essential for this role. Continue reading

Around Barry Wilderman from Wilderman Associates in 10 questions

Barry WildermanToday’s star analyst in our reasonably Barry Wilderman (blog),ex-META Group and Lawson, now running an  independent firm, Wilderman Associates.

  1. What are your coverage areas?
    I am interested in how customers derive value from enterprise applications: breaks down into package selection, managing consulting teams, post implementation success, cost management, support. Customers have a hard time demanding a value-centered project, which then leads to a strong ROI. Also cover business intelligence as a sub-specialty.
  2. What are your opinions of the IT Analysis Marketplace and where do you see it going?
    I think it remains uneven. You can only form strong, useful opinions by getting background from the vendor, and then testing your assumptions with customers’ experiences. Continue reading

Ethics isn’t just around white papers

A while back, Curt Monash (@curtmonash, blog) caught our attention by calling on tech vendors and solution providers to disclose which IT analysts’ white papers posted on their web pages, or otherwise used in marketing, are sponsored. That’s good practice, and one which most AR professionals have supported over the last decade or more.

But since AR is a two-way street, what about the reverse? Shouldn’t IT analysts (and actually, pretty much about everyone, including bloggers) disclose if a specific research area, project, note, blog post, white paper, speech, webcast, etc, is being paid for by a third party?

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[GUEST POST] Money, analyst attention, and implied analyst endorsement

This post, first published on Strategic Messaging,  is reposted here courtesy of the author, Curt Monash (bio, @curtmonash)”

This was and is meant to be a generally-applicable post. It just turns out to be laced with examples from my own experiences. I hope those aren’t too distracting from the broader points.

It is widely believed among analyst relations professionals that one should engage the services of the analysts most influential in one’s industry, in the hope that the analysts one pays will speak well of one’s company, publicly or privately as the case may be. Thus, the best way for an analyst to make money is:

  • Become influential in the industry s/he covers.
  • Say nice things about the companies in it, especially the ones with larger budgets.

On the whole, I think I do better at the first of those tasks than the second.

Sometimes the connection between money and saying nice things is pretty blatant. For example, I’m often asked “Hey, would you be interested in doing a white paper that highlights our product’s advantages?” Unfortunately for my bank account, I almost never think it’s a good idea to accept the commission. It’s not that I dispute that it is possible to be ethical when writing white papers. I just don’t find it easy. And frankly, even analysts I regard as ethical commonly turn out white papers with somewhat more bias than I like to see in documents carrying my name.

Even more directly, I’m occasionally grilled to the effect “Is your view of us sufficiently favorable that we should retain your services?” Those discussions generally don’t end up in a paying relationship, but so be it; the companies who do that aren’t clients I’d much enjoy having anyway.

[READ THE REST ON STRATEGIC MESSAGING]

Reminder to Register for the March 24 IIAR London Forum

The next IIAR London Forum is scheduled for Thursday, March 24th, from 3:45 to 6:30pm in Central London.  The guest session will feature Gartner analysts,Alexander Drobik, Group Team Manager, Business Applications and Processes research team, and Jeff Golterman, GVP, Product Management in Gartner’s High Tech and Telecom Programs business unit.

We still have a few places left, and non-members are invited. Please RSVP to Jane Courtenay, jcourtenay(at)analystsrelations(dot) org.

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